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Comment: Re:What basis for this case? (Score 1) 75

> You could say "give me the source code or I'll sue you for beeeelions" and they can say "Ok, sue us", lose the case, pay billions and keep their source code.

... and be charged with contempt if they continue to distribute without a license.

And aside, it seems likely that part of the judgement would include "cough up the source code, mac."

Comment: Re:Is this really a victory though? (Score 1) 89

by sabt-pestnu (#46373011) Attached to: Lawrence Lessig Wins Fair Use Case

A different article on this story (think it was techdirt) describes the situation:

If a party basically offers to settle for terms that match what it would likely get in a final court ruling, and the other party doesn't accept, courts tend to look very negatively on that situation.

That is "you won, what the heck are you still doing in my courtroom?"

Comment: Re:Net Neutrality was BAD. Full stop. (Score 1) 383

by sabt-pestnu (#45956793) Attached to: Federal Court Kills Net Neutrality, Says FCC Lacks Authority.

- when the NSA coopted Google and AT&T and Verizon and a bunch of other major corporations to spy on everybody..

FTFY... When some goon with a gun (even if it is a gun shaped like a law) points it at you and says "hand over the goods", you've only got two choices: obey or not. Your prospects for an immediate future are severely limited with one of those choices.

And if you obey often enough, it becomes habit.

Comment: Re:Efficiency. (Score 1) 937

by sabt-pestnu (#45912327) Attached to: Who Is Liable When a Self-Driving Car Crashes?

Read the posts above. Gearing makes a difference.

Once the speed limit was set at 55, most cars being produced for the American market were geared for 55 being the typical cruising speed, and higher gears were stripped out, perhaps for weight reduction, perhaps for cost reduction.

Either way, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy: gear a car to drive optimally at speed X, and it will do so.

Note that you can get cheap back-pats pointing out "this car's mileage starts dropping off at (speed X) instead of (speed Y)", where a better picture comes from comparing mileage for both vehicles over the range of speeds.

Comment: Re:couple of thoughts (Score 1) 549

by sabt-pestnu (#45588989) Attached to: RF Safe-Stop Shuts Down Car Engines With Radio Pulse

Just a couple of things:

If you're HERF gun is extremely directional, you're golden.

If not, you've got two options...
1) you fire it, and suddenly BOTH of you are coasting to a stop (or crash)
2) you get your buddies to fire it from the roadside, in which case the police coast to a stop right near your buddies.

Of course, a remote control could cover for your buddies, especially if there's a camera or spotter set up.

(Yeah, we've seen remote control munitions for HOW LONG now?)

Comment: Re:Cost-benefit analysis (Score 1) 319

by sabt-pestnu (#45545077) Attached to: NY Police Get Tall SUVs To Combat Texting While Driving

There are minimum legal vehicle standards. And behavior standards. Your reasons do not well distinguish between falling within and without of them; your gripes are analog.

By the same logic, you would be offended because...
- I drive a lighter vehicle, being more at risk of injury.
- I drive a vehicle with poorer handling, increasing the likelihood of an accident, or reducing my ability to dodge an accident.
- I drive a vehicle more prone to mechanical failures (older, less reliable, other), increasing the likelihood of closing the road.
- I have some other medical condition that causes problems and/or expense when I'm to be pulled from a vehicle. Say, hemophilia, obesity, or age.

Each of the costs you have described apply as well to one more of the scenarios above. And yet, the vehicle and driver may well fall within acceptable standards for driving (and being driven).

As for your health care premium worries, the insurance companies do account for seat belt use (or lack of it). I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader.

Comment: Re:The "hype" of 3D printing? (Score 1) 152

by sabt-pestnu (#45417613) Attached to: A Makerbot In Every Classroom

Hate to say it, but composting 3d printed materials is every bit as likely as biodegrading biodegradable plastic bags. Not every home (or apartment complex) has a composing unit, nor a use for the final product.

This leaves two options: ship the 3d printed refuse where it can be used, or throw it in the general trash cycle. Until it becomes ubiquitous, it won't get shipped commercially (IE with "recyclable" items.

If you can't get folks to "properly dispose" of batteries or fluorescent bulbs or electronics, you won't get folks to compost 3d printed refuse.

Comment: Throttle piracy! Yay! (Score 2) 222

by sabt-pestnu (#45416437) Attached to: Legislation Would Prohibit ISPs From Throttling Online Video Services

The bill being discussed is a very limited form of the Network Neutrality concept.

> given how many copyright violations ...

By that metric, http and https do not deserve protection either. Consider the many many sites that have "pirated" movies, images, lyrics, term papers, basic research available through those protocols.

I find your ragging on the torrent protocol based on the content moved by it disturbing. But you've hit the inference on the head, though: netflix and youtube have a lot of money riding on "neutrality" for their content. Bittorrent does not.

Comment: Linkrot (Score 1) 510

The Business insider link fires back a page that either requires JS (which I did not enable), or requires agreement to a terms-of-service and privacy policy (which I did not submit to, to read a fricking article).

The "thetechherald" article returns "page not found".

Are there alternative sources for your information? Archive links you could provide?

Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it.

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