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Comment Re:speaking as an engineer, it happens. (Score 2) 323

Linus remains the sole gatekeeper for what goes or doesn't go in the kernel

He isn't.

You're free to release your kernel with whatever patches you want to approve or reject just as much as Linus can.

In fact - just about every major distro works that way - applying not necessarily the exact same set of patches that Linus does.

Of course many people trust Linus, so most distros follow him pretty closely.

But that's because people trust him - not that he's some magical "Gatekeeper".

Comment Re:It's going to be painful... (Score 5, Insightful) 176

MBA's took over too fast at Yahoo after the founders took their money and ran...

Even a bit worse than that --- after they watched AOL buy Time Warner they wanted to emulate that they hired some Warner Brothers guy as their CEO who didn't know much about the internet. And they never invest in the technologies they have. Consider all the times they aquired the leading company in a space --- only to *not* invest in it and kill it:

  • - that Yahoo bought for ~$4 billion - was the leading audio/video site of its time, and could have been Youtube + Hulu + Netflix
  • - that Yahoo bought for ~3 billion - was the leading social network of its time - could have been MySpace+Facebook
  • Egroups - for a half a billion - another social network component.
  • - another social network component
  • Altavista as part of Overture - that Yahoo bought for i-forget-how-much - was the leading search engine of it's time - and yahoo doesn't even use them, preferring to pay competitors for search results.
  • MusicMatch - that coulda been Pandora.

And such irony that they *now* descide to focus on Search --- after having bought what was once the best search engine on the internet (AltaVista), yet have since then been paying competitors to do search for them.

Comment Re:Answer (Score 4, Funny) 336

unique_ptr ... shared_ptr

LOL at how C++ gets new smart pointers every couple years.

It's like they're trolling their own users with their:

  • classes are kinda like structs, so you can use 'typedef struct ... *' for classes and 'void *' for generic functions (Everything from CFront in 83 through ARM in 99)
  • no! 'void *' pointers are broken! use 'auto_ptr' instead (C++03)
  • no! 'auto_ptr' is broken! use 'shared_ptr' instead (C++07/TR1)
  • no! 'shared_ptr' is broken!(for most use cases) use
  • 'boost::scoped_ptr' instead (non-standard, but more useful than the standard's shared_ptr)
  • no! 'boost::scoped_ptr' is broken! use 'std::unique_ptr const' instead (C++11)
  • no! 'std::unique_ptr const' is fugly! use "auto" and hope C++14's "return type deduction" will guess a safe type and hope C++17's "new rules for auto deduction" won't break stuff (C++14)


How the heck can people take an "object oriented" language seriously when it takes literally 30 years (1983 to 2014) for them to come up with a non broken way of making a reference to an object....

... and in the end they give it a syntax like "std::unique_ptr const".


Comment Re:bye (Score 1) 531

something leaner and meaner, focused militantly on privacy and even going so far as to deliberately not support portions of HTML5 (e.g. DRM).

Pretty close to what Chromium is.

It stripped AAC, Flash, and other patent-encumbered parts.

I had hope for the dillo minimal browser, but not supporting javascript is getting pretty tough with many websites these days. Also hopeful that IceWeasel becomes the sane alternative if the Mozilla guys go crazy like this.

Comment And: of which communication types (Score 5, Insightful) 142

Also -- why the focus on a tiny subset (just Metadata) of a dying communiation system (phone).

It'd be far more interesting if they'd do something about far more invasive (not just metadata, but content too) that's being captured from (presumably) all internet traffic (skype, email, etc).

It's not so hard to lift yourself by your bootstraps once you're off the ground. -- Daniel B. Luten