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Submission + - Oracle VM Virtualbox 4.3 announced with multi-touch user interface

rjmarvin writes: Oracle today announced general availability of of VM Virtualbox 4.3 with additional device and platform support, enhanced networking capabilities enabling developers to virtualize modern post-PC era operating system features while maintaining compatibility with legacy operating systems.

Submission + - Cells Reprogrammed in Living Mice ( 1

sciencehabit writes: Researchers have discovered a surprisingly effective way to “reprogram” mature mouse cells into an embryolike state, able to become any of the body’s cell types. Their recipe: Let the transformation happen in a living animal instead of a petri dish. The finding could help scientists better understand how reprogramming works and it may one day help breed replacement tissues or organs in the lab—or in living patients.

Submission + - Google pledges not to sue open source software, unless first attacked (

sfcrazy writes: Google has announced the Open Patent Non-Assertion (OPN) Pledge. In it's pledge Google says that they will not sue any user, distributor or developer of open-source software on specified patents, unless first attacked. Under this pledge, Google is starting off with 10 patents relating to MapReduce, a computing model for processing large data sets first developed at Google. Google says that over time they intend to expand the set of Google’s patents covered by the pledge to other technologies.

Submission + - New Brain Implant Transmits Wirelessly to Computer (

kkleiner writes: "Scientists at Brown University have made a brain implant that can record and transmit brain signals to a computer wirelessly. Free from onerous connections and wires, the technology could foster the development of a new generation of more flexible robotics to help amputees, spinal cord injury victims, or people with crippling neurological disorders. Referred to the researchers affectionately as the “can,” the titanium-enclosed device measures 2.2 inches (56 mm) long, 1.65 inches (42 mm) wide, and 0.35 inches (9 mm) thick. That’s pretty small considering it contains an array of 100 electrodes, a lithium ion battery, and custom-designed ultralow-power integrated circuits, radio and infrared wireless transmitters, and a copper coil for recharging."

Submission + - NYC's Bloomberg On Drones: "Scary" But Inevitable ( 1

redletterdave writes: "New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg was asked in a radio interview about the domestic use of drones by the government: 'We're going into a different world unchartered, and like it or not, what people can do or governments can do is different, and you can to some extent control [that], but you can't keep the tides from coming in. We're going to have more visibility and less privacy. I don't see how you stop that. It's not a question of a question of whether I think it's good or bad — I don't see how you stop that.'"

Submission + - College student creates gel to stop bleeding, star healing (

NotBornYesterday writes: A 20-year-old New York University student has invented a gel which, according to him, can stop heavy bleeding instantly. With the introduction of the latest invention by Joe Landolina,routine bandages could soon become a thing of the past. According to Landolina the Veti-Gel produced by him, can not only stop bleeding but also instantly start the healing process even on major wounds and wounds on internal organs and key arteries.

The gel, according to the report, is an artificial version of extracellular matrix, which is a substance present in the connective tissue which holds up an animal body together.

In a video with the article, the experimenter can be seen cutting a deep slice into the pork flesh while real pigs blood is being injected into the flesh at the same time. Soon after the flesh is cut, the blood starts flowing freely. However, as soon as the gel is applied on the cut and second liquid sprayed over it, the bleeding suddenly stops.

The Courts

Submission + - Twitter Sued $50M For Refusing To Identify Anti-Semitic Users ( 1

redletterdave writes: "After a French civil court ruled on Jan. 24 that Twitter must identify anyone who broke France's hate speech laws, Twitter has since refused to identify the users behind a handful of hateful and anti-Semitic messages, resulting in a $50 million lawsuit. Twitter argues it only needs to comply with US laws and is thus protected by the full scope of the First Amendment and its free speech privileges, but France believes its Internet users should be subject to the country's tighter laws against racist and hateful forms of expression."
The Internet

Submission + - A 50 Gbps TCP connection with Multipath TCP (

Olivier Bonaventure writes: The TCP protocol is closely coupled with the underlying IP protocol.
Once a TCP connection has been established through one IP address,
the other packets of the connection must be sent from this address. This
makes mobility and load balancing difficult. Multipath TCP is
a new extension that solves these old problems by decoupling TCP from
the underlying IP. A Multipath TCP connection can send packets over
several interfaces/addresses simultaneously while remaining backward
compatible with existing TCP applications. Multipath TCP has several use
cases including smartphones that can use both WiFi and 3G or servers
that can pool multiple high-speed interfaces. Christoph Paasch, Gregory
Detal and their colleagues who develop the implementation of
Multipath TCP in the Linux kernel have achieved 50 Gbps for a single TCP
connection by pooling together six 10 Gbps interfaces. See here for
technical details and full source code.


