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Comment: Re:It's 2014 (Score 1) 349

by semilemon (#47373093) Attached to: Bug In Fire TV Screensaver Tears Through 250 GB Data Cap
I'm in Saskatchewan, so I don't know the details of TekSavvy's coverage or data caps, but I would switch to them from your current provider anyway. Any company that offers to lower your bill/offer more service *after* you tell them your leaving doesn't deserve your business in the first place.

Comment: Vote With Your Wallet (Score 2) 202

by semilemon (#46814425) Attached to: Netflix Plans To Raise Prices By "$1 or $2 a Month"

I don't understand why everyone gets so upset when Netflix talks about raising its prices by a couple of dollars per month. I've been a subscriber for several years, and even with the limited selection available in Canada, the lack of advertising and unlimited on demand nature makes it worth way more than the equivalent cost of a few days of cable/satellite.

Sometimes you have to vote with your wallet, even if that means overpaying a little bit for a product/service that you see the potential in and want to succeed. The content producers will follow the money (eventually). If you're not willing to pay an additional $24 per year, then how badly do you really want to see more content on Netflix?

Comment: Re:Gee, so only a year of screaming (Score 1) 387

I agree. The main complaint I seem to hear is that it takes up the entire screen. I don't find it that big of a deal, but if you do, just use Win+S. Then you get a bar that only takes up a portion of the desktop and allows you to search for whatever you are looking for, just like the old start menu.

Comment: Re:But not to give them a chance to correct it fir (Score 1) 404

While I agree with you insofar as relying too heavily on "nobody knows this attack vector exists so its as good as patched" provides a false sense of security, I don't think saying it is "no security at all" is any more accurate. For example, a lot of people keep a spare key for their vehicle hidden somewhere using a magnetic key holder in case they accidentally lock themselves out. While this is in fact an exploitable vulnerability, hiding a key somewhere on the car is still more secure than leaving a spare key inside the door lock in case you lock yourself out.

+ - Canada Revenue Agency To Tax BitCoin Transactions->

Submitted by semilemon
semilemon (1024757) writes "The Canada Revenue Agency has started paying attention to BitCoin transactions, as it says users will have to pay tax on all transactions using the currency. From the article, "The CRA told the CBC there are two separate tax rules that apply to the electronic currency, depending on whether they are used as money to buy things or if they were merely bought and sold for speculative purposes. "Barter transaction rules apply where BitCoins are used to purchase goods or services," Canada Revenue Agency spokesman Philippe Brideau said in an email. In this situation, that means whatever you've received in exchange for your $1 worth of vegetables must be documented as a taxable gain of at least $1 somewhere. When it comes to trading BitCoins for profit, the tax man says there are tax implications there, too. "When BitCoins are bought or sold like a commodity, any resulting gains or losses could be income or capital for the taxpayer depending on the specific facts," ruled the CRA."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Please tell me it wont be an accurate replica.. (Score 1) 292

by semilemon (#43035063) Attached to: Plans Unveiled For Full Scale Replica of the Titanic
I agree, I would be much more interested in this project if it was a stationary, exact replica on land that operated as a museum. Of course, it would not have to be totally complete (ie. only a few completed staterooms, with the rest of them just being closed doors). This would allow you to tour all parts of the ship (the bridge, the engine rooms, the Turkish baths, etc.) just as if you were on the real Titanic.

Comment: Agree 100% With The End of the Summary (Score 1) 295

by semilemon (#42945549) Attached to: Windows 7 Still Being Sold On Up To 93% of British PCs

I agree 100% with the end of the summary.

I've been using Windows 8 for about a month now, and as time goes on I'm finding myself using the new "Modern UI" for more and more of my day-to-day browsing, music, etc. However, even as somebody who is very computer literate, it took about an hour to get accustomed to the dual-UI setup and figure out the most common mouse/touchpad gestures.

While for me that hour wasn't a big deal, as I was expecting to spend some time learning the new interface, for the average user I can see the process being very frustrating. While a quick Google search yields hundreds of sites with keyboard shortcuts, hints, and video tutorials of how the new interface works, many "average" computer users probably won't even think to search for these tutorials like I did.

Honestly, I think most users will like the new UI, once they invest the time to learn it. And even if you do hate it, just uninstall/unpin all of the modern apps from the start screen, pin your most-used desktop apps to the start screen, and you'll almost never see "Modern UI" except when using the start screen. The real problem is that Microsoft's "introduction" to its complete rethink of how you interact with your computer is an animation showing you to move your mouse to the top right-hand corner of the screen to bring up the Charms bar. If they gave the option to "Click here for a tour of the new Windows interface", I think the average computer user would find things a lot less frustrating and would be more welcoming of the new Windows user interface.

Comment: Why So Many Problems? (Score 3, Interesting) 378

by semilemon (#39949809) Attached to: Overheated Voting Machine Cast Its Own Votes
I'm not particularly knowledgeable on the subject, so I'm hoping someone here can provide some insight. Why do electronic voting systems seems to have so many problems? Yes, they obviously need to be designed for 100% accuracy, but computers and electronic equipment take care of so many other, more complicated operations like flying aircraft and recording financial transactions, all of which should be much more complex but require the same level of accuracy and precision as counting votes. Are voting machines really that bad, are news reports skewing my opinion of them, or am I just unaware of how many problems a paper ballot system has?
Facebook

+ - Facebook reveals what data it collects on users->

Submitted by bobwrit
bobwrit (1232148) writes "Today, Facebook announced that they will provide its users with a download of all of the data it collects on them. In this data, it includes: chat logs, photos, friends. friend's emails, wit all posts, IP Addresses you have used, the previous names you have used, friend requests you have made, and more will be added soon. For the friend's emails, they only show users the emails that their friends have shared with them(so, if their email is listed as only viewable to them, or group you're not in, you can't see it). They also stated that this expanded archive will slowly roll out to all of the sites 845 million users."
Link to Original Source

Comment: The Problem With DRM (Score 1) 213

by semilemon (#38246516) Attached to: Napster Being Shut Down
From the Napster.ca FAQ regarding the shut-down:

Also, we strongly suggest that you back up all of your previously purchased and downloaded tracks because we will not be able to provide any customer support relating to them, including any further backup copies, after December 16, 2011. These downloads are DRM-encoded WMA files and can be backed up by burning them to audio CDs. Doing this will allow you access to your music on any CD player and generally have a maintenance free permanent copy. If you do not back up your purchased Napster music downloads by burning them to CD and you later change or reinstall your computer's operating system, have a system failure or experience DRM corruption, then the downloads will stop playing and you will permanently lose access to them.

Glad that DRM-free music downloads have become much more commonplace over the past few years. If I wanted to have CD-ROM backups of my music laying around, I would have went to the store and bought the CD in the first place.

Comment: Re:Just a matter of time... (Score 1) 348

by semilemon (#38233452) Attached to: MIT Algorithm Predicts Red Light Runners
Yes! In a city near where I live, there are timers on the crosswalk signs that let pedestrians know how long they have to get across the street. Everybody I know has commented on how much easier this makes driving through intersections, because when the timer reaches zero, the light changes from green to yellow. True, there will always be idiots who will still try the make the light, but that's where red light cameras and ticketing come in. At least the rest of us won't be left slamming on the brakes when the light suddenly goes to yellow for a half second before turning red.

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