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Comment: Re:So... providing electricity is easy, IT is hard (Score 1) 192

That's kinda backwards except at unusually ignorant companies. When a system works without fail, that means it is properly funded and staffed. It is possible that it is over-funded and overstaffed, so it is something that would likely be reviewed. But, few managers thing that a system that crashes regularly is normal. That would indicate incompetence or or possibly good people not allowed to do their job. So if a good system deteriorate and it correlates to changes in staffing and/or funding, that would be noticed. If it isn't noticed by higher management, IT management should have the metrics to make a report showing it over time. I know correlation isn't causation, but it makes for a decent argument.

Comment: Re:So... providing electricity is easy, IT is hard (Score 1) 192

not to mention banks of giant capacitors to keep your voltage and current in phase, reclosers and other safety systems to enable quick recovery from interruptions due to small trees or animals on the line, and humans who can respond quickly to more severe and dangerous problems.

Comment: Re:*sigh* (Score 1) 358

by siriuskase (#46807743) Attached to: Google: Better To Be a 'B' CS Grad Than an 'A+' English Grad

There was a time when IBM preferred to hire Liberal Arts majors and teach them to code than to hire CS majors. Not sure how IBM hires now, but coding doesn't require a CS degree. All it needs is someone who doesn't mind spending lots of time writing detailed instructions and can tease unambiguous specifications out of the managers. If anything, it should be easier for someone without a CS degree to code now that the languages are becoming more idiot proof. Not that Liberal Arts people are idiots. But, hiring managers are if all they know how to do is hire CS majors for every job that involves using a computer.

Comment: Re:They're just avoiding liability (Score 1) 332

by siriuskase (#46806649) Attached to: Why Portland Should Have Kept Its Water, Urine and All

Urine may be mostly harmless, but if someone can get close enough to pee, they can get close enough to dump small quantities of something else. It sounds like the reservoir has a security problem, not a urine problem. Now that it has been publicized, the government is open to lawsuits or even false alarms from people who want to cause trouble without actually going anywhere near the water.

Comment: Bigger, faster, cheaper, or smaller (Score 1) 276

People are much better at thinking of what we already have and making it better in quantifiable directions. That is what that Byte cover is showing, what we already had, just smaller. So called "disruptive" changes, where we go off in a new direction, is much harder to predict, but when it's done, we get the "why didn't someone think of this already" sort of talk. So many companies are focused on optimizing what we already have instead of playing with ideas without a ROI that is obvious to the people controlling the money. That's why I think technology companies should be managed by engineers and people who read a lot of sci fi.

Comment: Re:Alfalfa (Score 1) 545

by siriuskase (#46458363) Attached to: Meat Makes Our Planet Thirsty

It literally said "exporting water". Only way to make it true is to consider evaporation to be a form of exportation, maybe if the wind blows it into another jurisdiction. Sounds to me that they should recapture the water in the curing barn if they can't encourage it to rain again within their watershed.

In the meantime, I'll make a point of not eating crop grown in California, plenty of locally grown around here, except for pistachios and I can get them from outside of California, too. That would do more to reduce water consumption in California than the Asian alfalfa export argument since I'm not in Asia and can't influence the consumption of alfalfa in Asia. But, what about the California economy? Seems it would hurt if people stopped farming.

Comment: Illogical (Score 1) 545

by siriuskase (#46457697) Attached to: Meat Makes Our Planet Thirsty

How does it help California for Americans to go vegan when the problem you choose to highlight is alfalfa shipped to Asia? The flow of your post seems to indicate we (Americans who aren't in California) should stop eating any product of California. Then, suddenly you started talking about alfalfa, which I don't eat, and beef, which I require to be grass fed in Georgia. I don't think much California beef gets shipped to the east, it's the cornfed stuff from the Midwest we gotta watch out for.

Comment: The "Full" Report (Score 1) 285

Not much about methodology, but they show more rankings and pretty visualizations

http://www.trinet.com/document... [trinet.com]

Quality of Life is not factored into to Adjusted salary rankings, but is ranked separately. The rankings are almost inversely correlated with Austin in 2nd to last place and Atlanta in last place for Quality of Life.

Comment: Full Report: Quality of Life inversely correlated (Score 2) 285

Big surprise, huh:

http://www.trinet.com/document... [trinet.com]

Quality of Life is not factored in, but is ranked separately. The rankings are almost inversely correlated With Adjusted Salary 1st place winner Austin in 2nd to last place, and 2nd place for Adjusted Salary Atlanta in dead last place for quality of life.

Comment: Here's the report, including actual salaries (Score 1) 1

http://www.trinet.com/document...

Quality of Life is not factored in, but is ranked separately. The rankings are almost inversely correlated With Adjusted Salary 1st place winner Austin in 2nd to last place, and 2nd place for Adjusted Salary Atlanta in dead last place for quality of life.

Comment: Re:What's the difference? (Score 1) 462

by siriuskase (#46255455) Attached to: Facebook Debuts New Gender Options, Pronoun Choices

Terms are poorly defined because a lot of issues are still being worked out. Language tends to lag. People work things out for themselves privately. But when they want to discuss things, they need labels. Originally, all the labels were ugly medical sounding terms (or worse) that imply they are sick or immoral, in need of a cure, not just different. Words with healthy connotations did not exist. So when they go public, they must invent words. People don't all invent the same words even for the same situation and not everyone in the sexual configuration discussion has the same situation. The "normals" frequently aren't aware of the issues at all until they encounter the words, then society at large works on these issues, and eventually the terminology stabilizes. It takes awhile.

Comment: Re:What's the difference? (Score 1) 462

by siriuskase (#46255253) Attached to: Facebook Debuts New Gender Options, Pronoun Choices

Stop whining and just live the life you were given.

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.

--George Bernard Shaw

What fucking horseshit.
Reasonable people do reasonable things and expect others to do the same, unreasonable people do unreasonable things and expect others to do the same.
Making the world change in an unreasonable way does not beget progress.

Unreasonable people expect everyone else to do and think exactly like themselves, and consider anyone who does and thinks rationally, but differently, to be unreasonable and irrational. Reasonable people know that in real life, there is usually more than one correct answer.

Scientists are people who build the Brooklyn Bridge and then buy it. -- William Buckley

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