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Comment Re:Teachers (Score 1) 240

Different AC here. ... P.P.S.: Fuck the last 5 years of UX "professionals" who think ... menu options should change depending on which options the software decides are more frequently used. Neither group knows anything of muscle memory because neither group has been in the industry long enough for it to matter.

Although, to be fair to UX "professionals" there is no muscle memory so powerful that it cannot be compromised with sufficient alcohol. Still getting 80wpm tonight. But somehow missed the post-anon button. Sometimes the UX "professional" doesn't have to move the clickbox. It's moving on my system, though!

Comment Re:Teachers (Score 1) 240

My touch typist teacher said RIGHT. Never considered the left.

Different AC here. Basic non-ergo Keytronic layout. I use left hand, not right hand, and I was taught touch typing (and can still do 100wpm) by a teacher who taught by the book that says "right-handed."

Even though the "6" is, properly speaking, in the "6/y/h/n" vertical row that "belongs" to the right hand, I just looked closely at my fingers on the actual physical keyboard on which I've typed for 10+ years, and its clones on which I've typed for at least 20+, it's because the "6" is closer to the left index finger than the right index finger. The pad of my hand (not the wrist, about halfway up the pad beneath my pinky finger) rests on the lower edge of my keyboard, and my thumbs rest so comfortably on the spacebar that the spacebar has a little worn spot on it.

Home exercise: Place fingers on home row. Touch right and left index fingers to "T", "Y", and "R". For my fingers and keyboard, "Y" is the most comfortable, almost dead-center. Repeat experiment with "5/6/7". For my fingers/keyboard, I can't reach "5" with right. I can't reach "7" with left, and "6" is reachable with either, but more easily reached with left finger. with left on "T" and right on "y" almost centered beneath "6", left is visually confirmed closer to "6."

(Side note: Both by size of wear spot and by observation while typing this post, I almost exclusively press the space bar with my *right* thumb. Maybe that contributes to using my left idex to hit th 6 key -- my left thumb is basically unused. I just typed this entire sentence with my left thumb crammed under the keyboard and it felt comfortable. Undoable with right thumb in equivalent positon.)

P.S; Our touch-typing teachers taught us the same way, but for me and my keyboard, we cheat on the "6". I've forgotten whether it's supposed to matter which thumb you use on the space bar, although I imagine I could have squeezed out a couple of extra wpm if I'd used both thumbs in high school.

P.P.S.: Fuck the last 5 years of UX "professionals" who think everything has to change every six months for the hell of it, or the last 15 years who think that menu options should change depending on which options the software decides are more frequently used. Neither group knows anything of muscle memory because neither group has been in the industry long enough for it to matter.

Networking

Bruce Schneier On Cisco ROMMON Firmware Exploit: "This Is Serious" 57

When Bruce Schneier says of a security problem "This is serious," it makes sense to pay attention to it. And that's how he refers to a recently disclosed Cisco vulnerability alert about "an evolution in attacks against Cisco IOS Classic platforms. Cisco has observed a limited number of cases where attackers, after gaining administrative or physical access to a Cisco IOS device, replaced the Cisco IOS ROMMON (IOS bootstrap) with a malicious ROMMON image." Schneier links to Ars Technica's short description of the attack, which notes The significance of the advisory isn't that the initial firmware can be replaced. As indicated, that's a standard feature not only with Cisco gear but just about any computing device. What's important is that attackers are somehow managing to obtain the administrative credentials required to make unauthorized changes that take control of the networking gear.

