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Submission + - Latest US export: fracking around with local democracy in Poland (

rysiek writes: The village of urawlów in eastern Poland has fertile soil and beautiful landscapes. It is also positioned directly above Poland's largest aquifiers. Soon another element will pop-up — fracking rigs, courtesy of Chevron.

For the past two years a small but dedicated community of people have opposed and protested Chevron's planned shale gas exploitation in the area, on the grounds of the environmental effects, including possible aquifier contaminations and damage to local landscape. Of course, they also support Exxon Mobil executive Rex Tillerson's fight against fracking rigs in his own back yard (Google Translate).

Chevron responds with legal action, with the support of local authorities. The protesters, who are so far quite effective in blocking Chevron's local activities, demand transparency the right to decide their own fate.

Submission + - Falkvinge: Engstrom, not Andersdotter, should be Swedish Pirates' #1 ( 1

rysiek writes: Rick Falkvinge has weighed-in on whom should the Swedish Pirates place on the all important #1 place on the ballot: Christian Engstrom. Why?

The reason is simple: between him and the other candidate for the ballot’s top position, Christian is the only one funding my keynoting and evangelizing

So even among the Pirates, is it always about the money? This has not garnered too positive a response, especially in the light of the fact that the "other candidate" is Amelia Andersdotter who, as some would argue, does a better job. The heat is on, including a twitter conversation (and a Diaspora hashtag for the decentralites among you).

Submission + - At CopyCamp: Polish MEP proposes legalizing filesharing, remix (

rysiek writes: When one of the biggest collection societies in Poland, Google, and Warsaw Hackerspace partner with a copyright reformist NGO to organize a conference with Eben Moglen as the keynote speaker and Jérémie Zimmermann following right behind, nobody expects a politician to be the actual star of the evening. Yet this is exactly what has happened few days ago at CopyCamp — where a Polish MEP, Pawel Zalewski, proposed no less than legalizing non-commercial filesharing and remix, with shortening the copyright term to 50 years as icing on the cake.

The details are scant and the proposal is still being worked on, to be presented in Brussels in November.

Submission + - Has anyone succeeded with Akonadi? ( 2

rysiek writes: Development of KMail2 and Akonadi has been well underway for years now, yet it still seems far from achieving the level of usability and usefullness KMail 1.x had. Duplicate and lost e-mails, serious performance issues, migration problems and missing features prompt users to ask for being "saved" from Akonadi goodness and bloggers to warn about it.

With all major KDE-carrying distributions moving off of KMail 1.x and into the uncertain waters of KMail2, has anyone actually succeeded with Akonadi?

Submission + - PayPal freezes MailPile's account ( 1

rysiek writes: Remember MailPile the privacy-focused, community-funded FOSS webmail project with built-in GPG support? The good news is, the funding campaign is a success, with $135k raised (the goal was $100k). The bad news is, PayPal froze MailPile's account, along with $45k that was on it, and will not un-freeze it until MailPile team provides "an itemized budget and your development goal dates for your project" . One of the team members also noted: "Communications with PayPal have implied that they would use any excuse available to them to delay delivering as much of our cash as possible for as long as possible.". PayPal doesn't have a great track record as far as fund freezing is concerned — maybe it's high time to stop using PayPal?

Submission + - The Shortest Internet Censorship Debate Ever (

rysiek writes: When a politician starts talking about defending the innocence of children, there's bound to be a great policy initiative ahead. That's how British PM David Cameron introduced the British porn block. That's also how the Polish Minister of Justice started his remark yesterday morning on how good an idea it is and that it should be introduced in Poland. This started the shortest Internet censorship debate ever, as in the evening of the same day the polish Prime Minister and the Minister of Administration and Digitization denounced any such ideas:

We shall not block access to legal content regardless of whether or not it appeases us aesthetically or ethically

There had been several full-blown Internet censorship debates in Poland during last 4 years. Apparently the arguments against it were not lost on at least some of Polish politicians.

Submission + - Copyright-reform activists sue entertainment industry lobbyist (

rysiek writes: Two well-known Polish copyright-reform activists apparently got fed up with being called names. Alek Tarkowski (Creative Commons Poland coordinator) and Igor Ostrowski (former under-secretary of state at the Polish Ministry of Administration and Digitization), both of anti-ACTA fame, are suing (Google translate) Maciej Strzembosz — a film-maker and chairman of MPAA-like National Chamber of Audio-Video Producers — for libel over being called "ideologues of on-line thievery" and "Google agents", repeatedly.

This seems to have high pop-corn potential.


