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Comment Re:Most stock markets ... (Score 1, Informative) 364 364

Put all these pieces together, and here's what we have: a rise in Chinese share prices in the last year that seemed to be driven more by investor psychology than by anything fundamental

Lately this seems to be how stock markets work.

It has nothing to do with actual value, just the psychotic glee of investors and speculators who envision doubling their money every six months.

The stock market has become separated from reality, with the people running the giant pyramid scheme feeling entitled to skim off the top with high-frequency trading.

In the long term, the assumptions used in the stock market seem to be irrational, unsustainable, and pretty much impossible. And corporations are often overvalued based on valuations which is more than the company will ever earn in the next few centuries.

Stock markets are going to fuck up our economies more than they seem to be helping. Because they stopped having anything to do with fundamentals and sane valuations a VERY long time ago.

The stock market is a reflection of mass delusion and wishful thinking.

Sorry, that's false. The stock market (rather accurately) reflects the earnings and intrinsic values of the underlying companies (at least in the US). Values are a little bit frothy right now as we're 6 years into a bull market, but well within historical norms. The Shiller price:earnings ratio is around 25 right now, with the historical average being around 16-18 depending on your timescale.

http://www.multpl.com/shiller-pe/

Sure, there are plenty of people making money off the stock market and investors do dumb things, but the fundamentals of the stock market haven't changed.

Networking

The Standards Wars and the Sausage Factory 234 234

Esther Schindler writes "We all know how important tech standards are. But the making of them is sometimes a particularly ugly process. Years, millions of dollars, and endless arguments are spent arguing about standards. The reason for our fights aren't any different from those that drove Edison and Westinghouse: It's all about who benefits – and profits – from a standard. As just one example, Steven Vaughan-Nichols details the steps it took to approve a networking standard that everyone, everyone knew was needed: 'Take, for example, the long hard road for the now-universal IEEE 802.11n Wi-Fi standard. There was nothing new about the multiple-in, multiple-out (MIMO) and channel-bonding techniques when companies start moving from 802.11g to 802.11n in 2003. Yet it wasn't until 2009 that the standard became official.'"
Space

New Type of Star Can Emerge From Inside Black Holes, Say Cosmologists 193 193

KentuckyFC writes "Black holes form when a large star runs out of fuel and collapses under its own weight. Since there is no known force that can stop this collapse, astrophysicists have always assumed that it forms a singularity, a region of space that is infinitely dense. Now cosmologists think quantum gravity might prevent this complete collapse after all. They say that the same force that stops an electron spiraling into a nucleus might also cause the collapsing star to 'bounce' at scales of around 10^-14cm. They're calling this new state a 'Planck star' and say its lifetime would match that of the black hole itself as it evaporates. That raises the possibility that the shrinking event horizon would eventually meet the expanding Planck star, which emerges with a sudden blast of gamma rays. That radiation would allow any information trapped in the black hole to escape, solving the infamous information paradox. If they're right, these gamma rays may already have been detected by space-based telescopes meaning that the evidence is already there for any enterprising astronomer to tease apart."
Businesses

Is Intel Selling Bay Trail Chips Below Cost? 156 156

edxwelch writes "An analyst at Bernstein Research has found that Intel is selling their tablet Bay Trail chips to OEMs below cost, concluding that after end rebates, Intel's tablet revenues are likely to be "close to zero," while profits will be negative. Intel has responded that the 'special costs' Intel is incurring are not pushing down gross margin. Intel needs to offer the subsidies to OEMs building $199-$299 devices to bring the bill of materials down and make them competive with cheaper chips from the likes of MediaTek and Rockchip."
Bitcoin

The Bitcoin Death Star: KnC Plans 10 Megawatt Data Center In Sweden 250 250

1sockchuck writes "Bitcoin hardware vendor KnC Miner has begun construction on a a 10 megawatt data center in Sweden that it will fill with high-powered computers mining for cryptocurrency. KnC has emerged as a leading vendor in the volatile market for ASIC mining rigs, focusing on underpromising and overdelivering. One goal of its move into cloud mining is to cushion any fallout from delivery delays on new hardware, which have been a sore point for miners in the fast-moving Bitcoin market. "Over the next few months we are bringing online enough hashing power to make sure that any delay in the Neptune timeline will be compensated with a completely free hosted hashing packages to all fully paid customers," KnC says in its newsletter."
Sony

Sony Selling Off VAIO Computer Business 204 204

Kensai7 writes "Confirming reports from earlier in the week, Sony has announced plans to sell off its VAIO computer division to a Japanese investment fund. Japan Industrial Partners (JIP) will take control of the operation for an undisclosed fee, and Sony will 'cease planning, design and development of PC products.' For a variety of reasons 'including the drastic changes in the global PC industry,' Sony says 'the optimal solution is to concentrate its mobile product lineup on smartphones and tablets and to transfer its PC business to a new company.'" I have some nostalgia for the tiny old VAIO laptops; I wish more companies incorporated the swiveling camera that they came with.

