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Comment: Re:G+ users like the games just the way they are.. (Score 1) 75

by rpetre (#37295328) Attached to: What Google+ Games Needs To Beat Facebook

Same here. I am apalled that this criticism doesn't feature more frequently in G+ games reviews. Having 3rd party developers have full information about my account and contacts was the main reason I ditched my FB account. I'd be okay if some features required extra permissions (like friends leaderoboard and so on), I'd even be willing to show the game a particular circle of friends, but not like this.

This and the "identity service, not social networking" thing are the two major letdowns from this service. And I think i can imagine the tsunami of cash pushing on the other side, so my hopes are really low.

"Do no evil" my foot.

Books

+ - Why don't we buy sysadmin books anymore? -> 4

Submitted by Bandman
Bandman (86149) writes "Our needs for good information and documentation have not changed, but the way that we get it has. The ebook revolution has made physical shelves of sysadmin books endangered species. A bigger issue may be that even ebook sales of books related to system administration have not been selling. Somewhere along the line, people stopped buying things like "DNS and Bind" or "Sed & Awk".

Has our need for documentation changed, or just our sources of it?"

Link to Original Source

+ - XenClient: User Review->

Submitted by Bandman
Bandman (86149) writes "Last week was Synergy, and annual product annoucement / cheerleading session from Citrix. At Synergy, Citrix announced XenClient, the next logical step in the progression of desktop virtualization, namely a bare metal hypervisor designed to run on end-user laptops.

Blogger Matt Simmons grabbed a spare laptop and spent some time playing. He shared his thoughts (and pictures) of the process."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Not if they were on usenet (Score 1) 114

by rpetre (#32227492) Attached to: Judicial Nominations In the Internet Age

Some of the stuff, yes. All of the stuff? Next to impossible.

I've been online "only" for about 13 years. Most of these years I posted on the mailing lists of a local Linux community. In time I ended up the administrator of the services and mailing lists, and I've tried for years to gather a complete archive of all the emails, a task that has so far proven impossible ( a couple of server crashes and upgrades, nobody with such an extensive personal email archive, so on). Bits and pieces are still there (one of the lists was archived on mail-archive.com for a while, other things have been cross-posted, so on).

So yeah, there are a lot of stupid (and some smart) things that I said out there, but I'm absolutely positive I can't gather everything, as much as I'd try.

Image

Food Activist's Life Becomes The Life of Brian 165

Posted by samzenpus
from the you-are-all-individuals dept.
krou writes "After food activist and author Raj Patel appeared on The Colbert Report to promote his latest book, things seemed to be going well, until he began to get inundated with emails asking if he was 'the world teacher.' In events ripped straight from The Life of Brian, it would seem that Raj Patel's life story ticks all the boxes necessary to fulfill prophecies made by Benjamin Creme, founder of religious sect Share International. After the volume of emails and inquiries got worse, Patel eventually wrote a message on his website stating categorically that he was not the Messiah. Sure enough, 'his denial merely fanned the flames for some believers. In a twist ripped straight from the script of the comedy classic, they said that this disavowal, too, had been prophesied.'"

+ - DevOps: Sysadmin meet Developer and Vice-Versa-> 1

Submitted by socialized
socialized (1258014) writes "DevOps, also referred to as agile systems administration, is a big part of how Kris Buytaert, a Senior Linux and Open Source Consultant with the Belgian firm Inuits who, likes to create opens source apps for business. Buytaert describes himself as a developer who "then became an Op" and as such, began to see the challenges facing both sides of the application deployment process. The 451 Group also has recently noted this phenomenon as have may others (Stephen Nelson-Smith, Jake Sorofman) .There's even a series of Devops Days internationally and OpsCamp is running DevOps styleunconferences for cloud computing (Devops.Info lists even more self-organizing conferences). How many systems administrators consider themselves part developers and how many developers consider their operations knowledge a critical to their ability to create software?"
Link to Original Source
Image

NHS Should Stop Funding Homeopathy, Says Parliamentary Committee 507

Posted by samzenpus
from the how-am-I-going-to-align-my-chakras-now dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Homeopathic remedies work no better than placebos, and so should no longer be paid for by the UK National Health Service, a committee of British members of parliament has concluded. In preparing its report, the committee, which scrutinizes the evidence behind government policies, took evidence from scientists and homeopaths, and reviewed numerous reports and scientific investigations into homeopathy. It found no evidence that such treatments work beyond providing a placebo effect." Updated 201025 19:40 GMT by timothy: This recommendation has some people up in arms.
Power

Creating Electric Power From Light Using Gold Nanoparticles 77

Posted by Soulskill
from the nanite-power-supply dept.
cyberfringe writes "Professor of Materials Science Dawn Bonnell and colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania have discovered a way to turn optical radiation into electrical current that could lead to self-powering molecular circuits and efficient data storage. They create surface plasmons that ride the surface of gold nanoparticles on a glass substrate. Surface plasmons were found to increase the efficiency of current production by a factor of four to 20, and with many independent parameters to optimize, enhancement factors could reach into the thousands. 'If the efficiency of the system could be scaled up without any additional, unforeseen limitations, we could conceivably manufacture a 1A, 1V sample the diameter of a human hair and an inch long,' Prof. Bonnell explained. The academic paper was published in the current issue of ACS Nano. (Abstract available for free.) The significance? This may allow the creation of nano-sized circuits that can power themselves through sunlight (or another directed light source). Delivery of power to nanodevices is one of the big challenges in the field."

Comment: Re:Screw PHP, I write everything in C (Score 3, Informative) 295

by rpetre (#30971046) Attached to: Facebook Rewrites PHP Runtime For Speed
I'd like to point out that long before xkcd there was userfriendly, and that in my circle we still like to and this sort of joke by saying "magnets" and giggle. The "Edward Lorenz, the butterfly and the chaos theory" punchline seems a bit forced (unless you go for the 'M-x butterfly' twist to make the emacs guy get the attention ;) )

Comment: Re:Physics of computing the universe (Score 1) 269

by rpetre (#30931902) Attached to: Can Curiosity Be Programmed?
Actually a mirror doesn't add any information, it just reflects photons :) So even for perfect parallel mirrors, at best you'll be able to trap photons that move perfectly perpendicular to them (and keep for a finite period of time others which are close). IMO the only possible perfect simulation of the Universe that would be contained in it is the Universe itself, anything other would have less entropy by definition so it won't be a perfect simulation. Going to RTFA now, because the first part actually seems to be interesting.

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