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Comment: Re:systemd == Windows? (Score 1) 402

by seepho (#48825311) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Migrating a Router From Linux To *BSD?
A router is *totally* a system, though. But it just seems like we're just arguing semantics. I consider a philosophy to be a set of guidelines that exist for reasons beyond the scope of the system you're building. If you can't do something that makes sense for your system for reasons that exist beyond your system and the process of building/maintaining it, you've got a philosophy. Using uselessd over systemd because you need to use the uClibc library is a design decision. Deciding that we're never going to use systemd again because the maintainers are jerks and an article said it feels more like a Windows utility than a Linux utility is a philosophy. While it might generally make sense for you to not use Windows-like utilities that are maintained by jerks, if your project will not be affected by jerks or a Windows-like utility it would be rather foolish to exclude systemd from your design solely for those reasons.

Comment: Re:systemd == Windows? (Score 1) 402

by seepho (#48824563) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Migrating a Router From Linux To *BSD?
Yeah, I've had the "Athesim is a religion, too" argument before. Building a router doesn't require a philosophy -- it requires a process for getting from a world where you don't have a router to a world where you have a router you've built. If you'd like to incorporate a larger philosophy into your process, that's fine, but it's certainly not integral.

Comment: Re:A Balanced Perspective (Score 1) 402

by seepho (#48824485) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Migrating a Router From Linux To *BSD?
Thanks for all of that -- I'm surprised how much of it I actually followed. It seems like it all kind of resolves to the "use the best tool for the job" comment I made somewhere in this thread, and for what the OP wants to do he doesn't need systemd, but to take a functional system and completely rebuild it because of some principled, non-technical issue with one of the libraries doesn't seem like an effective use of ones time.

Comment: Re:Bitcoin (Score 1) 290

by seepho (#48823215) Attached to: Bitcoin Volatility Puts Miners Under Pressure
The $35/oz gold standard. The $20/oz gold standard ended in the 30s, along with many other countries discretely devaluing their currency in one form or another. Countries generally began recovering from the great depression at the point they devalued their currency relative to whatever commodity it was tied to.

Comment: Re:systemd == Windows? (Score 1) 402

by seepho (#48823069) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Migrating a Router From Linux To *BSD?
So is this all just people acting on some philosophical principle, rather than picking the best tool to complete the job they want? It sounds like the OP doesn't really know much about systemd or its alternatives and will not be interacting with it anything beyond top-level kind of stuff...but he's decided that he dislikes it because someone told him its Windows-like. Modular design is great and all, but from the OP's perspective what the hell is the difference between one big black box versus 20 smaller ones?

Comment: Re:and when BSD moves to systemd... (Score 1) 402

by seepho (#48822569) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Migrating a Router From Linux To *BSD?
I'm curious about that comment, too. The only thing I saw was this line on wikipedia...

In April 2014, Linus Torvalds expressed reservations about the attitude of a key systemd developer towards users and bug reports. In late April 2014, a campaign to boycott systemd was launched, with a website listing various reasons against its adoption.

In an August 2014 article published in InfoWorld, Paul Venezia wrote about the systemd controversy, and attributed the controversy to violation of the Unix philosophy, and to "enormous egos who firmly believe they can do no wrong." The article also characterizes the architecture of systemd as more similar to that of svchost.exe, a critical system component in Microsoft Windows with a broad functional scope.

Just seems like classic "compare any software I dislike to Windows" kind of stuff, but I'd love to hear from someone who is more familiar with it.

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