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Submission + - Microsoft silently explains Windows 10's supported lifetime of the device (

An anonymous reader writes: When Microsoft revealed that Windows 10 would be offered as a free upgrade, the company also said that Windows 10 users will get free upgrades for the supported lifetime of the device. What Microsoft has failed to do at the time was to define what that "supported lifetime of the device" actually means. This has caused some confusion and not even MVPs seem to know what Microsoft is trying to say, even with Windows 10 launching in a matter of weeks.

However, a recently-published PowerPoint presentation from Microsoft sheds some light on the matter, revealing that Windows 10 users can expect to get free upgrades for two to four years, depending on "customer type" — yet another variable.

Submission + - IBM develops first 7nm chip (

dcblogs writes: IBM says it has produced the world's first 7nm (nanometer) chip, arriving well ahead of competitors, thanks to advances in its chip technology. Chip makers are now producing 14nm processors, and the next big project for Intel and other chip makers has been the 10nm chip. IBM, in its announcement today, has upended the chip industry's development path. A 7nm chip will hold about four times as many transistors in the same area as a 14nm chip, which are now on the market. "For IBM to conquer 7nm without stopping at the 10nm that Intel is supposedly tackling, means that IBM has secured the future two steps out," said Richard Doherty, research director of Envisioneering. A big advance in creating the 7nm chip was the use of extreme ultraviolet lithography. Optical lithography, which is now used in building chips, has a wavelength of 193nm, but extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) has a wavelength of 13.5 nanometers, which carves much sharper patterns on silicon.

Submission + - NVIDIA Shakes Its Flowing Mane With Life-Like HairWorks 1.1 Demo (

MojoKid writes: Previously, you might not have thought much about a wig on a manikin, but checking out NVIDIA's latest tech demo, as a gamer or 3D graphics artists, hair can be pretty interesting. The video is of NVIDIA HairWorks 1.1, a simulation and rendering tool for creating lifelike hair and fur in video games. In the clip, NVIDIA shows off a Fabio-style hairdo with about 500,000 hairs that bounce and sway as the camera circles and forces move the hair. If this was a real wig, it might unseat one of the most boring videos ever. However, as an example of what modern 3D graphics can do with hair physics, it's pretty darn cool. Previous demos of HairWorks showed up to 22,000 strands of hair, making the jump to half a million much much more significant. The video was recorded with ShadowPlay on a GeForce GTX 980, which has some serious muscle, though it's not the most powerful card in NVIDIA's lineup. What's cooler than making life-like human hair? Putting flowing manes on vicious monsters, of course. Apparently, NVIDIA HairWorks simulation technology also plays a role in bringing more than a dozen creatures to life in The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt.

Submission + - 3D printed guns might lead to law changes in Australia ( 1

angry tapir writes: An inquiry by an Australian Senate committee has recommended the introduction of uniform laws across jurisdictions in the country "regulating the manufacture of 3D printed firearms and firearm parts". Although current laws are in general believed to cover 3D printed guns, there are concerns there may inconsistencies across different Australian jurisdictions. Although there aren't any high-profile cases of 3D printed weapons being used in crimes in the country, earlier this year a raid in Queensland recovered 3D printed firearm parts.

Submission + - Dice, what are you getting by butchering Slashdot ? 2

Taco Cowboy writes: Before I register my account with /. I frequented it for almost 3 weeks. If I were to register the first time I visited /. my account number would be in the triple digits.

That said, I want to ask Dice why they are so eager to kill off Slashdot.

Is there a secret buyer somewhere waiting to grab this domain, Dice ? Just tell us. There are those amongst us who can afford to pay for the domain. What we want is to have a Slashdot that we know, that we can use, that we can continue to share information with all others.

Please stop all your destructive plans for Slashdot, Dice.

Submission + - Google blocks YouTube app on Windows Phone (again) ( 4

dhavleak writes: From Gizmodo: Earlier today, the Microsoft-built YouTube app for Windows Phone was unceremoniously disabled by Google. These kind of little inter-corporate kerfuffles happen from time to time, and usually resolve themselves without screwing too many users. But boy, Microsoft didn't take it quietly.

Submission + - Planet in Habitable Zone only 22 Light-Years from Earth ( 2

iggymanz writes: The planet GJ 667Cc, found by data from earth-based observations, orbits once every 28 earth days in the habitable zone of a dim metal-poor M class dwarf. It is surprising to find probable rocky planet with at least 4.5 times the Earth's mass near a star of that composition. At a distance of 22 light-years, such a star could be reached by a fusion powered craft in a trip of several centuries.

Submission + - Star Wars Old Republic Doing Better than WoW (

hypnosec writes: EA has announced that Bioware's new MMO, Star Wars: the Old Republic has performed better than World of Warcraft when it was first released. During an investor call, EA's CEO John Riccitiello said that out of the two million units sold at launch, over 1.7 million of those are still playing, with each of them paying their $15 a month for the subscription. He claimed that this is a bigger uptake of paying subscribers than World of Warcraft received in its first month. This is impressive, but Blizzard's game didn't have migrating WoW fans when releasing its new game. Considering there are some two million gamers haemorraging from World of Warcraft, and the fact that SWTOR had a good intellectual property behind it, it was in a good position before it was even released — I'm not surprised it did well afterwards. Some believe though that the real test for an MMO isn't one month after launch, but one year.

Use the Force, Luke.