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+ - Best cross-platform (or only Linux) audio software? 1

Submitted by blogologue
blogologue (681423) writes "I have played the guitar for some years now, and these days I think it's good therapy to be creative with music learning the piano and singing as well. So far I've been using Audacity as the tool to compose improvisations and demos, I haven't done much audio work before but it is already becoming too limited for my needs. Being a Linux-fanboi since the middle nineties I'm now looking for a good audio processing/editing/enhancing setup that can run on different platforms, the most important being Linux (yes, voting for Linux with my dollar). Are there any suggestions for Open Source or proprietary audio editing software that runs Linux?"

+ - A Tour of GitHub HQ

Submitted by sharksfan98
sharksfan98 (2635753) writes "Yesterday, I recieved the honor to go to GitHub headquarters and meet Chris Wanstrath, Cofounder of GitHub. I had sent him an email two weeks ago, explaining my experience with using the site on my projects (and I'm 14) and a few questions about how he got started and the business model behind GitHub. He replied recently, asking me to come to HQ, get a personal tour of HQ, and get my questions answered. We agree to meet for an hour in the morning on Thursday, in which I come to see the quite peculiar office. Entering the office on Brannan Street, a row of hard hats lay, each adorned with an Octocat sticker. Wanstrath later explains that GitHub's first and fourth floor in their new office are still under construction, which I was not able to visit. We walk into an elevator described by the 27 year old Cofounder as "the slowest elevator in the world", taking us to the quite busy second floor. We were greeted by a Black Labrador retriever and a few other dogs, to find that GitHubbers bring their four-legged friends to work and have them wonder and play while their owners code. The desks were arranged around in rows, each with an Apple Thunderbolt and a black swivel chair. Chris greeted us from behind, sporiting a Black GitHub jacket, Skinny Jeans and Tennis Shoes. He first shows us two flatscreen TVs mounted to a nearby wall, one displaying GitHub's server status and the other showing the staff's whereabouts on snapchat, reacurring all across the office. As we moved across the office, we noticed that each little room had a different theme and humorous title, from small little "Skype Rooms" for calls and conferences and Server Rooms titled "Racks and Bits". Each conference room was themed, including a Wild West-themed conference room, equipped with a Saloon Piano, Playing Cards and Animal Heads mounted to the wall; the "Situation Room", a black oval desk with two Rotary Phones and a sensitive part of the wall that pushes into a secret executive room, which we later visit. Workers are able to work wherever they please, including their desks that can be adjusted so you can code sitting down or standing up, in small little rooms equipped with various paintings of the Octocat (my personal favorite being the Andy Warhol one), posh chairs and posh wallpaper; and "Coder Caves", small deconstructed boxes containing tons of pillows and lighting. They had tons of amenities, including a bar with their own whiskey labeled "Slow Merge" and a wooden keg with an inscribed octocat, a Zen Room with a Taichi mat and small pillows for contemplating with a Yoga Room next door, and a library with "books bought by the stack" according to Wanstrath. "We still discover gems every day". We advance on to the next floor, where we find the OctoShop, where all Merch is sold and distributed for GitHub. He offers me a black GitHub zip hoodie, in which I ditch my black cardigan and throw on his generous gift. We enter the Animation and Sound Studios, where two men are working on laptops, constructing everything from employee training videos, announcements, and humorous GIFs that are posted on their blog. We run into another bar, equipped with a fridge full of every soda and tea imaginable. We walk back to the secret room within the situation room, where I discuss the life and times of Chris and GitHub.
          We sit down inside the room, with a full library, a painting of the Octocat at Napoleon Bonaparte (painted by one of the main developers of Git), a smoking jacket alongside a pipe and even a chess board ("I've always wanted to play a chess game while having a meeting with somebody" Chris admits. "Not even mentioning the game while talking, making moves and hitting the timer without even talking about our moves."). Chris and I are pictured admiring the room in the following picture at http://i.imgur.com/ZN5jH9J.jpg. He starts to talk about how in High School how he got into programming, designing simple games with graphics in OpenGL and later discovering an interest in web design, making blogs and simple sites with friends. He pursued to get a Degree in English, but dropped out after a year or two in pursuit of a job designing an interface for a Trucking Company. He later left and went back to College to pursue Computer Science, but not just to continue his needed studies, but because of the bad ethics of the Trucking Company. "I really didn't like it there because they only focused on money, not actually on focusing on making a good product". He moved to San Francisco to pursue his own startup, a message board intended for Families. He admitted to me that is wasn't the greatest idea, but while working on this statup, he met Tom Preston-Werner, who started working on the side-project GitHub. Intended to facilitate code for Wanstrath's side project and Preston-Werner's project Gravatar (recently acquired by Wordpress), being fully released after three months of beta in 2008. It was shipped with the basic system, plus commit comments and a graph. We talked more and more about how it expanded, the server's system for avoiding troubles during downtime and the in-office tinkering with the Raspberry Pi and Arduino; but Chris ended on the note to "always pursue in making a good product, not to focus on the money"."

+ - Ask Slashdot: What's Your Favorite Embedded System?

Submitted by sharksfan98
sharksfan98 (2635753) writes "I'm doing an Algebra project involving a poll, and I wanted to collect your guy's opinion for my poll.

Q: What's your favorite Embedded System?

