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Comment: China angle (Score 1) 140

by shadows83 (#33107140) Attached to: RIM's Encryption 'Too Secure' For Indian Government's Taste
Indian government have been trying to find a solution for this for last 2 years with BB. Now there is urgency as BB has set up infra in China and all Indian calls will be routed via this infra. I am all for privacy but I will prefer Indian govt snooping on my data rather than china. And, as others have said, there is a legitimate requirement for Indian Govt to monitor all communications.

+ - Apple shut out Admob->

Submitted by shadows83
shadows83 (1644707) writes "Apple has drawn a line in the developer sandbox that some larger advertising companies, like Google's AdMob, may not be too happy with. In a revision of the iOS developer terms, Apple has stated that application creators may pass on certain non-device data with Apple's explicit permission, but only to independent advertising companies not owned by or affiliated with mobile platform developers and distributors (read: Google, with its Android platform)."
Link to Original Source
Businesses

+ - Business discovers H.264 for HD videoconferencing->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "It looks as though H.264 has found itself another champion, this time in the world of business boardrooms. Polycom is to launch a telepresence product that it claims offers 1080p high-definition (HD) video while using half the bandwidth of comparable systems. The Polycom Open Telepresence Experience 300 (OTX 300) runs on the H.264 video compression standard which Polycom is trying to convince IT managers will help provide a "true-to-life" collaboration service without the need for network upgrades. For those familiar with Skype video chat, telepresence systems like these are a very different beast — the Polcyom OTX 300 includes motorized screens which rise out of the desk, and can handle up to 28 participants."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:You know what's really sad? (Score 1) 902

by Remus Shepherd (#31611388) Attached to: Will Your Answers To the Census Stay Private?

I think we need to expand the word 'privacy'. It means many things.

When I'm at home with the blinds drawn, I expect that nobody will know what I am doing there. That kind of privacy is important to me -- and guess what, I still have it. The government has made very few inroads on that kind of privacy.

But as for my personal information? Take it. As long as nothing illegal is done with it (identity theft is a different concern), then I don't care. The labels that the government put on my race, sexual orientation, and political affiliation don't mean anything to me, and my address is already a public record. If I allow *anyone* to know those things, then I don't mind the government knowing them also.

I guess I feel as if I still have the ability to determine which information about myself I want to release. And that's all I ask. Now, if it gets to the point that they demand to know information I do not want to give -- such as a DNA sample -- then we have a problem. But it hasn't reached that point yet. The census questions were so generic, and it was clear that I could choose not to answer many of them (such as race), that I just didn't feel threatened by it at all.

Comment: Privacy Act of 1974 (Score 4, Informative) 902

by BlueBoxSW.com (#31611320) Attached to: Will Your Answers To the Census Stay Private?

Yeah, we did a lot of crazy things in the 40's. Misuse of census data, treatment of japanese americans, tuskegee airmen.

What the @ssholes who are spouting this propaganda forget is there ARE privacy laws in place to prevent misuse of data.

It IS illegal to do now in ways it WASN'T then.

Beware of Programmers who carry screwdrivers. -- Leonard Brandwein

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