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Comment Re:So... (Score 1) 90

LOL riiiight, I'm sure they are just lining up when the reviews all say the same thing which is Steam machines are completely pointless as they give you NONE of the benefits of a console and NONE of the benefits of a Windows gaming PC. You are paying MORE money for WORSE hardware and without the entire point of consoles, the ease of use and exclusive titles. I can find review after review and they all say the same things, glitchy controller, bad UI, buggy as a pile of shit in August, its a completely pointless product that will only appeal to the Linux faithful...who won't want to have a fucking thing to do with Steam DRM ROFL!

So sorry to burst your bubble but feel free to bookmark this post and come back in 24 months and see its truth, SteamOS will do about as much to spur Linux adoption as Ubuntu has, that is jack and squat. I mean for Pete's sake you no longer even have the "free as in beer" selling point as anybody can download the Windows 10 Insider release and use it for free.

Comment Re:GG is owned by Sony (Score 1) 186

Snowed himself has called that idea a "suicide switch". It would be idiotic. It means that anyone who wants those documents merely has to kill him, and boom, instant access to the whole deal.

Which also gives the US incentive to make sure that nobody hurts a hair on his head.

Either way, I don't think Snowden's even been in control of those archives for years. There's a reason he turned them over to journalists and kept them somewhere that's even out of his own reach.

Comment Re:GG is owned by Sony (Score 3, Interesting) 186

By the way, where are the leaks? Cryptome has been keeping track, and on any scale, he hasn't "leaked" more than 1% of what snowden gave him.

And that's probably why Glenn Greenwald hasn't suffered a "fatal accident". Because he, along with Snowden, Poitras and others, have probably created a "dead man's switch" that releases everything if any of them die in suspicious circumstances.

That's what I'd do, anyway.

Comment Re:So... (Score 1) 90

Now that the Steam Box is on the market, there is a growing demand for high-end gaming graphics on Linux. That sound you hear is nVidia laughing all the way to the bank.

They've already been there counting and laughing ever since the GTX 970/980 launched. They fell over laughing when they learned that the Fury would be a $500+ card only. Steam boxes would just be the cherry on top.

Comment Re:he should know better (Score 2) 241

If you made some kind of public statement and your employer/landlord/bank called you up and said it's not compatible with being an employee/tenant/customer of ours anymore I think most people would call it a free speech issue. Granted, we're not really being consistent because half the time we want to protect dissenting opinions from the wrath of the majority and the other half we want obnoxious and offensive speech to have consequences. Like when Brendan Eich was forced to step down as CEO of Mozilla, was that right or wrong? Some think it was right, that the LGBT community had a right to cause a shit storm. Others think they blatantly silenced an opposing voice by harassing his employer. But the government wasn't involved, so there was no free speech issue right?

Comment I talked to the manager... (Score 1) 442

Jerry: Yeah, but that TruCoat--
Customer: I sat right here and said I didn't want no TruCoat!
Jerry: Yeah, but I'm sayin', that TruCoat, you don't get it and you get oxidization problems. It'll cost you a heck of lot more'n five hundred--
Customer: You're sittin' here, you're talkin' in circles! You're talkin' like we didn't go over this already!
Jerry: Yeah, but this TruCoat--
Customer: We had us a deal here for nine-teen-five. You sat there and darned if you didn't tell me you'd get this car, these options, without the sealant, for nine-teen-five!
Jerry: All right, I'm not sayin' I didn't--
Customer: You called me twenty minutes ago and said you had it! Ready to make delivery, ya says! Come on down and get it! And here ya are and you're wastin' my time and you're wastin' my wife's time and I'm payin' nineteen-five for this vehicle here!
Jerry: All right. I'll talk to my boss. See, they install that TruCoat at the factory, there's nothin' we can do, but I'll talk to my boss.

Comment Re:Easy solution (Score 4, Insightful) 442

California. As well as not banning direct sales by auto manufacturers, it provides more protections for employees (banning non-compete contract terms), limits on how short yellow lights can be at signals, and the state government is running a surplus.

That's what good, conservative governance will do for you.

Oh wait.

Comment Re:This would level the playing ground (Score 1) 361

The depreciation is $500,000 and only on assets above $2 million - and must be for business purposes.

That's only half. The owner can also expense $500,000 in the first year.

Not everyone was happy on January 2 when President Obama signed into law the American Taxpayer Relief Act, notably those whose first 2013 paychecks were smaller than the ones they’d received in 2012.

But the law gave Thoroughbred horse owners a reason to raise a glass in a belated New Year’s toast, as it enacted retroactively favorable provisions that had expired at the end of 2011.

“What was supposed to happen in 2013,” said Joe Bacigalupo, director of member development for the National Thoroughbred Racing Association, “was that the bonus depreciation for 2012, which was set at a 50% schedule, would disappear entirely. The passage of the American Taxpayer Relief Act extended it for 2013.

“There’s a significant improvement between what was expected to happen and what actually happened.”

According to an NTRA release, the bonus depreciation on purchases of race horses was reinstated at 50%, which was the 2012 rate. The expense allowance was increased to $500,000 for this year and retroactively increased from $125,000 to $500,000 for horses purchased in 2012.

Said Joel Turner, a member of Frost Brown Todd attorneys in Louisville, Kentucky, and a specialist in equine legal services, “These incentives are real.”

While conceding that the announcement of the retroactive provisions wasn’t great for tax planning, he said their beneficiaries will be “rewarded for legitimate reasons” and that the aggregate of benefits will mean that in some cases, 80% of the purchase price of a horse can be deducted in the first year.

“The ability to expense the first $500,000 and take depreciation on the next $500,000 means that essentially you’re almost getting a 100% write-off in the first year,” he explained.

Estimating the value of all aspects of the Thoroughbred racing industry to be worth about $4 billion dollars to his home state of Kentucky, Turner approved of the renewal of the provisions.

“Buying horses and writing them off was included in the law because of the ripple effect to the economy,” he said. “This encourages investment in assets.”

The trouble with a lot of self-made men is that they worship their creator.