Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Submission Summary: 1 pending, 20 declined, 9 accepted (30 total, 30.00% accepted)

+ - GMO food proved almost harmless by a huge volume of data->

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "A new research suggests there are no ill effects from GMO ingredients for the billions of animals fed for slaughter. In particular, data on livestock productivity and health were collated from publicly available sources from 1983, before the introduction of GE crops in 1996, and subsequently through 2011, a period with high levels of predominately GE animal feed. These field data sets representing over 100 billion animals following the introduction of GE crops did not reveal unfavorable or perturbed trends in livestock health and productivity. Anti-GMO luddites expected to announce that animals are slaughtered too early to tell later today."
Link to Original Source

+ - A second group of Fukushima residents are allowed to return to evacuation zone.->

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "A group of people who lived within the 20-kilometer restricted zone surrounding the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant are asked to return home, the second time the "right of return" has been granted, despite opposition to the government decision by residents and medical researchers."
Link to Original Source

+ - Russian city of Chelyabinsk hit by a meteorite, 500+ injured from the blast wave->

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "The Russian city of Chelyabinsk was apparently hit by a meteorite today. The meteorite disintegrated over the city, causing an explosion that broke windows and apparently lead to hundreds of injuries. More videos from the event here: http://www.lenta.ru/articles/2013/02/15/meteorite/"
Link to Original Source
Japan

+ - Japanese "cyber crime" suspect arrested for petting a stray cat->

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "A man was arrested this morning in Tokyo because he was videotaped approaching a famous stray cat in the popular tourist destination of Enoshima near Tokyo.

The animal was used some months ago to deliver (via an SD card strapped to its leash) a message ridiculing the cyber crime unit of the Japanese police for their failure to apprehend a "hacker", who posted "threatening messages" to several popular boards.

The investigation of the pranks since October last year has so far resulted in four arrests of innocent people."

Link to Original Source

+ - Room Temperature Superconductivity Found in Graphite Grains->

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "Here's an interesting recipe. Take a spoonful of graphite powder and stir it into a glass of water. Leave for 24 hours at room temperature and then filter the powder. Finally, bake overnight at 100 degrees C and allow to cool.

And voila! A material that superconducts at over 300 kelvin--room temperature. At least that's the claim today from Pablo Esquinazi and buddies at the University of Leipzig in Germany."

Link to Original Source
Power

+ - Fukushima One Year Later: Reality Check FAQ->

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "The Asahi Shimbun has published a rather thorough and readable Q&A article, which is addressing many frequently asked questions about the consequences of the radioactive pollution that followed the accident.

Answers are given by Mariko Takahashi, a writer with the paper, who is, according to the introduction, "well-versed" in the issues at hand."

Link to Original Source

+ - Electricity rationing in Tokyo-> 1

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "The TV in Tokyo is just announcing a schedule for electricity blackouts to last from tomorrow until the end of April.

Practically all suburbs of Tokyo will be affected by the blackouts. The 23 districts of central Tokyo seem to be exempt for the moment, but if supply is not sufficient, blackouts are possible.

Electricity will be interrupted for about 3 hours a day in each area."

Link to Original Source

+ - File organization - how do you do it? 4

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "After 30 years of being around computers, I have, like everyone else, amassed a huge amount of files in huge amount of formats about a huge amount of topics. And it isn't only me — the family has now a ton of data that they want managed and easily accessible.

Keeping all that information in order has always been a pain, but it has gone harder as the storage has increased and people and files and sizes have multiplied.

What do you folks use to keep your odd terabyte of document, picture, video and code files organized — that is, relatively uniformly tagged, versioned, searchable and ultimately findable, without 50 duplicates over your 50 devices and without typing arcane commands in a terminal window?

I found this discussion from 2003 and this tangentially relevant post from 2006. How have things changed for you in 2011?

And how satisfied is your extended family with the solution you have unleashed upon them?"
Apple

+ - Apple bans online sales in Japan->

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "Japanese big retail stores were ordered a week or so ago to stop selling Apple products online. The comments in the Japanese business newspapers suggest that Apple believes online shopping adds an aura of "cheapness" to their products, but killing the competition of the Apple store has surely been considered as well. As of today, most of the largest retailers have notices on their Apple catalog pages that ask you to kindly visit the shop if you want to acquire a piece of magic. It seems that for the moment the campaign is aimed at the big fish, as smaller shops still seem to carry and sell Apple items.

(Link goes to a google translate of the commentary of cnet japan, this is the original in Japanese)."

Link to Original Source
Science

+ - Quantum effects behind photosynthesis efficiency->

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "Wired has a fascinating story about a recent discovery that sheds light on the quantum physics mechanisms behind the efficiency of photosynthesis. Antenna proteins appear to "use" quantum effects to route energy almost without loss from photon-sensitive molecules to nearby reaction-center proteins, which convert it to cell-driving charges. As a bonus, the article provides a car analogy."
Link to Original Source
Space

+ - Herschel telescope sees first light->

Submitted by siddesu
siddesu (698447) writes "Herschel, the infra-red space telescope, opened its eyes on 14 June 2009, precisely one month after the launch. It carried out test observations labeled a 'sneak preview' making use of time initially allocated to 'thermal stabilization', following a request to attempt producing an early observational result. Here's the first pictures and more."
Link to Original Source

It is not for me to attempt to fathom the inscrutable workings of Providence. -- The Earl of Birkenhead

Working...