Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

+ - "Thermoelectrics" Could One Day Power Cars->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Fossil fuels power modern society by generating heat, but much of that heat is wasted. Researchers have tried to reclaim some of it with semiconductor devices called thermoelectrics, which convert the heat into power. But they remain too inefficient and expensive to be useful beyond a handful of niche applications. Now, scientists in Illinois report that they have used a cheap, well-known material to create the most heat-hungry thermoelectric so far. In the process, the researchers say, they learned valuable lessons that could push the materials to the efficiencies needed for widespread applications. If that happens, thermoelectrics could one day power cars and scavenge energy from myriad engines, boilers, and electrical plants."
Link to Original Source

+ - Deep Brain Stimulation Triggers Hallucinations->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "A new study has found the area in the brain responsible for hallucinations. Brain scans of an epilepsy patient revealed a shrunken spot near his hippocampus—the brain’s memory center. Studies had shown that this region—known as the parahippocampal place area (PPA)—was involved with recognizing of scenes and places. Doctors reconfirmed this by showing the patient pictures of a house and seeing the PPA light up on brain scans with functional magnetic resonance imaging. To assess if the PPA was ground zero for seizures, the doctors used a routine procedure that involves shooting soft jolts of electricity into the region and seeing if the patient senses an oncoming seizure. Rather than have déjà vu, the patient’s surroundings suddenly changed as he hallucinated places familiar to him. In one instance, the doctors morphed into the Italians from his local pizza place."
Link to Original Source

+ - Are Beards About to Die Out?->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Beards are everywhere these days. From the urban lumberjacks of Brooklyn to the hirsute hackers of San Francisco, men’s faces have taken a turn for the hairy. But according to one theory of evolutionary population dynamics, the look is destined to die down because of its own popularity. And now an experiment involving 3 dozen bearded men lends credence to the prediction."
Link to Original Source

+ - Not Everyone Needs Probiotics, Suggests Study of Hunter-Gatherer Guts->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "After taking an antibiotic or catching an intestinal bug, many of us belt down probiotic drinks to restore the “natural balance” of organisms in our intestines. Probiotics are one of the fastest growing products in the food industry, now added to yogurts, drinks, and baby food. Yet, not everyone needs them to stay healthy. A new study of the gut bacteria of hunter-gatherers in Africa has found that they completely lack a bacterium that is a key ingredient in most probiotic foods and considered healthy. What’s more, the Hadza don’t suffer from colon cancer, colitis, Crohn’s, or other diseases of the colon that are found in humans eating modern diets in Western nations."
Link to Original Source

+ - U.S. Biomedical Research 'Unsustainable,' Prominent Researchers Warn->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "The U.S. biomedical science system "is on an unsustainable path" and needs major reform, four prominent researchers say. Researchers should "confront the dangers at hand,” the authors write, and “rethink” how academic research is funded, staffed, and organized. Among other issues, the team suggests that the system may be producing too many new researchers and forcing them to compete for a stagnating pool of funding."
Link to Original Source

+ - Unhappy Marriages Due to Low Blood Sugar?-> 1

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Feeling peeved at your partner? You may want to check your blood sugar. A new study suggests that low levels of glucose in the blood may increase anger and aggression between spouses. The researchers say their findings suggest a connection between glucose and self-control, but other experts disagree about the study’s implications."
Link to Original Source

+ - Astronauts of Future Could Survive on Their Own Urine->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Future space travelers could more efficiently recycle their own urine to reclaim its water and make a little electrical power to boot. Researchers have found a way to separate the toxic byproducts of urine, leaving behind water that is safe to drink, plus chemicals that can be fed into a battery-like fuel cell. In tests, the amount of electrical power generated is small: Voltages are about 0.2 volts, and currents about 2 milliamps. But the team hopes to improve the power output in its next version of the system."
Link to Original Source

+ - Cost Skyrockets for United States' Share of ITER Fusion Project->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "ITER, the international fusion experiment under construction in Cadarache, France, aims to prove that nuclear fusion is a viable power source by creating a "burning plasma" that produces more energy than the machine itself consumes. Although that goal is at least 20 years away, ITER is already burning through money at a prodigious pace. The United States is only a minor partner in the project, which began construction in 2008. But the U.S. contribution to ITER will total $3.9 billion—roughly four times as much as originally estimated—according to a new cost estimate released yesterday. That is about $1.4 billion higher than a 2011 cost estimate, and the numbers are likely to intensify doubts among some members of Congress about continuing the U.S. involvement in the project."
Link to Original Source

