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Comment: Look at the text of the Bill... (Score 1) 239

by sircastor (#36455056) Attached to: Senate Bill Could Make It Illegal To Upload Lip-Synced Videos
So, this the text of the bill. Namely the text which would be added

‘(A) the offense consists of 10 or more public performances by electronic means, during any 180-day period, of 1 or more copyrighted works; and

‘(B)(i) the total retail value of the performances, or the total economic value of such public performances to the infringer or to the copyright owner, would exceed $2,500; or

‘(ii) the total fair market value of licenses to offer performances of those works would exceed $5,000;’; and"

It looks to me like this bill simply provides a punishment for profitable public performances of a copyrighted work. Lip-synching only qualifies here because presumably you're playing the song while you mime the lyrics. It's distribution of a copyrighted work. It has nothing to do with Lip-syncing. That's merely an example of one possible infringement. IMO, this is pretty poor journalism. Also, (again as near as I can tell) this applies to work where there is actual retail profit. B and C lay it out: "Total retail value", "Total economic value" or "Total Fair Market Value" greater than a few thousand dollars. This keeps people from riding their way up the fame wave on someone else's song without some sort of compensation.

All that said, I don't think we need to further enable IP abuse. I hope this one gets thrown out in committee.

Comment: Socially Responsible? (Score 1) 686

by sircastor (#35963322) Attached to: EFF Advocates Leaving Wireless Routers Open
Socially responsible. There's a term that makes me shiver. Let's just write it into a law so I don't even have a choice anymore. I appreciate open wireless networks when I'm away from my home. A business expects that I'll use their services and that's an incentive to bring me to them. If I open up my network to ever joe who walks past my house (or lives next to it) then I'm deincentivizing them getting their own service. Depending on how good my wifi is I might be encouraging 3 or 4 neighbors to simply hitch a ride on my dime. Usually I'll get behind the EFF on a lot of things, this is not one of them. If you do want to provide some open wireless, setup a separate network and apply some strong access rules to it.

Comment: Flash on Android... No thanks (Score 1) 436

by sircastor (#35821562) Attached to: Flash On Android Fails To Impress
I have a little bit of flash functionality on my Galaxy S. For the most part, it's just obnoxious. The flash stuff that I've wanted to use isn't properly developed to function well on a phone. It doesn't resize well, it's interaction with tapping is mixed. Missing flash on my phone is a non-issue. I'm comfortable leaving flash to my desktop thanks.

Comment: Re:Ridiculous (Score 1) 459

by sircastor (#34876666) Attached to: Is Samsung Blocking Updates To Froyo?

The answer wasn't clear though. The Nexus One was "discontinued" the same week the Vibrant came out. All reports seemed to suggest that Google was getting out of the phone business altogether. The Nexus One had served it's purpose in encouraging better hardware for Android. That same month Eric Schmidt said Google would not be releasing a followup phone to the Nexus One.

So yes, it sounds like a good idea to buy Google, but at the time this particular phone was being sold that was totally impractical. The Nexus One was a generation behind in hardware and looking like it wasn't going to be around for more than another couple of weeks. Would you have bought a Nexus One knowing that? Especially if you were told Froyo was coming for this brand new phone in a matter of months?

Comment: Ridiculous (Score 1) 459

by sircastor (#34872084) Attached to: Is Samsung Blocking Updates To Froyo?

I was concerned about something like this. The Behold II stopped at 1.6, despite only being on the market for a mere 9 months. I bought the Vibrant with the expectation the 2.2 was coming within a few months. That's what I was told. Then it was October, then it was December.

According to Cnet Samsung has said that they're still doing testing to make sure it works well. This is absurd. Is it going to take another year for us to move onto Gingerbread?

I bought this phone thinking that I was going to get a great phone with all of the features advertised. The GPS is still garbage *when* it works. "Media Hub" does nothing, even after being activated it doesn't work. These problems should have been solved before the phone was released.