Submission + - Political Pressure Pushes NASA Technical Reports Offline

Trepidity writes: "The extensive NASA Technical Report Archive was just taken offline, following pressure from members of U.S. Congress, worried that Chinese researchers could be reading the reports. U.S. Representative Frank Wolf (R-VA) demanded that "NASA should immediately take down all publicly available technical data sources until all documents that have not been subjected to export control review have received such a review", and NASA appears to have complied. Although all reports are in the public domain, there doesn't appear to be a third-party mirror available (some university libraries do have subsets on microfiche)."

Submission + - Critical Samsung Android Phone Vulnerabilities (

Orome1 writes: Tired of waiting for Samsung to fix a string of critical flaws in their smartphones running Android, Italian security researcher Roberto Paleari has decided to inform the public about the seriousness of the matter and maybe make the company pick up the pace. Mindful of the danger that the vulnerabilities present to the users if they are exploited by malicious individuals, he decided not to share any technical details, but to just give a broad overview of what their misuse would allow. This includes a silent installation of highly-privileged applications with no user interaction and an app performing almost any action on the victim's phone.

Submission + - Testing an Ad-free Microtransaction Utopia ( 1

MrAndrews writes: After reading a Slashdot story about adblocking and the lively discussion that followed, I got to wondering how else sites can support themselves, if paywalls and ads are both non-starters. Microtransactions have been floated for years, but never seem to take off, possibly because they come off as arbitrary taxation or cumbersome walled-garden novelties. Still, it seems like the idea of microtransactions is still appealing, it's just the wrapping that's always been flawed. I wanted to know how viable the concept really was, so I've created a little experiment to gather some data, to put some real numbers to it. It's a purely voluntary system, where you click 1, 2 or 3-cent links in your bookmark bar, depending on how much you value the page you're visiting. No actual money is involved, it's just theoretical. There's a summary page that tells you how much you would have spent, and I'll be releasing anonymized analyses of the data in the coming weeks. If you're game, please check out the experiment page for more information, and give it a go. Even if you only use it once and forget about it, that says something about the concept right there.

Submission + - KDE releases Plasmate 1.0, a Plasma Workspaces SDK (

jrepin writes: "The KDE Plasma Workspaces team is excited to announce the first stable release of Plasmate: an add-ons SDK that focuses on ease of use. Plasmate follows the UNIX philosophy of "do one thing, and do it well". As such, it is not a general purpose IDE but rather a tool specifically tailored to creating Plasma Workspace add-ons using non-compiled languages such as QML and Javascript. It guides each step in the process, simplifying and speeding up project creation, development, adding new assets, testing and publishing. The goal of Plasmate is to enable creating something new in seconds and publishing it immediately."

Submission + - NASA's loopy space colony designs from the '70s (

oag2 writes: Discover Magazine has a new slideshow of NASA's pie-in-the-sky (or, rather, toroid-in-the-sky) mock-ups of what space colonies would look like, complete with verdant mountains, flowing rivers, cocktail parties, and a guy on a floating bicycle. Though the designs are retro-futuristic, the artist who made them was prescient in other ways. From the accompanying article:

'In the context of the 70s, when we had some sense of momentum from Apollo as far as expanding the human presence in space, it seemed like the kind of thing we could have just picked up and moved with,' Davis says. 'And it’s still possible. It’s just a matter of where we decide to spend our money." But Guidice remembers a more telling prophecy from O’Neill. "One of the most memorable things I ever heard him say was, 'If we don’t do it right now,' meaning in the next 20 years, and that was 20 years ago, 'then we’ll never do it, because we’ll be overpopulated and the strain on the natural resources will be the number one priority. We will not have any sort of inclination to see this through.'"


Submission + - Here Come...China's Drones (

An anonymous reader writes: Global headlines have focused in on America's Drone strike program, targeted killings, and their use in modern warfare. While the US is certainly the biggest developer and has the most advanced technology, China is catching up quickly. China's military has a tremendous amount of UAVs underdevelopment that could soon rival the United States. Chinese military and government agencies would like to use drones for surveillance and offensive operations — and in some instances already have. China also plans to sell them around the world — at sometimes 25% the cost of an American drone.

Submission + - How is the six-strikes system in any way legal?

WarmBoota writes: IANAL so I'd like to throw this out to anyone with a legal background. How is it legal for ISPs to intercept Internet communication for the purpose of copyright "re-education"? I'd like to know why this doesn't run afoul of wiretap laws and learn what laws keep telephone conversations (hopefully) private but allow for this type of one-sided judgment regarding the legality of a download.

I like work; it fascinates me; I can sit and look at it for hours.