+ - Measles Outbreak Traced to Fully Vaccinated Patient for First Time->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Get the measles vaccine, and you won’t get the measles—or give it to anyone else. Right? Well, not always. A person fully vaccinated against measles has contracted the disease and passed it on to others. The startling case study contradicts received wisdom about the vaccine and suggests that a recent swell of measles outbreaks in developed nations could mean more illnesses even among the vaccinated."
Link to Original Source

+ - Jet-Lagged? There's an App for That->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Smart phones can get you to the bus station, track flight delays, and monitor your sleep. Now, they may help you adjust to new time zones, too. Released yesterday, a new app called Entrain aims to help travelers restore whacked-out rhythms after long trips. The researchers who developed it got the idea while studying the mathematics of circadian rhythms. Their number crunching resulted in specialized adjustment schedules for more than 1000 travel itineraries, they report today in PLOS Computational Biology."
Link to Original Source

+ - Amoeba Eat Human Intestines, Cell by Cell->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Entamoeba histolytica is a tiny pathogen that takes a terrible toll. The single-celled parasite—an amoeba about a tenth the size of a dust mite—infects 50 million people worldwide and kills as many as 100,000 each year. Now, a new report reveals how the microbe does its deadly damage: by eating cells alive, piece by piece. The finding offers a potential target for new drugs to treat E. histolytica infections, and it transforms researchers’ understanding of how the parasite works."
Link to Original Source

+ - Embattled Stem Cell Researcher Apologizes but Defends Her Work->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "In her first appearance before the press since her claims of an astounding breakthrough in stem cell research started unraveling, Haruko Obokata, of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, Japan, apologized for the trouble she has caused her employer, her colleagues, and the scientific community. But she also firmly maintained that STAP cells, the new type of stem cells she claims to have developed, exist, and said she will not retract the two Nature papers reporting her finding."
Link to Original Source

+ - Ancient Shrimp-Like Creature Has Oldest Known Circulatory System->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "A 520-million-year-old shrimp-like creature known as Fuxianhuia protensa has the oldest known cardiovascular system, researchers report. It was both modern and unsophisticated. A simple, tubelike heart was buried in the creature’s belly—or thorax—and shot single blood vessels into the 20 or so segments of its primitive body. In contrast, x-ray scans of the specimen revealed profoundly intricate channels in the head and neck. The brain was well supplied with looping blood vessels, which extended branches into the arthropod’s alienlike eyestalks and antennae and rivaled the complexity of today’s crustaceans. From this Gordian architecture, the researchers can now speculate about the critter’s lifestyle. Its brain required abundant oxygen, so it presumably did a fair amount of thinking."
Link to Original Source

+ - Elite Violinists Fail to Distinguish Legendary Violins From Modern Fiddles->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "If you know only one thing about violins, it is probably this: A 300-year-old Stradivarius supposedly possesses mysterious tonal qualities unmatched by modern instruments. However, even elite violinists cannot tell a Stradivarius from a top-quality modern violin, a new double-blind study suggests. Like the sound of coughing during the delicate second movement of Beethoven's violin concerto, the finding seems sure to annoy some people, especially dealers who broker the million-dollar sales of rare old Italian fiddles. But it may come as a relief to the many violinists who cannot afford such prices."
Link to Original Source

+ - Eat Hard Food, Lose Weight?->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "A new study suggests that the tougher food is to eat, the less we consume—and the fewer pounds we pack on. On two consecutive days, scientists fed 50 healthy 20-somethings a lunch of hamburgers and a side of rice with vegetables. On one of the two days, each participant was served a soft bun and boiled vegetables, while on the other they ate a hard bun and raw vegetables. When they ate the tougher-to-chew lunch, participants consumed about 90 fewer calories on average, a drop of about 13% compared with the softer lunch. What’s more, they ate about the same amount for dinner both days, meaning they didn’t compensate with a larger dinner after a smaller, chewier lunch. The authors say their results suggest that slight changes in food texture could lead people to take in fewer calories in the long term, possibly helping them lose weight. Eating less, it turns out, might be as simple as eating hard."
Link to Original Source

As of next Thursday, UNIX will be flushed in favor of TOPS-10. Please update your programs.

Working...