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Comment: Re:No Trust (Score 1) 153

by sacrilicious (#49086779) Attached to: Samsung Smart TVs Don't Encrypt the Voice Data They Collect
Yes, because now *everyone* listening at any stage of the transmission is privy to conversations in your home. Your ISP, for example. Your neighbor with whom you share a router, or someone who takes the trouble to crack your WEP (assuming you have encryption on your network, some people are still not that sophisticated).

Comment: Re:why start after the fact? (Score 4, Insightful) 219

Exactly. If the police get to unilaterally characterize what happened up to the point of tasing, what the hell does it matter that we've got footage of the hapless subject on the ground convulsing? How about if we throw the police in jail and start recording the court proceedings as soon as the iron door has slammed shut on them as they start their sentence, sounds like about the same thing.

Comment: This doesn't take a genius (Score 3, Insightful) 166

by sacrilicious (#48745781) Attached to: Finding Genghis Khan's Tomb From Space

Genghis Khan really, really didn't want anyone to know where he was buried. The soldiers escorting his body to its final resting place killed everyone they passed, killed the people who built the tomb, and then were killed themselves.

First guy: Hey dude, do you know how to find Genghis K's tomb?

Second guy: Yeah, just follow the trail of blood and dead bodies.

Comment: But snooped on with what? (Score 3, Interesting) 96

by sacrilicious (#47711743) Attached to: Your Phone Can Be Snooped On Using Its Gyroscope

Researchers will demonstrate the process used to spy on smartphones using gyroscopes at Usenix Security event on August 22, 2014. Researchers from Stanford and a defense research group at Rafael will demonstrate a way to spy on smartphones using gyroscopes at Usenix Security event on August 22, 2014. According to the "Gyrophone: Recognizing Speech From Gyroscope Signals" study, the gyroscopes integrated into smartphones were sensitive enough to enable some sound waves to be picked up, transforming them into crude microphones.

I can't help but feel like there are gyroscopes involved in this process somehow...

Stinginess with privileges is kindness in disguise. -- Guide to VAX/VMS Security, Sep. 1984

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