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Comment: Re:External Wacom digitizer (Score 1) 101

by sbjornda (#48493911) Attached to: Forbes Revisits the Surface Pro 3, Which May Face LG Competition

Really? You can draw on your laptop with a digitizer? What kind of laptop is it?

Dell Inspiron mini 1012 running Xubuntu, with a Wacom Bamboo Pen digitizer plugged into a USB port.

So what's the actual workflow then when people in your office leave their desks to go to a meeting? Undock the Dell and close it, unplug the Bamboo from the dock and carry them and the stylus to the meeting, open the Dell and plug in the Bamboo? Or undock the Dell with the Bamboo plugged into its USB port and carry them both to the meeting while tethered... either one sounds awkward. I'll keep my Surface, thanks, which as an added bonus comes with a handy place to carry my stylus. Or maybe you're talking about a different use case than this subthread is. I'm undocking at least 4 or 5 times a day, typically.

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.nosig

Comment: Re:who cares? (Score 5, Interesting) 101

by sbjornda (#48490815) Attached to: Forbes Revisits the Surface Pro 3, Which May Face LG Competition

I'm having trouble understanding what the point of this product is. What useful niche does it fill?

In a fully managed enterprise environment, using OneNote to take handwritten notes in meetings - including creating quick To-Dos to send to Outlook, using handwriting to mark up Excel, Word, or PowerPoint files stored on a collaboration server so everyone's changes are synchronized, then go back to your desk and dock it so you have a full keyboard, mouse, external monitors (I have two), auto-switch from corporate WiFi to corporate LAN without losing mapped drives. In the enterprise space its competition is likely a Lenovo Helix model, not a Miix. For home users, it's probably overkill, unless maybe you do a lot of docking-and-undocking at home, but that's likely a niche market.

But if your company, like mine, allows a certain degree of personal use of the corporate device and allows you to take it home evenings and weekends, it's a lot lighter to carry and more fun to use than a traditional laptop. It's my laptop at work and my tablet at home (and yes, I know how to encrypt and back up my personal data in case my job suddenly disappears, and I still have a home PC as a second unit). It's the most satisfying and seamless personal computing experience I've ever had, and I've been in the business since the 1980's. This feels like the computer I've been waiting for all my life.

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.nosig

Comment: Re:35mm film (Score 1) 635

by sbjornda (#47790777) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Old Technology Can't You Give Up?
A couple of years ago I picked up a Pentax 67 with the personal commitment to put a few rolls of 120 through it every year. You can get great lenses for stupidly cheap prices if you keep an eye on that auction site. Provia for landscape/nature work - there's nothing like a big, brilliant transparency.

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.nosig

Comment: This is going to happen in 2038 anyway (Score 1) 187

by sbjornda (#46998875) Attached to: Do Embedded Systems Need a Time To Die?
This will happen in Jan. 2038 anyway, for many devices, because of the Year 2038 Problem http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_2038_problem. Anything keeping time using a signed, 32 bit integer that uses the Unix epoch of 1970-01-01 will be affected. I hope someone fixes that problem for pacemakers by the 2030's, just in case I need one.

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.nosig

Comment: Pilot (Score 1) 452

by sbjornda (#46485437) Attached to: Lies Programmers Tell Themselves
This is just a pilot project. Before we start rolling it out for real, we'll make sure to create the training and system documentation, the capacity plan, the backup and recovery plan, the business continuity plan, the refresh cycle plan, the communication plan, and we'll shoot an email to the Help Desk.

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.nosig

Comment: Re:CMMI is a scam (Score 1) 228

by sbjornda (#45824797) Attached to: US Requirement For Software Dev Certification Raises Questions

I would fucking kill for software developers to be licensed like an engineering displine

Out of all your rant, I agree with this. Engineering got licensing because of human deaths attributable to lack of enforceable standards. I think the same will have to happen in I.T. - some huge disaster will happen that kills thousands of people, and then the population will arm itself with torches and pitchforks and require us to police ourselves adequately and put our very livelihoods on the line each time we claim something is ready to promote to production.

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.nosig

+ - You Are What Your Dad Ate

Submitted by Freshly Exhumed
Freshly Exhumed (105597) writes "What a father eats before his child is conceived may influence the chance a baby will be born with a birth defect, a new study suggests. Much of the focus on how diet relates to birth has been done on moms. A father's diet before conception plays a crucial role in the health of his offspring, researchers in Canada suggest. Sarah Kimmins, a researcher at McGill University in Montreal, said the study focused on vitamin B9, also known as folate, which is found in green leafy vegetables, cereal, fruit and meat. The researchers found that the mouse offspring of folate-deficient fathers had a 30 percent increased risk of birth defects, compared to those offspring who had received a sufficient amount of folate."

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