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Comment: Re:Yes, I am. (Score 1) 678

by sidragon.net (#43674489) Attached to: US Senate Passes Internet Tax Bill 69 To 27

I'm confused by your claims. First, you're telling me sales tax is regressive even though it's proportionate to consumption (the wealthy tend to purchase more, and more expensive goods). Second, you're then asking me accept that closing a tax loophole used primarily by the wealthy makes the sales tax increasingly regressive. How do you figure?

Of course, we can argue this point until we're blue in our faces, but one thing is certain: if we're going to have a tax law, we ought to apply it consistently so that no group may escape it. For the moment, it's politically unfeasible to eliminate the sales tax, so whether I'm tapping away on my iPhone or walking into my local Wal-Mart should make no difference to how I'm taxed.

Comment: Yes, I am. (Score 1) 678

by sidragon.net (#43654999) Attached to: US Senate Passes Internet Tax Bill 69 To 27

As I should be. Imposing a sales tax on in-store purchases but not online is fundamentally regressive. But there's no need to make the argument all over again here. Visit http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2013/04/22/1900551/how-closing-the-online-sales-tax-loophole-would-help-low-income-families/ and read the sourced articles.

Comment: Re:Oops. (Score 1) 190

by sidragon.net (#43645257) Attached to: CSS Selectors as Superpowers

Your comment's an admission that you didn't read my supporting material--material that unequivocally demonstrates that W3Schools is full of junk information. Beginners should not be taught the wrong way to use a technology, and they should not be taught things that are outright false.

I've been developing web applications for well over a decade. Try again.

Comment: What are you even talking about? (Score 2) 37

by sidragon.net (#43456341) Attached to: Google's BigQuery Vs. Hadoop: a Matchup

[I]nstead of a dialog, this post got a -1.

You're talking about politics and conspiracy theories in an article about big data. Yes, that is off topic.

Why does the Internet always have to be about "monetization"? I'd like to see open, standards-compliant offerings that are truly "free" as in freedom and very low cost...

You're living in a dreamland. Like it or not, electricity, hardware, and wires cost money.

I'm hoping Firefox OS proves to be one of these. Let's hope as a non-profit...

FYI, Mozilla Foundation is funded, in large part, by Google.

Look at OpenBSD, for example. Not much better in terms of a secure server environment.

And it has scant adoption. Meanwhile, the rest of us are charging ahead and getting stuff done with steadily advancing tools rather than messing around with arcane operating systems that have 10-year-old feature sets.

Comment: Thanks. (Score 1) 252

by sidragon.net (#43363563) Attached to: Blink! Google Is Forking WebKit

In addition to testing on Trident 8, 9, and 10; Gecko; and WebKit, we've now got to add Servo and Blink! to the pile. Thanks, Mozilla and Google, for making my job as a web developer much harder! Yay! Innovation! And when we come out the other end, we'll have HTML5! Well, uh, sort of, I guess. The existing engines aren't all standards compliant. But I'm sure these new ones will be better. Hurray for progress!

Comment: Re:Stop it, stop it, stop it! (Score 1, Insightful) 111

What concepts does Rust introduce that aren't already present in the latest C++ standard? Which aren't already present in Scala? Which aren't already present in Go? Do you really want me to believe that memory safety, concurrency, generics, and exception handling present in half-a-dozen off-the-shelf (and mature) languages weren't sufficient? (And let's not forget that every new language departs from existing tool chains that service to multiply development efforts.)

I'll say it for the umpteenth time on Slashdot: why do we need dozens of half-baked projects instead of a few that are exceptionally solid? And I'll, again, give my own answer: because every one of these geeks who designs to start his own little, duplicative project thinks he's smarter than everyone else. You know, because those guys are idiots, and we couldn't possibly build upon their work. Greenfield development is always fun! (Am I right?)

But let's forget all that for the moment, and concentrate on our shiny new browser engine. If and only if this project is successful when all is said and done, it will produce exactly the same output as its siblings and predecessors--output that's dictated by standards. Indeed, after devoting person-years worth of hard labor, we will end up with something with exactly the same functionality as what we had before.

Sigh. Obligatory XKCD.

http://xkcd.com/927/

Comment: Re:Stop it, stop it, stop it! (Score 2) 111

The thousand year old wheels doesn't work very well for traveling at 60mph.

Our wheels aren't a thousand years old. They're barely even a few.

There is a good reason to reinvent the wheel over and over again.

Ignoring the fact that this analogy has broken down into uselessness, let's talk about this new browser engine. Is it going to conform to the existing standards and produce output identical to its predecessor?

Comment: Stop making this an emotional issue. (Score 1) 587

by sidragon.net (#43348009) Attached to: Samoa Air Rolling Out "Pay As You Weigh" Fares

Moving mass requires energy. The amount of energy required increases in proportion to the mass. Energy used by an airplane is supplied by fuel that costs money. More mass, more fuel, more money. Full stop. This has nothing to do with health, or discrimination, or anything else besides the laws of physics.

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