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Comment: Re:Expensive and complicated? (Score 1) 97

by shmlco (#47931987) Attached to: How Flickr Is Courting the Next Generation of Photographers

"... photo development was cheap and common enough to fully automate at a kiosk in the mall."

And why, pray tell, would someone who cared about photographic quality process film and make prints at a kiosk in the mall? Crappy processing and crappy prints, and with automated printing and color correction you have no idea as to what the hell went wrong (or right) with your images.

Shoot pro-grade E100, or Velvia, and you paid $10-12 per roll of film plus $10/roll commercial processing, or at least $20/roll combined. Shoot a dozen rolls at an event, and you just blew through $250 in 1980's dollars.

So yeah, I'd call it "pricey".

Comment: Re:Trust us with your payments (Score 4, Informative) 730

by shmlco (#47866937) Attached to: Apple Announces Smartwatch, Bigger iPhones, Mobile Payments

You take a picture of the card and that information is used to confirm with the bank that you're the card holder. The phone then gets a digital certificate that stored in the encrypted enclave and the photo is zapped. No credit card data is stored on the phone, nor on Apple's servers.

When you go to buy something the phone uses the cert to generate a one-time token and security code that's given to the merchant terminal via NFC and unlocked via TouchID.

The merchant doesn't get a name, doesn't get a card number, doesn't get a security code, and doesn't get a pin number, and as such, the thing is about a million times more secure than the existing magnetic swipe card system.

Comment: Re:Do electric cars actually produce CO2? (Score 1) 330

And all that's not the point. Again, all of that technology could be used in a hybrid in order to make the hybrid more efficient. Once developed, it can be copied or licensed and put into a hybrid that gets 100 MPG instead of the 50 you get now, or the 50 mpg a "SkyActiv" ICE-only car produces. Or even 150-200 mpg, once you factor in PHEV systems and conponents.

As to wheel bearings, drag, transmissions, power take-off components (A/C, Alternator), and so on, that's part and parcel of hybrid technology, and for that matter, electric vehicles in general. (Go look up how GM talked about having to make new low-power windshield-wiper motors for the Volt.)

Comment: Re:Do electric cars actually produce CO2? (Score 1) 330

You could also take all of the wonderful high-compression ICE l technology that Mazda is doing and put THAT into a Prius, giving us higher efficiency when in gas mode and still getting the benefits of electric power drive, assist, and regenerative braking in stop-and-go traffic.

Comment: Re:FAR better than fossil fuels, and even better t (Score 1) 191

by shmlco (#46268135) Attached to: Elon Musk Says Larger Batteries Might Be On the Way

"...2002 UltraPortable, 3600 mAh in 330 grams. In 2014 the extended battery [amazon.com] for the Sony Vaio Pro 11 is 4690 mAh in 290 grams, that's about a 75% increase in power/gram in 12 years."

Most of the difference is that older batteries were pretty much just a set of AA-sized batteries wrapped into a plastic shell. Modern computers often use pressed and formed LiPo batteries that allow for more "battery" in the same amount of space.

Others, like Apple, carry it a step further and completely eliminate the plastic shell used in removable batteries. I'll leave the math as an exercise for the reader, but you'd be surprised at just how much volume you gain by simply extending your battery size by 4mm in every dimension.

Comment: Re:Good (Score 1) 414

by shmlco (#45651619) Attached to: 3-D Printed Gun Ban Fails In Senate

As pointed out above, it's unlikely that the person who commits the crime is the one that is actually producing the weapons. Thus what the law actually does is make it illegal to own, produce, sell, or distribute guns that would violate the law. Which in turn restricts the supply and makes it harder for a criminal to obtain them.

Without it, you not only have to worry about 3D-print shops mass-producing weapons, but also the possibility of, say, Glock deciding to make and market a polymer/ceramic "undetectable" firearm. Something that, in both cases, would dramatically increase the supply of such weapons on the street and as such, increase the likelihood of them being used in a crime.

Finally, and by your own admission regarding ammunition (BTW, ever heard of ceramics?), even a plastic gun would be better off, not to mention more reliable, with a metal firing pin, metal springs, metal screws, and so on. So the net result is that the law would have no impact whatsoever on the "honest" hobbyist, while at the same time restricting the proliferation of weapons designed solely to defeat existing security systems.

Comment: Re:Good (Score 1) 414

by shmlco (#45651455) Attached to: 3-D Printed Gun Ban Fails In Senate

Austrailia? Sorry, been reading too many NRA talking-point bulletins. Try: http://www.gunfaq.org/2013/03/the-misuse-of-our-gun-crime-stats/

As to the Third Reich, according to the census of June 16, 1933, the Jewish population of Germany was approximately 505,000 people out of a total population of 67 million, or somewhat less than 0.75 percent.

Further, by the time Germany invaded Poland, roughly half of the Jewish population had emigrated out of Germany. At the wars end, 142,000 German Jews were killed in the Holocaust. As such, a) a German weapons law didn't disarm Poland, b) Hitler liberalized gun laws for Germans who by and large supported the regime and c) the Polish army was run over from the East by the Germans and the West by the Soviets.

So, roughly 250,000 men, woman, and children? Outnumbered over 200-to-1 in a state that overwhelmingly supported the Nazi party, and by a military machine that took the combined might of over half the planet to stop and bring down?

Yep. A few more hunting rifles and shotguns would have made all the difference...

Comment: Re:How? (Score 1) 414

by shmlco (#45651373) Attached to: 3-D Printed Gun Ban Fails In Senate

Got to love these carefully reasoned screeds... that completely miss the point.

See, the thing is that it's unlikely that the person who commits the crime is the one that is actually producing the weapons. Thus what the law actually does is make it illegal to own, produce, sell, or distribute guns that would violate the law. Which in turn restricts the supply and makes it harder for a criminal to obtain them.

Without it, you not only have to worry about 3D-print shops mass-producing weapons, but also the possibility of, say, Glock deciding to make and market a polymer/ceramic "undetectable" firearm. Something that, in both cases, would dramatically increase the supply of such weapons on the street and as such, increase the likelihood of them being used in a crime.

Finally, the law is itself in the public interest, as there's little to no public benefit in allowing people or companies to produce "plastic" weapons designed solely to circumvent security checkpoints.

Physician: One upon whom we set our hopes when ill and our dogs when well. -- Ambrose Bierce

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