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Comment 'Twas I and My Four Hundred Nineteen Potatoes (Score 4, Funny) 97

From: Mr. Dave Fu Wong
Seoul, South Korea.

I will introduce myself I am Mr. Dave Fu Wong, a potato farmer working in a field in South Korea Until now I am the master potato grower of three million hectres to most of the South Korea government kitchens and I have since discovered that most of the potatoes lay dormant in silos with a lot of starch in the silo on further investigation I found out that one particular silo belong to the former president of South Korean MR PARK CHUNG HEE, who ruled south Korean from 1963-1979 and this particular silo has a deposit of grade A lucky golden variety potato with no next of kin. As you know, lucky goldens do not only taste like food from the gods but can be consumed raw like an apple as well as grown anywhere even during the winter.

My proposal is that since I am the master potato growing officer and the potatoes or the silo is dormant and there is no next of kin obviously the potato owner the former president of South Korea has died long time ago, that you should provide an account for the potatoes to be transferred.

The potatoes that are floating in the silo right now are some fifty kilotonnes and this is what I want to transfer to your farm in Idoho for our mutual benefit South Korean post office is so super efficient that a single postage stamp will get these potatoes to you post haste! Unfortunately postage stamp cost fifty Korean currencies or $10,000 American Dollars (apologies for your economy) please send bank account information or cash money order for immediate shipping.

Please if this is okay by you I will advice that you contact me through my direct email address.

Please this transaction should be kept confidential. For your assistance as the account owner we shall share the potatoes on equal basis.

Your reply will be appreciated,

Thank you.

Dave Fu Wong

Comment Re:toposhaba (Score 1) 792

And a GPS can't be removed and left at home? Slightly harder but come on. ...

GPS is not a perfect solution either. I have used several different models including the Pharos GPS with Streets and Trips. They often jump temporarily to another state or place on the globe and then after a few minutes jump back. So are we going to be able to challenge the 3000 mile trip we supposedly took on our way to grocery store? I have an idea just give me a check for 150million and I'll tell them it won't work.

Comment Re:Biblical? (Score 1) 347

Conversely, the 'brights' (don't tell Dawkins about this!) would be producing lots more free-radicals than normal. I sure hope they also have more efficient repair mechanisms in place to mop them up.

If this was common I'm sure we would soon have some sort of discrimination against "brights" for mucking up the gene pool... a great time to take up the old Three Mile Island chant

Hell No, We don't GLOW!


Submission + - EULA crossout utility 1

Maximum Prophet writes: I know that slashdot isn't the place to go for legal advice, and the EULAs have not been tested well in court but this is more of a thought experiment.

If you are presented with a contract by a company, you can cross out sections of the contract that you can't live with. If the company's agent accepts that contract, they are bound by it. (subject to vagaries of contract law)

If I were to write a utility that would allow me to virtually cross out sections of an electronic EULA, and then the program (the owner's agent) accepted that modified EULA, would both parties be bound by the new contract? What if my utility allowed me to add sections as well. i.e. If this MS program crashed, MS will pay me $1,000,000

Most EULAs will allow you to print them before accepting them. I could make the same modifications to the paper copy as well. Even if there was a pre-clause that said the EULA couldn't be modified, I could cross that out too.

So would the existence of such a program mean the end of EULAs as we know them? Would software publishers have to fall back to straight copyright and save the legal mumbo-jumbo?

It is easier to change the specification to fit the program than vice versa.