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Comment: Re:Done us all a favor (Score 1) 629

Just to back up CanHasDIY:
"In recent years we have seen a variety of measures introduced that undermine the right to protest and freedom of speech.
Laws intended to combat anti-social behaviour, terrorism and serious crime are routinely used against legitimate protesters.
Broadly drafted anti-terrorism offences of 'encouragement' and 'glorification' of terrorism threaten to make careless talk a crime.
Membership of certain organisations can be banned under anti-terror laws even if the organisation is non-violent and political.
Hate speech laws have been extended in a piecemeal way to ban ever-expanding categories of speech.
Broad anti-terrorism powers of stop and search have been used to harass and stifle peaceful protesters.
Protest around Parliament has been severely restricted by laws limiting and overly regulating the right to assemble and protest around Parliament."
Source: http://www.liberty-human-rights.org.uk/human-rights/free-speech/

It's really quite scary...

Comment: Re:Done us all a favor (Score 1) 629

I'm not saying I don't think it is a serious violation of human rights, only that it probably has limited practical implications for me. There always differences, also in healthcare, but given that I'm not poor or ill, it'll probably have few implications for me.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_they_came...

Comment: Re:"Coin exchanges have a terrible track record" (Score 1) 179

by scotjam (#44068517) Attached to: Five predictions for (Bit)coin
I suspect the (very valid) reason they have withdrawal limits on exchanges is to provide some level of security; with withdrawal limits, they can limit the damage that a nefarious user can inflict upon the rest of the exchange's users by rolling back transactions. See https://support.mtgox.com/entries/20224998-Huge-Bitcoin-sell-off-due-to-a-compromised-account-rollback

+ - PayPal Denies Teen Reward for Finding Bug->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "You have to be 18 to qualify for PayPal's bug bounty program, a minor detail that 17-year old Robert Kugler found out the hard way after being denied a reward for a website bug he reported. Curiously, the age guideline isn't in the terms and conditions posted on the PayPal website. Kugler was informed by email that he was disqualified because of his age."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Bad idea. (Score 1) 505

I disagree.

In the UK, it is illegal to share internet without mandatory log in (registration can be free, but it *must* be required for the operator to stay out of trouble).

If registration were not required by law, I would be sharing my access already. Given that registration is "required to be required", and given that it is complex for a part-time geek such as myself to set up a registration system, I don't make the extra effort to share.

I do think, though, that there are plenty of people like myself who would be happy to share without setting up registration if they weren't then subject to prosecution.
China

+ - China Reviewing Game Consoles Ban->

Submitted by jones_supa
jones_supa (887896) writes "Chinese government is discussing whether to lift its 12-year ban on game consoles which was established due to fear of harming the physical and mental development of the young. Even during this period consoles have been sold illegally and things like Kinect can be sold for other purposes such as medical treatment and education. Major game console vendors across the world made several attempts but failed to find a way to enter the Chinese mainland market officially, even though they have solid manufacturing bases there. 'We are reviewing the policy and have conducted some surveys and held discussions with other ministries on the possibility of opening up the game console market,' a source from the Ministry of Culture, who asked not to be named, said."
Link to Original Source
Science

+ - Poor Sleep Prevents Brain From Storing Memories-> 2

Submitted by jjp9999
jjp9999 (2180664) writes "Recent findigns published on Jan. 27 in the journal Nature Neuroscience may inspire you to get some proper sleep. Researchers at UC Berkley found that REM sleep plays a key role in moving short term memories from the hippocampus (where short-term memories are stored) to the prefrontal cortex (where long-term memories are stored), and that degeneration of the frontal lobe as we grow older may play a key role in forgetfulness. "What we have discovered is a dysfunctional pathway that helps explain the relationship between brain deterioration, sleep disruption and memory loss as we get older – and with that, a potentially new treatment avenue," said UC Berkeley sleep researcher Matthew Walker."
Link to Original Source

+ - Whitehouse Petition to Repeal DMCA->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Given the recent criminalization under the DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) for unlocking your cell phone for use on another network, a petition has been created at whitehouse.gov to repeal the DMCA. If you're a United States citizen, and believe the DMCA is too broad and harsh (e.g. makes it illegal to circumvent protection for fair use, even if no copyright law is violated), then signing the petition is one way to make your voice heard.

I also encourage you to write to your Congressional representatives, or contact them through opencongress.org."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Let the bashing begin! (Score 1) 268

by scotjam (#42688931) Attached to: Microsoft Surface Pro Arrives Feb. 9
90% of tablets not having features isn't trying to imply that they will have 90% market share

Aside from that, it could well end up with 10% share if they get it right. Business users. Microsoft office won't run on any other OS, and the tablet alternatives suck (I know, it's probably MS's fault they suck due to ever-changing standards, but that doesn't change the fact that for a business user, they suck).

Comment: Re:More maths (Score 1) 328

by scotjam (#42288965) Attached to: Is It Worth Investing In a High-Efficiency Power Supply?
Like your kids, I almost exclusively use cheap or very old PSUs. Sure, sometimes they blow up or cause instability, but when they work it's beautifully cheap. Same with RAM. Sometimes you get unlucky, but a lot of the time you don't need to spend a fortune. As long as you don't go *rock* bottom, they tend to work fine.

Like hard drives though, they should be viewed as a "consumable" item.

Comment: Re:Mobile bandwidth (Score 1) 261

by scotjam (#41753745) Attached to: The UK's 5-Minute 4G Data Cap
http://www.rogers.com/web/link/hispeedBrowseFlowDefaultPlans

"Up to 150 Mbps download speed available in select areas
Up to 10 Mbps upload speed available in select areas
250 GB monthly usage allowance
9 Emails and a suite of options

$122.99 per month"

(Note: this indeed appears to be for regular (wired) internet access, not mobile broadband)

So yes, it would probably take longer than 24 hours to use this up, but a 250gb limit is ridiculous for your fastest and most expensive package. In the UK, ISPs such as Sky or BT provide unthrottled access for c. £25 + £15 line rental per month; you can easily download more than 250gb using one of those puny 20Mbit ADSL connections (which in reality probably means

It's not water or oxygen, but it does enable a lot of cool things, and there's no reason for it to be so expensive compared to other Western nations.

Comment: Re:Responsibility? (Score 1) 321

by scotjam (#41622889) Attached to: Judge Orders Piracy Trial To Test IP Address Evidence
There's trouble (a parking ticket with a $100 fine) and then there's trouble

The burden of proof for the latter (or any other life-ruining penalty) should be much higher. This is not proportionate, even if it is proven that she did it herself.

Blaming her for negligence doesn't make sense. IANAL, but poor / no security (e.g. a failure to encrypt an internet connection or encrypting it with WEP, leaving a car unlocked that is subsequently used to commit a crime etc.) is not an act of negligence that should result in penalties such as these in any rational legal system.

If anyone disagrees, can they please represent me against Sony for exposing my credit card details (as part of the PSN hack)?

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