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Comment Re:While I doubt the seriousness of the claims her (Score 2) 588

Ok, the rest of your points aside:

Could it cause cancer/whatever? Maybe, otherwise I wouldn't be able to actively detect it

I can detect red, salt, rough, smooth, acceleration, loud, hot + many more things. Some of these are in the form of radiation. The ones I mentioned don't cause cancer/whatever. Your argument is flawed.

and I'm sure there are people more sensitive than me.

How? You'd better have some studies or you're only as sure about it as people who are sure the earth is flat. I'm open to evidence here as long as there is some.

And yes, I'm completely willing to submit to any test anyone wants to perform. I have done so many times so far and they're always surprised that my sensory disorder is real.

Dropbox + scanned image of diagnosis document + link in reply might not get you on the 6:00 news, but it's a start.

Comment Re:wish this existed in silicon valley (Score 1) 258

I think you should do a city swap with this guy, if you think London is worse than Mexico City for cycling in I suspect you are deeply mistaken.

I take it you've cycled in both to come to that conclusion? I haven't cycled in or commented on the safety of either, so I'm interested how you came to the conclusion that I think Mexico City is safer than London for cycling.

Neither you nor OP have demonstrated is how dedicated cycling infrastructure is detrimental to i. Cyclist safety, ii. Other road users. If that is the position you're taking please clarify yourself. That is the point being discussed, not the relevant safety of one city to another.

Comment Re:wish this existed in silicon valley (Score 1) 258

And it is somewhat true. I also have my tricks for my usual drive to work. If you bike to work, you will spend some weeks finding the best route and then optimizing it a bit — but after that, you will just basically repeat known patterns.

Cycling in places I am not familiar with means I must be even more careful, which translates to driving slower. And absolutely with no distractions (i.e. radio).

I think it'd be nice if cyclists who obey the road rules could expect a similar level of safety to other road users. Yes, in reality I know being the lightest most fragile thing on the road means you have to drive defensively. While I'm young enough my reflexes can take care of that, but there are very, very few old road cyclists here.
I know a few older people who used to ride on the road, it's 100% not safe for them: the combination of slower reflexes, more brittle bones at that age and longer healing times means the next idiot who wants to get around something without checking their mirrors instead of waiting 30 seconds could be the last thing outside of a hospital room they ever see.

Comment Re:wish this existed in silicon valley (Score 1) 258

You can reduce those risks by becoming familiar with your route and how motorists behave at different times of day, then adjusting your riding habits accordingly.

To give you an example of what I mean: there is a particular 3-way stop in my city where I always pull over to the left hand side of the lane. This is because the driver's view on one of the streets is obstructed by a large tree, so a cyclist on the right would go unseen. While my first couple of trips through that intersection were scary, because I was sticking to the right, becoming familiar with the intersection and modifying my riding habits accordingly made the trip much safer.

No offence, but it sounds to me like you're saying anyone riding through that intersection not familiar with it is in a fair amount of danger.

Comment Re:wish this existed in silicon valley (Score 2, Insightful) 258

Oh, FFS... I am an urban cyclist in Mexico City.

Hello, I'm an urban cyclist in what's considered my country's most cycle-friendly city.

Of course, I don't cycle in highways/motorways. Of course, I go out of my way to be sure I am seen. Of course, I know all of the driving rules (and many of the usual wrongs). Of course, I am very very careful.

Where I live you would be 1. Arrested almost immediately, 2. Hit by another vehicle, 3. Fined 4. Hit by another vehicle for not doing so

But riding a bike in a city not thought for bikes is perfectly doable.

Doable, yes. Doable safely, no. People (passengers and drivers alike) regularly kill cyclists because they can't be bothered to look behind them before opening a car door, or stop SMSing their fully sick M8s long enough to check the mirrors of their daddy's BMW while they pull into your lane without indicating.

And we will only achieve greater visibility and better city design by breaking the balance and becoming more visible. By becoming more cyclists. By being seen so often on the roads that motorists will *expect* us to be there.

“Because it’s so narrow, the cars have to move out a lane or half lane, it creates confusion and traffic,” - The lord mayor of the country's most cycle accessible city reflecting the attitude of the city's non-cyclists. Drivers will not put up for going an average of 10-15kph slower, changing lane, or gently swerving to avoid cyclists. Period.

I don't need (and often don't want, as they are usually not very well planned nor enough drivable) cyclist-only paths. We are a moving vehicle, and should coexist with traffic.

If the other traffic behaved in a way that wasn't dangerous to the average cyclists life, perhaps. I'm a cautious cyclist and I count on average one event per hour of road time that would lead to a serious or fatal incident if I hadn't taken emergency actions.

I can't imagine how people less prepared for the reality of the dangers involved, or those a bit less cautious than me manage but I can see the statistics of road fatalities and serious injuries that result.

Would you take your 1988 hatchback along a highway populated by high-speed monster trucks driven by people with nothing better to do than drive as fast as they can to the next red light? How do you think they feel about your $500 fuel efficient car keeping up with their $200k gas guzzlers? Apparently, where I'm from, that sort of thing is tantamount to telling someone to go forth and multiply.

Drivers feel well within their rights to not have to be bothered to "move out a lane or half lane", after all the lord mayor doesn't seem to think they should.

Comment Re:I am afraid the answer is, "Yes!" (Score 1) 517

Ask Slashdot: Are Post-Install Windows Slowdowns Inevitable?

When patches and updates together end up being larger than the original [OEM] install, you can see why the slowdown is inevitable.

Sounds easy to see why. No?

No... Why don't my other OS's slow down when I update them?

Comment Re:So Austrailia (Score 2) 57

has gone back to its roots as a Prison Colony again?

Well spotted. It's a little known fact that England sent all of its internet copyright infringers over to Australia in 1788. Of course this was only after America declared independence and stopped accepting England's internet copyright infringers.

Comment Re:Just a thought (Score 1) 57

Maybe you shouldn't elect those people.

This legislation had bi-partisan support, so unless the majority of seats were populated by an independent or a member of one of smaller parties such as the greens, not much would have changed.

Incidentally the greens are doing a lot better these last few elections than they have in the past... go figure.


Past a Certain Critical Temperature, the Universe Will Be Destroyed 143

StartsWithABang writes: If you take all the kinetic motion out of a system, and have all the particles that make it up perfectly at rest, somehow even overcoming intrinsic quantum effects, you'd reach absolute zero, the theoretically lowest temperature of all. But what about the other direction? Is there a limit to how hot something can theoretically get? You might think not, that while things like molecules, atoms, protons and even matter will break down at high enough temperatures, you can always push your system hotter and hotter. But it turns out that the Universe limits what's actually possible, as any physical system will self-destruct beyond a certain point.

Does a Black Hole Have a Shape? 108

StartsWithABang writes: When you think about a black hole, you very likely think about a large amount of mass, pulled towards a central location by the tremendous force of gravity. While black holes themselves may be perfectly spherical (or for rotating black holes, almost perfectly spherical), there are important physical cases that can cause them to look tremendously asymmetrical, including the possession of an accretion disk and, in the most extreme case, a merger with another black hole.

Comment Re:dont' engage it with people there? (Score 5, Informative) 392

The article seems to indicate that hammering the accelerator bypasses the pedestrian avoidance system. So, whether or not one was installed, activated and functioning correctly the driver still would have hit those pedestrians because of the way they were driving.

A committee is a group that keeps the minutes and loses hours. -- Milton Berle