Comment: Not disappointed (Score 1) 762

by sircastor (#34593128) Attached to: Stargate Universe Cancelled

I initially liked SG:U. I thought it was a good, clever mix of BSG and ST:VOY. I liked the characters, I liked the issues they were facing.

Then season 2 came along. It seemed all of the good-will and constructive storyline was thrown out the window. The show just got weirded, and I stopped watching. I'm not sad SGU was cancelled, I'm sad that they took it the direction they did...

Comment: Broken record (Score 3, Interesting) 311

by sircastor (#32963594) Attached to: Times Paywall Blocks 90% of Traffic

Yup: Paywall bad idea. They will reap the consequences, blah blah blah.

The hardest thing they're going to have to learn to grasp in new media economics is that it's not just their business model that's changing. It's not just that they're going to have to stop expecting people to pay for their services like they did before. Their entire industry is going through a massive shift. Personally, the only way I see newspapers surviving is that they become tremendously small outfits. 10-man operations that produce solely for the web and offer a print-on-demand version for those who are interested. Your staff of a dozen reporters and the hundred people who support them aren't going to last here. Print journalism as an industry just can't support those people the way it used to.

Is journalism dead? No. But I think massive news companies are. Journalists and the "Ace Reporter" are going to become free agents. Newspapers are going to become aggregators of the information they collect, and they'll likely have to secure a story with a fee or a retainer. I have sympathy for the people whose jobs are disappearing, but I think every time a job disappears, a new industry grows and more jobs are created.

In a semi-related note, I think that DC should do a Superman storyline where Clark gets laid-off because the Planet can't support his job anymore.

Comment: I would be embarrassed... (Score 1) 344

by sircastor (#31875374) Attached to: 3rd Grader Accused of Hacking Schools' Computer System
... If I were the school's network admin, or even the district tech person. Granted that this may be a matter of simply finding a password/watching a password. I remember when I was in 6th grade, we had a teacher who would hunt and peck his way through is password. It was easy enough to catch it.
Piracy

App Store Piracy Losses Estimated At $459 Million 202

Posted by Soulskill
from the arrr-me-hearties dept.
An anonymous reader passes along this quote from a report at 24/7 Wall St.: "There have been over 3 billion downloads since the inception of the App Store. Assuming the proportion of those that are paid apps falls in the middle of the Bernstein estimate, 17% or 510 million of these were paid applications. Based on our review of current information, paid applications have a piracy rate of around 75%. That supports the figure that for every paid download, there have been 3 pirated downloads. That puts the number of pirate downloads at 1.53 billion. If the average price of a paid application is $3, that is $4.59 billion dollars in losses split between Apple and the application developers. That is, of course, assuming that all of those pirates would have made purchases had the application not been available to them for free. This is almost certainly not the case. A fair estimate of the proportion of people who would have used the App Store if they did not use pirated applications is about 10%. This estimate yields about $459 million in lost revenue for Apple and application developers." A response posted at Mashable takes issue with some of the figures, particularly the 75% piracy rate. While such rates have been seen with game apps, it's unclear whether non-game apps suffer the same fate.

Comment: Re:eeebuntu? (Score 1) 1012

by sircastor (#29964366) Attached to: Mac OS X 10.6.2 Will Block Atom Processors
In some cases, it's the challenge. In other cases, it's a need - you want to have a mac, but don't have the money to spend on one. Some cases it's a way of sticking it to Apple for not selling hardware that we want to buy (a mid-range tower.) There are a lot of reasons. I wanted to give my wife a unique gift, so I put an intel miniITX into a G4 Cube case... I still wanted her to have a mac so I went that direction. In any case, the point is to have and be able to use OS X. It's almost never about choosing "the best" OS. If that really were the case, we all (Hackintoshers) would have sucked it up and gone out and bought Apple hardware and saved ourselves the trouble.

Behind every great computer sits a skinny little geek.

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