Submission + - Slashdot BETA Discussion-> 60 60

mugnyte writes: With Slashdot's recent restyled "BETA" slowly rolled to most users, there's been a lot of griping about the changes. This is nothing new, as past style changes have had similar effects. However, this pass there are significant usability changes: A narrower read pane, limited moderation filtering, and several color/size/font adjustments. BETA implies not yet complete, so taking that cue — please list your specific, detailed opinoins, one per comment, and let's use the best part of slashdot (the moderation system) to raise the attention to these. Change can be jarring, but let's focus on the true usability differences with the new style.
Link to Original Source

Comment Beta blows (Score 4, Insightful) 127 127

So I guess I still haven't been forced over to the dark side yet, but I went to try it out again to just see if it still sucks as bad as last time. And yup, it does. Completely unreadable, absurd amount of scrolling, ridiculous forced spacing, asinine column widths. Seriously, what's it going to take to make this die?
NASA

NASA Pondering Two Public Contests To Build Small Space Exploration Satellites 127 127

coondoggie writes "NASA today said it was looking into developing two new Centennial Challenge competitions that would let the public design, build and deliver small satellites known as Cubesats capable of operations and experiments near the moon and beyond. The first challenge will focus on finding innovative ways to allow deep space communications with small spacecraft, while the second focuses on primary propulsion for small spacecraft."
Programming

HTML5 App For Panasonic TVs Rejected - JQuery Is a "Hack" 573 573

An anonymous reader writes "I have been working on an HTML5 app for Panasonic VIERA TVs, specifically a client for the Plex Media Server. After paying $129 for the developer program, version 1.0 was submitted for inclusion in their VIERA Connect marketplace several weeks ago. After a few requested tweaks, they inquired about how the client communicated with the Plex Server. As many/most web developers do, I used jQuery and its $.ajax call (which is just a wrapper for XMLHttpRequest()). They insisted this was not standard Javascript, and after several communications with them, they replied back with "A workaround like this is considered a hack.". I'm stunned that anyone familiar with HTML would consider jQuery a hack. I've been patient in attempting to explain how jQuery works, but I am getting nowhere. Any thoughts on how I can better explain jQuery to an app reviewer? Yes, I know I can write my app without any Javascript library, but I am really hoping avoid that."
Biotech

Designer Seeds Thought To Be Latest Target By Chinese 164 164

An anonymous reader writes "Economic espionage is nothing new but one of the biggest areas being targeted now is agriculture. Here's a story about a FBI investigation to track down theft of seeds from research farms. 'The case of the missing corn seeds first broke in May 2011 when a manager at a DuPont research farm in east-central Iowa noticed a man on his knees, digging up the field. When confronted, the man, Mo Hailong, who was with his colleague Wang Lei, appeared flushed. Mr. Mo told the manager that he worked for the University of Iowa and was traveling to a conference nearby. When the manager paused to answered his cellphone, the two men sped off in a car, racing through a ditch to get away, federal authorities said.'"
Software

Ask Slashdot: Dealing With the Business Software Alliance? 519 519

Kagetsuki writes "We've just gotten a letter from an attorney representing the Business Software Alliance stating someone (we're certain it's a disgruntled former employee) submitted information we are using illegally copied software. The thing is... we're not using illegally copied software. We have licenses for all the commercial software we are using. Still, according to articles on the BSA, that's irrelevant and they'll end up suing us anyway. So we now need a lawyer to deal with their claims and we don't have the money — this will surely be the end of the company into which I've sunk all my savings and three years of my life. Has anybody dealt with the Business Software Alliance before? What action should I take? Is there any sort of financial recourse, or at least a way cover our legal fees?"

Comment Re:Cool beans. (Score 2) 111 111

Wrong.

Any procedure like this, especially in sensitive areas like the brain and spine, are done with 3D MRI topography guidance ("Look ma, no glasses!"). Look up STEALTH MRI if you're interested. You basically take high res MRIs with multiple markers placed on the surface of the subjects' skin for reference, then the computer does some fancy math and says "Put needle here, go this deep, then stop".

Quit the radiation fear mongering. And yes, IAAMD.

All syllogisms have three parts, therefore this is not a syllogism.

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