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Submission + - Amazon Makes £7.6bn In UK, Pays Zero Corporation Tax (

hypnosec writes: Amazon sales revenue numbers in the UK have been huge over recent times. One in four books sold in the UK are through Amazon. It's Britain's biggest online retailer, and generated some £3.3 billion in sales last year. Yet the firm didn't pay any corporation tax on the profits made. However, the retail giant appears to be under HMRC investigation — or at least a filing by parent with the US securities and exchange commission indicates a tax inquiry of some sort is being conducted. In fact, the filing shows that in the past three years, Amazon has generated some £7.6 billion in sales in the UK, none of which has seen a penny of corporation tax paid.
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Submission + - Dutch DoJ admits breaking the law (

xonen writes: A spokesman for the dutch police, Mr. Lodewijk van Zwieten — national officer for cyber-crime and interception — admitted that the dutch police violates the law by breaking into foreign computers on a frequent base.

He claims the law does not cover current times when it comes to 'the online hunt for pedophiles and other criminals' — as the digital world is border-less but most jurisdiction isn't.

"While we have to ask our foreign colleagues for permission, criminals can access the whole world with a press of the button", van Zwieten sais. As examples are mentioned a recent kp case, and the 'Bredolab' botnet. "When cyber criminals infected 30 million computers worldwide with a hostile virus, the dutch recherche hacked foreign computers".

They plead for laws that 'can catch up with the current speed of developments, because else detectives are always a step behind'.

According to Van Zwieten "internationally, investigation bodies are all having the same problem, and 'have to learn to look at the existing rules with new glasses"

Apparently, laws do not apply to the police, and international criminal activities did not exist before internet, outdating any existing law, giving a free ticket to break them — as long as Justitia is your employer.

--With my humble excuses for the primitive translation.


Submission + - Scientist Say People Aren't Smart Enough for Democracy to Flourish ( 2

cold fjord writes: The inability of the incompetent to recognize their own limitations is a story that has been covered before on Slashdot. But, what happens when you apply that finding to politics? You get a provocative answer. From the article:

The democratic process relies on the assumption that citizens . . . can recognize the best political candidate, or best policy idea . . . But a growing body of research has revealed an unfortunate aspect of the human psyche that would seem to disprove this notion, and imply instead that democratic elections produce mediocre leadership and policies. . . The research . . . shows that incompetent people are inherently unable to judge the competence of other people, or the quality of those people's ideas. . . . if people lack expertise on tax reform, it is very difficult for them to identify the candidates who are actual experts. They simply lack the mental tools needed to make meaningful judgments. . . . . . democracies rarely or never elect the best leaders. Their advantage over dictatorships or other forms of government is merely that they "effectively prevent lower-than-average candidates from becoming leaders."

As Sir Winston Churchill said: Many forms of Government have been tried and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.


Feds Overstate Software Piracy's Link To Terrorism 448

Lucas123 writes "Attorney General Michael Mukasey claims that terrorists sell pirated software as a way to finance their operations, without presenting a shred of evidence for his case. He's doing it to push through a controversial piece of intellectual property legislation that would increase IP penalties, increase police power, set up a new agency to investigate IP theft, and more. 'Criminal syndicates, and in some cases even terrorist groups, view IP crime as a lucrative business, and see it as a low-risk way to fund other activities,' Mukasey told a crowd at the Tech Museum of Innovation last week."

One picture is worth 128K words.