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Comment Re:alternately: (Score 2, Interesting) 492

Google pays their technical staff extremely well. The problem is that Bay Area housing prices are astronomical, and it's pretty hard to get ahead when you're paying out several thousand dollars of after-tax money every month just to rent a room in a shared house.

I suspect that this guy will only be able to live this way for a year or so - either Google will step in and ask him to move his truck (especially if others get similar ideas) or he'll grow tired of his spartan living arrangements once he's paid off his student loans and will return to more standard living arrangements.

It seems, however, that there's a business opportunity for someone who offers micro-apartments with shared common spaces (like some college dorm designs, where four or five people have extremely compact private bedrooms but there's a shared den/kitchen/bathroom. Figure out a way to squeeze it into the size of a moderately sized standard apartment and offer it at a reasonable rate.

Comment Re:why review? (Score 4, Informative) 125

This isn't a situation where they're randomly suing reviewers. Amazon is suing people who (a) posted an offer to submit a fake Amazon review in exchange for payment, (b) received payment, and (c) posted a fake review.

Published reviews should be restricted to people who have actually purchased the product from Amazon, especially with items that cost a significant amount. That would dramatically cut down fraud. As it is, Amazon reviews tend to be most effective when there are a few hundred or thousands for a product and the product is in the $50+ range. In those cases, it can be highly educational to read through the reviews because people often highlight product flaws and provide advice and workarounds for common problems.

Comment ASUS tends to abandon hardware quickly (Score 4, Insightful) 87

I have an ASUS Memo Pad 10 FHD, that has served me pretty well for just over a year. My one complaint is that the company stopped supporting it way too early (it's running Android 4.3), and this seems to be standard practice. My next tablet will be Nexus or Apple, simply because that should provide me with 2-3 years of OS updates. That little bonus is worth an extra $100 or so to me.

Comment Re:Wrong! (Score 1) 485

Flags have been around for ages, too.

Possibly not as long as you think. The UK, for example, has the second oldest flag in the world and it dates from the beginning of the 19th century (Denmark has the oldest).

Comment Re:First things first. (Score 4, Interesting) 842

Next thing I do (after buying a house, of course) is start studying accountancy, because if I've learned anything from reading the news the past several years, it's that NOBODY can be trusted with that many zeroes.

After that, I've got friends who need help, and who deserve it much more than I do. I want to see them happy. Then I can start worrying about businesses and philanthropy and shit like that.

You're overthinking this. Read The Four Pillars of Investing by William Bernstein. Invest your money sensibly. Make sure that all your eggs aren't in one basket - invest with a number of different firms and with a broad portfolio. Pay attention to annual performance and ask questions.

Then look after your friends, although you'll discover that everyone looks at you in a different way.

Even when you're wearing your old comfy jeans, they'll look at your feet and see the $800 shoes that you bought because they're the most freakishly comfortable things you've ever put on your feet. Your Aston Martin key fob will start unwanted conversations with TSA screeners every time you pass through security (they all seem to think that a Ferrari 458 would be a much more sensible choice than a 4-door sedan).

Meeting people gets a bit awkward. They'll ask where you live and you'll tell them, "Just out of town, near the river," hoping that they won't ask the next question, which is, "Oh! How many acres? Three? Four?" You'll lower your voice as you start apologetically - "A hundred and sixty. But we have horses..." It's not the sort of attention an introvert enjoys.

Comment Re:20% slowdown isn't that bad... (Score 1) 128

Vista wasn't crippled by processor speed, anyway, it was crippled by being installed on low RAM systems. That and having lots of shit services running as default.

I'm still typing from my almost 10 year old Vista system on which I play Elite : Dangerous and a whole host of other new games. The graphics card is newer.

Comment Re:Me and some political prisoner in Iran (Score 1) 114

You acquire knowledge through reading; through either written words or equations on the page. Knowledge acquistion for humans is inherently and forever a process of abstract symbol processing- we process speech and scratches on a page and transform it into understanding. That's as natural as breathing. Plain text is the once and a future king of the internet.

Suer[sic] somethings are better demonstrated than explained verbally. No one is arguing with that.

It seems like you are.

Writing is a new invention in terms of the history of humanity. A hundred thousand year old caveman could (in theory) understand a youtube video in a language they knew, but they could not read anything. They could also get something from a youtube video even if they did not understand the language. You can't get anything from text if you don't understand it.

Comment Re:I agree (Score 1) 114

There's far more on Wikipedia alone now than there was on the the web in totality in the early days. If you don't like adverts, and just like information, you can just use wikipedia now.

Yes, I'm saying that Wikipedia (one site) now is better (much better) than the entire web used to be.

If you don't like the sites that you're seeing, close the window (or tab). No one is forcing you to go to sites that you do not like.

Comment Re:Ball tracking is not new (Score 1) 68

Cricket is actually a poor comparison as Hawkeye is used to predict where the ball would have gone

That's just one thing that hawkeye does in cricket. To be out leg before wicket in cricket, the ball cannot have pitched outside leg stump. Also to be out lbw when playing a shot, the ball must not have hit the batter outside off stump, which is also checked for. Both of these examples check where the ball has been, and decisions are often overturned on these things.

Also, if the umpire's decision is not out, and the ball is just clipping the stumps (or very close in another area), the umpire's decision is upheld - hawkeye does not overrule the umpire when the decision is close.

Make it right before you make it faster.