Submission + - Google doesn't support OpenDocument Format (

rysiek writes: "After killing off support for old Microsoft formats, Google apparently decided to turn against OpenDocument Format (used by LibreOffice, OpenOffice and many other office suites).

The support for ODF is lacking from Chromebooks, Android phones, Google Drive and QuickOffice. However, Microsoft's controversial OOXML seems to be supported well."


Submission + - Polish MP returns iPad quoting lack of control (

rysiek writes: "Polish MP and spokesperson for one of Polish political parties Dariusz Joski returned his state-issued iPad citing lack of control (Google-translated). Polish Free and Open Source Software Foundation (of Anti-ACTA fame) offered (free of charge, of course) to help him choose, install and configure Linux on his laptop, including setting-up disk encryption.

We are still waiting for an answer from the MP."

The Internet

Submission + - Polish PM 7-hour debate about ACTA, also on IRC

rysiek writes: "Last Monday a debate about ACTA (Google translation) was held in the Chancellery of the Polish Prime Minister, with all interested parties invited to take part. Notably however, the NGOs engaged for months in talks with the Polish Government and a loose coalition of Anti-ACTA protest organizers, jointly declined to come (translation).

Organised by the newly-established Ministry of Administration and Digitalization, the debate was unique both in length (overall over 7 hours straight) and in modes of participation — besides physical presence, a live audio/video stream was available and official electronic channels were announced: a Twitter hashtag (#debataACTA) and Chancellery's Facebook profile. The very fact of facilitating electronic communication got praised by the NGOs; the choice of channels, however, did not.

With the help of Telecomix an IRC channel was quickly set-up to create a more open, non-private and inclusive means. And, to much surprise, the Ministry and the Chancellery chose to include IRC both on the huge displays in the room the debate took place and in the official "Internet-submitted questions" time."

Submission + - ACTA protests continue; summary of situation in Po (

rysiek writes: "Few days ago, Poland (along with many other European countries) signed ACTA, which sparked paneuropean protests (map).

All this commotion started last week in Poland, after Polish NGOs shared the news about the date of signing. According to some estimates, about 1 million people protested against ACTA in all major (and many smaller) Polish cities during the last week. There finally is a comprehensive English summary (mirror) of what happened in Poland and where it stands for now."

Submission + - Anonymous DDoSed Polish government sites... not! (

rysiek writes: "Rumour has it Polish gov websites (including the Polish Parliament, or Sejm) have been DDoSed by Anonymous. This, however, does not seem to be the case (in English, courtesy of Google Translate). Apparently that info about the purported DDoSing/hacking of the sites caused people to swarm to them — creating a disorganized, impromptu DDoS look-alike."

Submission + - EU to sign ACTA on January 26, but not all lost ye (

rysiek writes: "On a meeting of the Polish Government officials with Polish NGOs and business representatives it was confirmed that European Union is poised to sign the Anti-Couterfeiting Trade Agreement as soon as January 26th. But not all is lost. The Treaty, then, needs to be ratified by the Europarliament and member states individually. Especially the Europarliament ratification vote is important, as it is an either-or vote — if not ratified there, ACTA gets rejected in its entirety (the member states ratification can at most cripple it).

The Ministry of Administration and Digitization is not amused and has asked the Prime Minister (who promised this May to hold ACTA adoption process until the kinks are worked out) to cancel the signing authorization for the time being.

I can haz ACTA-blackout nao? March date for such an idea is being tossed around in Polish NGO community."

Submission + - Poland goes Open (

rysiek writes: "In a surprise announcement Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk declared new policy toward more open state: ''All information funded from public sources should be available as public property, free for everyone to use it as they wish'' said Tusk last week during a meeting with NGO leaders in Poland (translation). This is very unusual in Europe, and in fact puts Poland ahead of other EU states. A loose web of polish NGOs for more than 2 years advocated more open public information laws. A bill to that effect will now be presented in Sejm (Polish parliament)."

Submission + - After Startup Weekend Warsaw ( 1

rysiek writes: "Last weekend marked the first Startup Weekend in Poland. Three days, about 100 developers and designers, 20 mentors, forming 30+ teams. The big winner — — will be launching soon, with a few others close on its heels. Most hackteresting project — Nest of Worlds (conceived by the Warsaw Hackerspace people) — has it all: Game of Life on hexes, with sound in pure JS (needs Firefox 4, but still awesome). There is also a lengthy summary of the network setup and problems for the network admins among you. Ralph Talmont also offers a more general write-up. Discplaimer: I was the network guy."

"When it comes to humility, I'm the greatest." -- Bullwinkle Moose