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We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

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Comment: Re:correlation, causation (Score 1) 387

by shmibs (#47600979) Attached to: Ancient Skulls Show Civilization Rose As Testosterone Fell
The real problem here is the use of the term "feminist". When a person chooses to label himself as "part of X", it is natural that others will associate his actions with other people who have done the same, regardless of whether he actually agrees with them. I choose not to "identify as an atheist", because it would associate me with those who take the stance that religious people should be shot. There is nothing to be gained from self-applying the label and quite a bit to lose. Some labels cannot be avoided so easily. I can't just stop being "that tranny", for example, because it's not a label i choose for myself, and members of Islam cannot just stop calling themselves Islamic as it is a necessary part of their belief system. "Feminist", however, is almost entirely a self-applied term (though there are some feminists out there who actively force it on others. /me points at "find a feminist in popular culture and explain your reasoning" 'women's studies' homework assignments :P). There is nothing to be gained (and quite a bit to lose) from labeling your charity as a "feminist charity". Rather than choosing whether or not to donate based on the merits of the cause, some people will read the name and immediately discount any work being done. Let your actions speak for you rather than some meaningless label.

Comment: Stop Using Laptops (Score 1) 459

by shmibs (#46007609) Attached to: Stop Trying To 'Innovate' Keyboards, You're Just Making Them Worse
The best solution is to just replace your laptop with something more modular. Get a NUC, or some other small portable computer of the like, an external, usb-powered monitor (look up GeChic), and just use your preferred keyboard. being able to use my HHKB without any keyboard redundancy getting in the way of seeing my screen is the best, and it costs a good deal less as well, as repairs can be made by just replacing a single part rather than getting a new laptop or having to send it in to the manufacturer.

Comment: Re:Prediction: Bad people will use it (Score 1) 262

by shmibs (#38586736) Attached to: German Hackers Propose Uncensorable Global Grid — With Satellites
shouldn't it be up to the "owner" of the information to ensure that others do not obtain that information? as soon as some sort of censorship is placed upon what information people can and cannot share an authority must be appointed to regulate that, an authority that could potentially go on to "regulate" other things at its own discretion. if people want to keep information from being spread, and that information belongs to them, they shouldn't hand it out, and that should be that.

Comment: Re:KDE. (Score 1) 357

by shmibs (#38475766) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Assembling a Linux Desktop Environment From Parts?
true true KDE makes me feel uncomfortable. the system i use instead is a bit more consuming, as it takes bits and pieces from here and there (the xfce panel, with a mint menu, assorted quick launchers, and gnome-panel applets; compiz, nautilus, and a few screenlets. it takes up some 550 megs when idling (7-8 when firefox is running in all it's addon-bedazzled glory), but is definitely worth it. any application i use commonly is either one or two clicks away, and all the others are assorted neatly in the menu, i have all the useful bits of gnome-panel without having to wait for it to start up, nautilus has addons that allow opening in terminal/as administrator simple, and a rabbitvcs plugin, and compiz makes sure that my screenlets end up on the proper desktops, provides transparencies, and reserves a one pixel bar at the left of the screen for easy scrolling with the mouse wheel.

Comment: Re:The Black Death isn't coming back (Score 1) 265

by shmibs (#37269764) Attached to: Scientists Sequence Black Death Bacteria
the thing is, animals here in the us DO need them. they are grown in living conditions which practically guarantee that diseases will spread among them (standing knee deep in their own manure, eating foodstuffs that they cannot properly digest, and being packed by the hundreds into dark, damp areas where they can hardly move without running into one another. they need to have antibiotics pumped into their food supplies just to keep them alive long enough to be slaughtered, and even then a large number of them don't make it. why do you think there have been so many outbreaks of dangerous food contaminations so recently (namely, things like Escherichia coli)? maybe because the food industry is feeding chicken manure to cattle, which then produce heaping mounds of faeces, the run off from which contaminates water supplies and nearbye produce farms...

Comment: Re:College Board (Score 1) 75

by shmibs (#35297280) Attached to: Online Multiplayer Games On TI Calculators?
have you heard of the upcoming TI-Nspire CX? when Casio released the PRIZM, TI realised that they could no longer keep their sway on the market while selling twenty-year-old hardware. this new model includes: "a full-color, backlit screen, thin sleek design and includes TI-Nspire rechargeable battery. Use images including your own photos. Explore real-world concepts using the handheld's Notes, Graphs, Geometry, Data & Statistics and questions apps. TI-Nspire Teacher Sofware or TI-Nspire student software is required to add images into TI-Nspire documents. Graph and rotate 3D functions. Change the wire or surface color of your 3D graph. Clam shell. " additionally, there will supposedly be an attachable accessory to allow WiFi connection. http://www.ubergizmo.com/2011/01/texas-instruments-brings-wifi-to-ti-nspire-calculators/

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