Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Science

LHC Shut Down By Transformer Malfunction 293

Posted by timothy
from the it's-only-broken-if-you-look dept.
Ortega-Starfire writes "A 30-ton transformer in the Large Hadron Collider malfunctioned, requiring complete replacement on the day the LHC came online. No one at CERN reported any problems, and they only released this data once the Associated Press sent people to investigate rumors of problems. I guess it's hard to just sweep a 30-ton transformer breaking under the rug."
Censorship

Mark Cuban Calls on ISPs to Block P2P 463

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the point-and-laugh dept.
boaz112358 writes "Mark Cuban, Dallas Mavericks owner, HDNet CEO, and noted gadfly is publishing on his blog that Comcast and other ISPs should block all P2P traffic, because as he says, "As a consumer, I want my internet experience to be as fast as possible. The last thing I want slowing my internet service down are P2P freeloaders." He complains that commercial content distributors instead of paying for their own bandwidth, are leeching off consumers who are paying for the bandwidth. As an alternative distribution method (at least for audio and video), he suggests Google video."
Privacy

US Consumers Clueless About Online Tracking 228

Posted by kdawson
from the just-pretend-nobody's-watching dept.
Arashtamere writes "A study on consumer perceptions about online privacy, undertaken by the Samuelson Clinic at the University of California and the Annenberg Public Policy Center, found that the average American consumer is largely unaware that every move they make online can be, and often is, tracked by online marketers and advertising networks. Those surveyed showed little knowledge on the extent to which online tracking is happening or how the information obtained can be used. More than half of those surveyed — about 55 percent — falsely assumed that a company's privacy polices prohibited it from sharing their addresses and purchases with affiliated companies. Nearly four out of 10 online shoppers falsely believed that a company's privacy policy prohibits it from using information to analyze an individuals' activities online. And a similar number assumed that an online privacy policy meant that a company they're doing business with wouldn't collect data on their online activities and combine it with other information to create a behavioral profile."
Software

+ - Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac (Beta) Leaked

Submitted by jan_mate
jan_mate (939823) writes "Well that didn't take long. Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac (Beta) leaked to torrent trackers, few months before they were officially released. It comes in at around 465 MB (universal binary) and can be found pretty much everywhere. At the core, many improvements have been made to the user interface, features and usability in comparison with Microsoft Office 2004."
Censorship

+ - Cellphone answering machine DRM?->

Submitted by
iCantSpell
iCantSpell writes "When I configured my cellphone answering machine I had a song for a recording instead of my voice. Deciding to change my answering machine pickup, using free.napster.com (free streams yay) to record over the old mailbox message. I pressed 1 and listened to it, sounds fine and working. Few hours later some friends were telling me my answering machine was jacked up. I went back to the answering machine configuration and tried to listen to the current recording. Come to my surprise it sounds like garbage, literally, sounds of what I think are cans and lord knows what. Thinking no problem I'll just re-record it, it occured several times before I just gave up. The only difference from the old and the new answering machine recording is the old one was recorded from a mp3 file and the new one was via napster. Just makes no since to me. I was (still am) thinking some intrusive DRM. Any other explanations maybe?"
Link to Original Source
Programming

Do You Recommend Google Maps API or Microsoft Live Maps? 252

Posted by Zonk
from the two-options-many-permutations dept.
KSobby writes "The organization that I work for is going to be redoing our website in .Net/AJAX. On the site, our members will have profile pages listing where their organizations are located (our members are scattered throughout the world) as well as other pertinent information for the general public. It is a non-profit organization, so funds are tight. My question to you: If we include maps, which API do we go with: Google or Microsoft? We're in a Microsoft environment (we're non-profit and Microsoft basically gives us everything for free) but the ubiquity of Google may be enough to sway us. Has anyone used either extensively? Used them in conjunction with .Net?"
Patents

Vonage Hit With $69.5M Judgement 234

Posted by kdawson
from the hard-to-get-customers-after-that dept.
andy1307 writes "The Washington Post is reporting that Net telephone company Vonage Holdings Corp. was ordered in federal court Tuesday to pay Sprint Nextel $69.5 million in damages for infringing on six telecommunications patents owned by competitor Sprint Nextel Corp. In addition to the damages, jurors awarded Sprint Nextel a 5 percent royalty from Vonage on future revenues. It was the second verdict against Vonage this year. A jury in Virginia determined in March that Vonage had violated three Verizon patents in building its Internet phone system. The jury awarded Verizon $58 million in damages plus 5.5 percent royalties on future revenues. Greg Gorbatenko, a telecommunications and media analyst for Jackson Securities, said the decision 'feels like a death knell' for Vonage because future revenue will likely dry up, preventing the company from investing in better technology or improving customer service."
Space

Will China Beat the United States Back to the Moon? 482

Posted by Zonk
from the they'll-make-the-trip-from-the-earth-to-the-moon dept.
MarkWhittington writes "During an address on the space economy to coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the start of the space age, NASA Administrator Michael Griffin made the assertion that China would beat the United States back to the Moon. 'Americans will not like it, but they will just have to not like it. I think we will see, as we have seen with China's introductory manned space flights so far, we will see again that nations look up to other nations that appear to be at the top of the technical pyramid, and they want to do deals with those nations. It's one of the things that made us the world's greatest economic power. So I think we'll be reinstructed in that lesson in the coming years and I hope that Americans will take that instruction positively and react to it by investing in those things that are the leading edge of what's possible."'"
Communications

What Do You Want In iPhone 2.0? 436

Posted by Zonk
from the you-know-its-coming dept.
Ian Lamont writes "The predictions about the iPhone being a bust have so far been way off the mark, but that doesn't mean the device is perfect. Besides the dependence on the AT&T Edge network and the lack of an iPhone SDK, there are a boatload of UI, software and hardware issues that should be addressed in the next-generation iPhone. Some complaints include GPS functionality, allowing iPhones to be used as hard drives, adding RSS support, and turning auto-correct into auto-complete. What would you want to see in the next generation of iPhone?"
Microsoft

Microsoft Sued by a Beijing Student Over 'Privacy Violation' 157

Posted by Zonk
from the guy-thinks-highly-of-himself dept.
freakxx writes "Xinhua report that a Beijing University student has sued Microsoft for allegedly gathering personal information via Windows Genuine Advantage. He has demanded a compensation of 1,350 RMB (around US$ 180) and an open apology printed in a national newspaper. The student has accused Microsoft of using WGA to gather information about his computer and himself, rather than solely checking whether or not the installed Windows XP system was genuine. A Microsoft spokesman has declined to speak on this issue and said that the matter is under investigation."
Privacy

Rick Rubin Discloses Sony Rootkit Called Home 249

Posted by kdawson
from the curiouser-and-curiouser dept.
caffeinemessiah writes "Rick Rubin, the legendary music producer, recently signed on as co-head of Columbia Records, which is owned by Sony BMG. In a recent New York Times interview (on pg. 4 of the online version), he discloses, possibly accidentally: 'It was the highest debut of Neil [Diamond]'s career, off to a great start. But Columbia — it was some kind of corporate thing — had put spyware on the CD. That kept people from copying it, but it also somehow recorded information about whoever bought the record...' Seems like the rootkit might have been a little more than your vanilla invade-your-rights-DRM scheme."

Top Ten Things Overheard At The ANSI C Draft Committee Meetings: (10) Sorry, but that's too useful.

Working...