Submission + - Malvertising ads infest websites with 100++ million visitors->

An anonymous reader writes: Angler exploit's SSL malvertising campaign source and details from MalwareBytes https://blog.malwarebytes.org/... infesting sites like:

weather.com 121M visits per month
drudgereport.com 61.8M visits per month
wunderground.com 49.9M visits per month
findagrave.com 6M visits per month
webmaila.juno.com 3.6M visits per month
my.netzero.net 3.2M visits per month
sltrib.com 1.8M visits per month

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Windows 10's Privacy Policy: the New Normal?->

An anonymous reader writes: The launch of Windows 10 brought a lot of users kicking and screaming to the "connected desktop." "This is very useful, but obviously has privacy implications: the online service providers can track which devices are making which requests, which devices are near which Wi-Fi networks, and feasibly might be able to track how devices move around. The service providers will all claim that the data is anonymized, and that no persistent tracking is performed... but it almost certainly could be." There are privacy concerns, particularly for default settings. According to Peter Bright, for better or worse this is the new normal for mainstream operating systems. We're going to have to either get used to it, or get used to fighting with settings to turn it all off. "The days of mainstream operating systems that don't integrate cloud services, that don't exploit machine learning and big data, that don't let developers know which features are used and what problems occur, are behind us, and they're not coming back. This may cost us some amount of privacy, but we'll tend to get something in return: software that can do more things and that works better."
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Def Con: Hacker Shows How to "Kill" Anyone-> 1

wiredmikey writes: Hackers the Def Con gathering in Las Vegas on Friday got schooled in how to be online killers. A rush to go digital with the process of registering deaths has made it simple for maliciously minded folks to have someone who is alive declared dead by the authorities.

"This is a global problem," Australian computer security specialist Chris Rock said as he launched a presentation titled "I Will Kill You."

Link to Original Source

Submission + - No Immunity For Cops Who Sent A SWAT Team To A 68-Year-Old Woman's House->

An anonymous reader writes: Earlier this year, we covered the story of Louise Milan, a 68-year-old grandmother whose house was raided by a SWAT team (accompanied by a news crew) searching for someone who had made alleged threats against police officers over the internet. Part of the probable cause submitted for the warrant was Milan's IP address.

But the police made no attempt to verify whether any resident of Milan's house made the threats and ignored the fact that the IP address was linked to an open WiFi connection.

Link to Original Source

Comment Re:When guns are outlawed... (Score 3, Interesting) 62

Eh, it's kind of like your Android phone not making root readily available. It's there to protect the unwashed masses from themselves. Serious hobbyists (or bad actors) don't have much difficulty getting around the restrictions. I don't think anyone seriously thinks that "geofencing" software will keep a terrorist from flying a drone into restricted airspace. What it will do is keep the "hold my beer and watch this!" crowd from flying their drone into the glide path of a 747.

Comment Re:Remember when the Internet was uncontrolled? (Score 3, Insightful) 121

remember, Facebook != Internet

It is to many people, particularly those that came of age after the internet went mainstream, as well as those that are older and less technically adept.

Like it or hate it, Facebook is the Internet to a lot of people. Try having a brick and mortar business these days without a presence on Facebook. There are countless people that will go looking for something on Facebook long before they think of a simple Google search. Why do you think Google has invested so much effort into social media despite their many failures? They're terrified of people like this.

At the rate things are going the "dark web" isn't going to be warez, criminals, and black hats; it's going to be anything that's not on Facebook and Twitter.

Comment Re:Remember when the Internet was uncontrolled? (Score 3, Interesting) 121

The EU isn't a defensive alliance; that's what NATO is for and Turkey is already a NATO member. One that's keeping us from forming a coherent policy against ISIS, incidentally, since our natural allies in the region and only proven effective anti-ISIS force happen to be Turkey's sworn enemy.

Comment Remember when the Internet was uncontrolled? (Score 5, Insightful) 121

When USENET, IRC, and other mediums that were hard to censor were the rule rather than the exception? Now the "go to" places are all for profit enterprises, Facebook, Twitter, Google, et. al. They may profess to follow Western ideals, they may even actually believe in them, but when push comes to shove they'll always do what's necessary to enrich the bottom line.

As an aside, I wonder why the EU is hesitant to consider admitting Turkey? Or why the United States insists on advocating in favor of such a course of action.

Software production is assumed to be a line function, but it is run like a staff function. -- Paul Licker

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