A:
      A) Raspberry Pi
      B) Arduino
      C) FPGA
      D) Other

Please give your input below! Please give me data!"
Censorship

+ - Chinese Government blocks GitHub via DNS->

Submitted by
sharksfan98
sharksfan98 writes "Reports are coming in that the social coding site GitHub has been blocked in China. While the service has seen blocks in the country before, this appears to be a much broader denial of service, affecting most, if not all users in the world’s most populous country online and offline.

We first heard about the new censorship from Chinese web monitoring site GreatFire (and our own Josh Ong confirmed he couldn’t access the site as well):

GitHub completely blocked in China now, including HTTPS en.greatfire.org/https/github.c. Bad news for Chinese software developers

According to the site’s monitoring page for GitHub, there have been contradictory results for months, but most in the last 24 hours there have been findings of a “Complete blocking detected.” Just last week, there were reports of “No censorship detected.”

Users on Hacker News have also noticed, with a submission pointing to ViewDNS.info. This is the same test as BlockedInChina and GreatFirewallOfChina, and either way the result isn’t good:

The site then displays it being blocked in Beijing, Shenzen, Inner Mongolia, Heilongjiang Province, and Yunnan Province.

Hacker News user gbraad from Beijing gives a bit more context:

Did a traceroute and this reveals an expected result. It is really the DNS which returns a wrong value ’59.24.3.173 instead of the expected ’207.97.227.239, so it looks like a dns poisoning attempt or some other dns issue. Editing your /etc/hosts file or using opendns can help in this case.

So with OpenDNS it loads still some packetloss, but this is expected. In the worst case, use a VPN. Although, this means it will trouble Chinese participation and contributions to projects even more.

There are already many theories as to why it has been blocked: for example, ccp0202 believes it’s related to an automated train ticket polling plugin while csmattryder thinks it’s because of the release of mongol, a tool that detects routers acting in the Great Firewall. Chances are we’ll never know the exact reason.

This is quite unfortunate as GitHub censorship means Chinese developers will have to play around with workarounds or find an alternative service when they want to work with their peers around the world. There might be a chance that this is a temporary block, however, as with the Chinese government you just never know.

We have contacted GitHub about this issue. We will update this article if we hear back.

See also – Github passes 3m registered users, adds 1.3m sign-ups since raising $100m in July"

Link to Original Source

Comment: I Beg to Differ... (Score 1) 453

by sharksfan98 (#42499471) Attached to: Why JavaScript Is the New Perl
I do not agree with this article because Perl and JavaScript are two whole different languages. I use Perl everyday to write simple scripts from everything to running Regular Expressions (while I'm not using Python). I've faintly used JavaScript when writing web applications in node.js, but I've never really needed it for anything else. Perl can do web and GUI development (in Perl/Tk and CGI), but it does way more. JavaScript only does web development, while Perl does way more. I would agree with a statement more like "Python is the new Perl", but nothing else seems to come close to Perl.
Ubuntu

+ - Ubuntu for Phones to be discussed at CES 2013->

Submitted by sharksfan98
sharksfan98 (2635753) writes "Today on Canonical's webpage, they revealed their new upcoming Ubuntu phone, which will be presented at CES, which is held January 8-11. They describe their new smartphone as "Room for your Content, Mobile Industry ready, and Everything developers need." Canonical states, "Your phone is more immersive, the screen is less cluttered, and you flow naturally from app to app with edge magic. The phone becomes a full PC and thin client when docked. Ubuntu delivers a magical phone that is faster to run, faster to use and fits perfectly into the Ubuntu family. With all-native core apps and no Java overhead, Ubuntu runs well on entry-level smartphones – yet it uses the same drivers as Android. So now it’s easy to bring a better experience to customers all over the world. Create gorgeous native apps or lightweight HTML5 apps easily with our SDK. Repurpose web apps fast, so they look and work like their native cousins. With one OS for all form factors, one app can have interfaces for phone and desktop – in just one upload to one store." You can learn more about their new phone at http://www.ubuntu.com/devices/phone"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Finally, You Dingy Valve! (Score 1) 2

by sharksfan98 (#41564217) Attached to: Steam gets first game on Linux
Let me be the first to say that this is amazing. When I removed Windows on my machine and brought forth Ubuntu, the program I missed most was Steam, especially those days where I would play TF2 for hours. Now, I can do this again, without going back to a crummy operating system like Windows 7. I believe they've had Left 4 Dead 2 Released as well out for Linux for a while, but let's hope the develop Half-Life 3 for Linux when it comes out.
Debian

+ - Steam for Linux to Arrive 'In a Few Days'->

Submitted by
sharksfan98
sharksfan98 writes "Steam’s arrival on Linux isn’t a secret – and even when it was it was a poorly kept one.

The company have been internally testing the Linux client for a while, and recently announced that an ‘external’ beta Linux users would be coming out ‘sometime in October’. No specific date was given.

But, today, a request from Canonical’s Bryce H. to Ubuntu developers has offered up a more definite time-frame – one that seems to be happening this week

He wrote in his request:

“Could an archive or SRU admin accept nvidia-common and jockey from the upload queue?

  These are needed for the Valve Steam release that happens in a few days.”

The bad-ish news is that only 1000 people will have access to the external beta to begin with. So as close as its release is it won’t be landing in the laps of everyone quite yet.

But it’s still exciting, no?"

Link to Original Source

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