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Comment: Re:American Exceptionalism (Score 1) 573

by shawnhcorey (#45873231) Attached to: Counterpoint: Why Edward Snowden May Not Deserve Clemency

There is no American law which prevents America from spying on non-Americans. We've signed no treaty that says we won;t spy on foreign countries. That means it is by definition legal for us to do so.

The laws in the article you linked to are all non-American, mostly from the Commonwealth Realms.

So? That's the whole point. American exceptionalism is thinking that Americans can break laws in other countries and get away with it because they're special. That's why the world hates Americans. They have double standards. They can break laws in other countries but if others come to America, woe betides them is they break the law.

Comment: Re:American Exceptionalism (Score 1) 573

by shawnhcorey (#45872757) Attached to: Counterpoint: Why Edward Snowden May Not Deserve Clemency

The US government's job is to know what other governments are doing, therefore it has the power to spy on them. They, in turn, have the power to spy on it. We can argue the ethics of tapping Angie Merkel's phone all day, but you can't argue that there is a single law which gives a Head of Government the right not to be spied on.

Only during times of war. And the US has not legally declared war since WW2. You're making the argument that if everyone does it, it's not illegal.

And for those of you who are too lazy to use Google, here's some of the laws I'm talking about.

Comment: Re:Brain Dead (Score 1) 159

by shawnhcorey (#45416239) Attached to: Red Hat Releases Ceylon Language 1.0.0
Consider: int x; What happens here? x = 3.1415; Does x hold the correct value? No. But if x was a scalar, then: x = int( 3.1415 ); says exactly what is happening. Type safety places restrictions on what can be done and programmer have to memorize the rules because they're not natural to his thinking. It's because of all the things that programmers have to memorize that programming is hard. The more things a programmer have to remember, the more bugs he will create. Having to write int() every time he wants an integer: 1. decreases bugs, and 2. makes the code more readable. Types are not natural; they were created to make compiler writing easier. They do not make programming easier, just the opposite. They make programming harder because the force the programmer to remember more things.

Comment: Brain Dead (Score -1) 159

by shawnhcorey (#45415415) Attached to: Red Hat Releases Ceylon Language 1.0.0
Any language that has strict typing is brain dead. People do not think in types. Ask anyone on the street: how do you multiple by ten? They answer: put a zero on the end. That's string manipulation, not arithmetic. People automatically switch from numbers to strings and back to numbers without thinking about it. People do not think in types.

Comment: Re:No Crossing (Score 1) 263

by shawnhcorey (#45263881) Attached to: How an Astronaut Falling Into a Black Hole Would Die Part 2
Consider: g = -GM / ( r^2 - e^2 ) where g is the acceleration, G is the gravity constant, M is the mass of the black hole, r is the distance from the black hole's center, e is the radius of the event horizon. From Wikipedia: "Attempting to make an object near the horizon remain stationary with respect to an observer requires applying a force whose magnitude increases unbounded (becoming infinite) the closer it gets." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Event_horizon#Interacting_with_an_event_horizon

Old programmers never die, they just become managers.

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