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Comment: Re:What about taxation? (Score 3, Insightful) 85

On the other hand chargebacks are not that prolific for honest sellers. I've used two in my life and both for cheats.

I used to work for a small retail chain (75 stores) working specifically on the POS system (including CC processing). Chargebacks are a huge issue.

Our staff had to deal with 30-40 chargebacks a month during our busy times. Each of those required at least an hour of research on the transaction, filling out forms and then getting the information back to the credit card processing company. All of which typically resulted in money coming out of our account, even though the customer was in the wrong (Along with other things, we sold monthly subscriptions to our service. A customer would dispute charges because they went to a store that started with the same first 4 letters of our name and didn't recognize the charge.).

Chargebacks cost us 1 employees time for an entire week every single month, and we where an honest retailer (refunds for anything even have way reasonable).

Comment: Re:Stop Parroting Cardiography (Score 1) 149

EXACTLY

And to top it off, there is already a service for high priority traffic. It's called: Guaranteed bandwidth and QoS.
So long as both ends agree on which packets get delivered first, this is already a widely deployed (and acceptable) practice. An internet "fast lane" is not a solution to the heart monitor "problem".

Comment: Re:And what's Google *promising*? (Score 2) 129

by Michael Casavant (#46817483) Attached to: AT&T's Gigabit Smokescreen

Oh, yeah, this:

In February 2014, Google announced it had "invited cities in nine metro areas around the U.S.—34 cities altogether—to work with us to explore what it would take to bring them Google Fiber."

One shallow, useless promise begets another...

[fanboi]But, Google!!![/fanboi]

Ummm....
You say "One shallow, useless promise begets another..." but there simply isn't a promise in your quote.

Comment: Re:Give Bill a break... (Score 1) 220

by Michael Casavant (#46542483) Attached to: How Did Bill Nye Become the Science Guy?
And now he's one of the biggest advocates for science and technology in the country (CEO of the Planetary Society), of which there are far too few. Remember people, you are not born a scientist, actor or comedian. These are things learned over time. Plenty of people switch jobs when they find something more enjoyable. Bill Nye happens to be in a position where he supports science and has influence because of his past roles.

I, for one, applaud his effort to bring science to the masses. One doesn't have to be doing science research to make a difference.

Comment: Re:The US is broke for these kinds of projects (Score 3, Informative) 216

by Michael Casavant (#46418087) Attached to: NASA Wants To Go To Europa

This is like taking a vacation to the big ball of twine vs Disney Land because you can't afford it.

That is a terrible analogy. By comparing space exploration to vacation you are suggesting that the science has no value other than to satisfy someone's curiosity, which is simply not true.

A better analogy: Going to Europa is like a manufacturing company investing in a robotic production machine. It costs a lot and takes a considerable amount of skill to setup and use, but once it's going the payoff is enormous.

We should be taking money from other things and putting them into the space program. We need these investments. See: http://www.investopedia.com/fi...

Money can't buy happiness, but it can make you awfully comfortable while you're being miserable. -- C.B. Luce

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