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Encryption

The Beginnings of Encrypted Computing In the Cloud 76

Posted by Soulskill
from the stormy-weather dept.
eldavojohn writes "A method of computing from a 2009 paper allows the computing of data without ever decrypting it. With cloud computing on the rise, this may be the holy grail of keeping private data private in the cloud. It's called Fully Homomorphic Encryption, and if you've got the computer science/mathematics chops you can read the thesis (PDF). After reworking it and simplifying it, researchers have moved it away from being true, fully homomorphic encryption, but it is now a little closer to being ready for cloud usage. The problem is that the more operations performed on your encrypted data, the more likely it has become 'dirty' or corrupted. To combat this, Gentry developed a way to periodically clean the data by making it self-correcting. The article notes that although this isn't prepared for use in reliable systems, it is a quick jump to implementation just one year after the paper was published — earlier encryption papers would take as much as half a decade until they were implemented at all."

Comment: Emulab (Score 1) 141

by serodores (#28665905) Attached to: Open Source Facing a Difficult Battle For Cloud Relevance
First, Emulab has been around longer than Amazon's or Google's cloud. It's a bit stricter than GPL, being AGPL, in which any users that contact the service have to be given sourc code (i.e., even the server), which makes it difficult to legally use by big businesses. Second, Amazon at least is pretty likely to be running Xen and other GPL software under the covers.
Data Storage

Ext4 Advances As Interim Step To Btrfs 510

Posted by kdawson
from the butter-is-better dept.
Heise.de's Kernel Log has a look at the ext4 filesystem as Linus Torvalds has integrated a large collection of patches for it into the kernel main branch. "This signals that with the next kernel version 2.6.28, the successor to ext3 will finally leave behind its 'hot' development phase." The article notes that ext4 developer Theodore Ts'o (tytso) is in favor of ultimately moving Linux to a modern, "next-generation" file system. His preferred choice is btrfs, and Heise notes an email Ts'o sent to the Linux Kernel Mailing List a week back positioning ext4 as a bridge to btrfs.

Pause for storage relocation.

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