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Classic Games (Games)

The Return of (Old) PC Graphic Adventures 93

Posted by Soulskill
from the back-to-the-past-ure dept.
KingofGnG writes "Though they belong to a genre already considered defunct and inadequate for the mainstream video game market, adventure games have a glorious past, a past that deserves to be remembered, and, of course, replayed. At the center of a good part of this effort of collective memory, there is ScummVM, the virtual machine which acts like an interface between the feelings and the puzzles from the good old times and the modern operating systems. As already highlighted before, the ScummVM target has grown immensely over time, going from the simple support of the 'classic' adventure games par excellence published by Lucasfilm/Lucasarts, to a range that includes virtually any single puzzle-solving game developed from the beginning of time up to the advent of the (Windows) NT platform. The last video game engine added to ScummVM within the past few days is Groovie, created by the software house Trilobyte for its first title released in 1993, The 7th Guest ."
Role Playing (Games)

How Gamers View Their MMOs 132

Posted by Soulskill
from the ooo-shiny-objects dept.
GamerDNA is trying out what they call their Discovery Engine, a system that uses metadata from users to classify games and identify which have similar traits. Massively describes it thus: "Once the gamerDNA community continues to contribute to something like this, it builds up an enormous database of terminology based on actual player knowledge, not just shiny PR words thrown together to promote a game. These search terms can end up being unique to a specific genre, and ultimately lead gamers to exactly the types of games they're looking for." GamerDNA tested the system out on some of the popular MMOs, and they've posted the results. They look at how MMO players identify themselves within the game, how they describe the setting, and what basic descriptive phrases they use in reference to the games.
United States

+ - Fox News Excludes Ron Paul from Presidential Debat->

Submitted by kaynaan
kaynaan (1180525) writes "Fox News has excluded Ron Paul from participating in the last debate the weekend before the primary election begins. The debated occurs on January 6, less than one day after two back to back Republican and Democratic debates are being held at the same location. IANAL but isn't this going too far even for FOX ?? http://www.gambling911.com/Ron-Paul-123007.html"
Link to Original Source
Operating Systems

+ - Microsoft Windows rated Most Secure OS

Submitted by
PenguinBoyDave
PenguinBoyDave writes "Microsoft is frequently dinged for having insecure products, with security holes and vulnerabilities. But Symantec, no friend of Microsoft, said in its latest research report that when it comes to widely-used operating systems, Microsoft is doing better overall than its leading commercial competitors.

Read the entire article here: http://www.internetnews.com/security/article.php/3 667201"
Novell

+ - Novell introduces Linux thin client

Submitted by daria42
daria42 (866794) writes "One of the headaches of introducing an open source solution to a business is the work that has to be done in making a solution fit-for-purpose once the software has been acquired. Novell is hoping to make that process slightly easier with a thin-client version of Suse Linux that comes with a tool third parties can use to create a finished, tailored system."
Space

+ - NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts

Submitted by
Maggie McKee
Maggie McKee writes "NASA will likely shut down its Institute for Advanced Concepts, which funds research into futuristic — and often far-out — ideas in spaceflight and aeronautics, officials say. "This is one of the few places at NASA that embodies far-thinking, new stuff," NASAWatch editor Keith Cowing says. "When they're cutting stuff like this, they're desperate, or stupid, or both." The move was apparently motivated by a lack of money in NASA's budget — a problem that led to much criticism last year, when the agency cut science funding to pay for overruns in the shuttle program. But shutting down the institute to save $4 million in NASA's annual $17 billion budget shows NASA is now "going after nickels and dimes," Cowing says."
Censorship

+ - NFL Caught Abusing the DMCA

Submitted by
Implied Oral Consent
Implied Oral Consent writes "You know how the NFL puts up those notices before every game saying "This telecast is copyrighted by the NFL for the private use of our audience, and any other use of this telecast or of any pictures, descriptions or accounts of the game without the NFL's consent is prohibited"? Well, Ars Technica is reporting that Wendy Seltzer thought that that was over-reaching and posted a video of the notice on YouTube. Predictably, the NFL filed a DMCA Take Down notice on the clip. But Ms. Seltzer knows her rights, so she filed a DMCA Counter Notice. This is when the NFL violated the DMCA, by filing another Take Down notice instead of taking the issue to court — their only legitimate option, according to the DMCA. Unfortunately for the NFL, Ms. Seltzer is a law professor, an EFF lawyer, and the founder of Chilling Effects. Oops!"
Privacy

FBI Says Paper Trails Are Optional 244

Posted by kdawson
from the we-don'-need-no-steenkin' dept.
WerewolfOfVulcan writes "According to this Washington Post article, the FBI says that it doesn't have to comply with even the unconstitutional provisions of the Patriot Act when asking for phone records. Apparently that whole due process thing doesn't include them. Funny thing is, they've apparently already been doing it for years." Quoting: "Under past procedures, agents sent 'exigent circumstances letters' to phone companies, seeking toll records by asserting there was an emergency. Then they were expected to issue a grand jury subpoena or a 'national security letter,' which legally authorized the collection after the fact. Agents often did not follow up with that paperwork, the inspector general's investigation found. The new instructions tell agents there is no need to follow up with national security letters or subpoenas. The agents are also told that... they may make requests orally, with no paperwork sent to phone companies. Such oral requests have been made over the years in terrorism and kidnapping cases, officials said."
Software

+ - Microsoft to Open Source FoxPro

Submitted by
rah1420
rah1420 writes "Microsoft has announced that it will open-source the core portions of the Visual FoxPro DBMS (database management system) software to its CodePlex community development site. At the same time, Microsoft has announced that it will no longer be making new versions of the FoxPro DBMS. Story here."
Microsoft

+ - Vista: Not just another pretty face

Submitted by Bob_the_Builder
Bob_the_Builder (666) writes "An in-depth look at Vista argues that the new OS is far more than a pretty shell slapped on top of the same underlying components. In fact, what's under the hood represents a complete reworking of many OS subsystems, and it will determine the direction of Windows development for the next several generations of the OS. "Even after the false starts and scaled-back plans, Vista is still a huge evolution in the history of the NT platform, and that's not something to be sniffed at. The fundamental changes to the platform are of a scale not seen since the release of NT." Is Vista a bigger deal than many critics have said?"
Privacy

+ - Thumbprint required to buy a car in Southern CA

Submitted by
saccade.com
saccade.com writes "Here's an insidious use of biometrics: A southern California car dealership actually refuses to sell you a car unless you submit your thumbprint. From the posting:

The dealership claimed that the fingerprinting was for my protection. To make sure I'm really who I say I am, and haven't just stolen someone's social security number.

But I don't get it. How does that work? No one's checking to make sure the fingerprint I leave matches the one on file with the DMV. There's no forensics expert on staff. And I don't have data on this but I feel pretty certain that any car thief worth his salt probably already has more than one set of prints on file.
...
Dollar Rent-A-Car tried fingerprinting their customers for a while. They gave up after realizing that it had no effect on fraud or theft. Simply, treating your customers like felons is bad for business.
"

Heuristics are bug ridden by definition. If they didn't have bugs, then they'd be algorithms.

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