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Comment: Re:sorry, but this is BS (Score 1) 52

I haven't used the Shield Tablet so I'm not sure (I only have a Jetson TK1, that uses CUDA on Linux). It isn't possible to directly compare CUDA on Tegra K1 versus CUDA on any other mobile device, whereas there are obviously many competing devices supporting OpenCL, so the linked benchmark results are probably the closest thing there is to an apples-to-apples comparison of GPGPU compute performance on Tegra K1 versus all the competition. If a marketing slide on the NVIDIA website said Tegra K1 gets 5x boost in OpenCL compared to the next contendor then I'd understand the skepticism, but the linked results are for the industry-wide standard benchmark used for GPGPU comparisons.

Benchmarks should always be taken with some skepticism, but as an Engineer (not a Marketer) I know that Tegra K1's GPU really does optimize many whole algorithms by around 5x compared to competing mobile devices, so this isn't BS.

Comment: Re:False. (Score 5, Informative) 52

The Anandtech article clearly mentions that OpenCL in Nexus 10 was an unsupported feature that hackers figured out how to use but it wasn't actually intended for developers to use officially, hence why it disappeared soon after an update. So I guess you are right that Tegra K1 is perhaps not the first mobile chip to do GPU accelerated OpenCL, but it is the first one to officially offer it and provide full support to ensure it runs well without bugs and without high power draw, etc.

And yes it's true that the Jetson TK1 embedded Linux board doesn't support OpenCL at all, but that is due to Linux OS related issues. There are only OpenCL drivers for Tegra K1 on Android, not Linux (unfortunately!). That doesn't change the fact that the Tegra K1 chip supports hardware-accelerated OpenCL on Android.

So I don't see either of those 2 points as being false information or dishonest.

+ - NVIDIA Tegra K1: first mobile chip with hardware-accelerated OpenCL->

Submitted by shervinemami
shervinemami (1270718) writes "The latest CompuBench GPU benchmarks show NVIDIA's Tegra K1 running whole OpenCL algorithms around 5x faster than any other mobile device, and individual instructions around 20x faster!

This huge jump is because mobile companies have been saying they support OpenCL on mobile devices since early 2013, but what they don't mention is that they only have software API support, not hardware-accelerated OpenCL running faster on their GPUs than CPUs. Now that NVIDIA's Tegra-K1 chip has started shipping in devices and thus is available for full benchmarking, it is clearly the only mobile chip that actually gives you proper hardware-accelerated OpenCL (and CUDA of course!).

Disclaimer: I'm an Engineer at NVIDIA."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Middle East or just Jordan? (Score 2) 156

by shervinemami (#44281679) Attached to: The Middle East Beats the West In Female Tech Founders

Actually I worked in a university in United Arab Emirates near the border of Oman, and there were about 10x more females studying IT & post-grad in computer or engineering related fields than male students!

We assume it is because the local Emirati's in UAE are so rich that they don't need to study or work, but since females are expected to marry and become a house-wife & mother, the most obvious way for them to not have that way of life is if they become a professional. so we believe this explained why UAE has so many female IT & Engineering students of high quality, but almost no male IT or Engineering students and most of the males there are of very low quality since they are just doing it for fun.

Comment: Re:Contractor (Score 1) 473

by shervinemami (#44021327) Attached to: The $200,000 Software Developer

The only real difference between the US and other first world countries is that in the US what you get for your tax dollar is a military larger than that of the next 17 countries put together; what we get in the rest of the world is free healthcare and free or heavily subsidized tertiary education.

Nice summary of USA :-) I also prefer the free healthcare & education rather than a powerful military, but I guess that's because I'm not American!

Comment: Re:Optical Zoom (Score 1) 257

by shervinemami (#43445599) Attached to: What's Next For Smartphone Innovation

But phones don't have to be so small that they can't fit proper camera hardware. I already carry a 1/2" digicam in my pocket, so I'd be happy to replace it with a 1/2" phone that includes a digicam-level lens & camera sensor.

