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Earth

Submission + - Underwater Ocean Kites to Harvest Tidal Energy (cnn.com)

eldavojohn writes: A Swedish start up has acquired funding for beginning scale model trials of underwater kites secured to a turbine that harness tidal energy for power. The company reports that the kite device allows the attached turbine to harvest energy at ten times the speed of the actual tidal current. With a 12 meter wingspan on the kite, the company says they could harvest 500 kilowatts while it's operational. This novel new design is one of many in which a start up or university hope to turn the ocean into a renewable energy source.
Medicine

Submission + - Harvard Restarts Heart Outside Body (singularityhub.com)

kkleiner writes: Prof. Hemant Thattle at Harvard has developed a cocktail of 21 chemical compounds that he calls Somah, derived from the sanskrit for “ambrosia of rejuvenation”. Using Somah, Thattle and his team have accomplished some amazing feats with pig hearts. They can keep the organ viable for transplant up to 10 days after harvest – that’s incredibly longer than the 4 hour limit seen in hospitals today. Not only that, but using low temperatures and Somah, they were able to take a pig heart that was removed post mortem and get it to beat 24 hours later in the lab.
Microsoft

Submission + - SPAM: No end in sight for anti-virus software problems

viral.Windows writes: With AV vendors trapped in a game they can never win—virus writers will always outpace them—this is, then, a problem that shows no sign of being solved anytime soon. Though some false positives shouldn't have happened, and McAfee really should have tested against Windows XP Service Pack 3, such problems will unfortunately continue to be a fact of anti-virus life.
Link to Original Source

Feed Science Daily: PET Scan Distinguishes Alzheimer's From Other Dementia (sciencedaily.com)

A PET scan that measures uptake of sugar in the brain significantly improves the accuracy of diagnosing a type of dementia often mistaken for Alzheimer's disease, a new study has found. The scan, FDG-PET, helped six doctors from three national Alzheimer's disease centers correctly diagnose frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's in almost 90 percent of cases.

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