Sure there is always going to be a market for people that want smaller & smaller phones, but also there is a market for people that want phones as large as a digicam, if it means much better camera system, much bigger battery, potentially a larger keypad, and potentially shutter & zoom buttons on the side of the phone so you can actually use it like a digicam.

Technology

Festo's Drone Dragonfly Takes To the Air 45

Posted by samzenpus
from the little-flyer dept.
yyzmcleod writes "Building on the work of last year's bionic creation, the Smart Bird, Festo announced that it will literally launch its latest creation, the BionicOpter, at Hannover Messe in April. With a wingspan of 63 cm and weighing in at 175 grams, the robotic dragonfly mimics all forms of flight as its natural counterpart, including hover, glide and maneuvering in all directions. This is made possible, the company says, by the BionicOpter's ability to move each of its four wings independently, as well as control their amplitude, frequency and angle of attack. Including its actuated head and body, the robot exhibits 13 degrees of freedom, which allows it to rapidly accelerate, decelerate, turn and fly backwards."
Graphics

The Leap Motion Controller is Sort of Like a Super Kinect (Video) 108

Posted by Roblimo
from the touching-nothing-but-a-picture-magically-appears-on-the-screen dept.
What the Leap Motion product (they only have one right now) does is allow you to control your computer with gestures. We're not talking about just jumping around, but "painting" on the screen with your fingers (or even chopsticks) with fine enough control that Autodesk and other drawing-orientd software vendors are working to make applications compatible with the Leap Motion Controller. And game developers? You bet! Lots of them -- and this is for a device that's not even supposed to start shipping until May 13. But, says CEO Michael Buckwald, they already have "hundreds of thousands of pre-orders," so it looks like they are developing a large market for developers (over 12,000 are in the Leap Motion developer program -- out of 50,000 who applied) so it's possible that Leap Motion could become a pretty big deal. (You can see the Leap Motion Controller in action at the end of the video.)
Microsoft

Spanish Open Source Group Files Complaint Over Microsoft Use of UEFI Secure Boot 154

Posted by Soulskill
from the saga-continues dept.
sl4shd0rk writes "Hispalinux, which represents Spanish Open Source developers and users, has filed a complaint against Microsoft with the European Commission. 14 pages of grief cited Windows 8 as an 'obstruction mechanism' calling UEFI Secure Boot a 'de facto technological jail for computer booting systems... making Microsoft's Windows platform less neutral than ever.' On March 6 of 2012 the Commission fined Microsoft 561 million Euros for failing to offer users a choice of web browser, and there was also a 2004 ruling which found the company had abused its market position by tying Windows Media Player to Windows itself. Relations appear to remain more tense towards Windows in Europe, so there may be some hope of making UEFI more Linux-friendly. UEFI has been implicated in the death of Samsung laptops running Linux."
Technology

Ask Slashdot: Why Buy a Raspberry Pi When I Have a Perfectly Good Cellphone? 273

Posted by samzenpus
from the expensive-knock-off dept.
scorp1us writes "I've been looking into getting a Raspberry Pi, but I end up needing a case, a display, and some way to power it, and wanting some degree of portability. It seems to me that even the most outdated cellphone has far superior features (screen, touch screen, Wifi, 3g/4g camera(s), battery etc) in a much better form factor. The only thing that is missing are the digital/analog in/out pins. So why not flip it around and make a USB or bluetooth peripheral board with just the pins? I've been looking for this and can't find any, but does anyone know of any in the corners of the internet? I don't care what phone platform."
Space

How a Guy Found 4 New Planets Without a Telescope 133

Posted by Soulskill
from the he's-just-this-guy,-you-know? dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Peter Jalowiczor is a gas worker from South Yorkshire, England. He's also the discoverer of four giant exoplanets, according to the University of California's Lick-Carnegie Planet Search Team. But he's not an astronomer and he doesn't even have a telescope. '...in 2005, astronomers at the university released millions of space measurements collected over several decades and asked enthusiasts to make of them what they would. ... From March 2007 Peter, 45, spent entire nights reading the data, working the figures, creating graphs. ... He then sent discrepancies he discovered back to the scientists in California where they were further analyzed to see if the quirks were caused by the existence of an exoplanet.'"

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