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Comment: Re:Why is this funny? (Score 1) 262

by rolando2424 (#35078550) Attached to: What’s the Internet? (on 1994's Today Show)

"What do you mean you had to type things out? With your fingers? Why didn't you just use thought-2-computer tech?"

Marty McFly: [showing the two boys how to play the shoot 'em up video game] I'll show you, kid. I'm a crack shot at this.
[shoots a perfect score with the electronic gun]
Video Game Boy #1: You mean you have to use your hands?
Video Game Boy #2: That's like a baby's toy!
-- Back to the Future Part II

Comment: Windows key = Extra mod key (Score 2) 332

by rolando2424 (#34784772) Attached to: Will Touch Screens Kill the Keyboard?

What exactly IS that windows key for?

I don't know about Windows or Mac, but in Linux you can configure the windows key to be a extra mod key, kinda like Shift and Alt.

A lot of keyboard oriented windows managers (which I personally enjoy using) require that you press a certain key to activate the window manager's commands.
For example, Ctrl-t on Ratpoison or StumpWM or the Alt key on Xmonad. In those cases, you can use the windows key instead of those.

Or you can just learn emacs and start complaining that you need MORE keys on the keyboard

Security

+ - Death sentence in Chinese anti-virus bribery case-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A high-up Chinese government official, who took over 2 million dollars in bribes, has been given a suspended death sentence in a case which shows the bitter rivalry between rival anti-virus firms in the country.

Yu Bing, a former director of Internet monitoring department of the Ministry of Public Security, is said to have received bribes from a number of firms including 4.2 million yuan ($630,000) from leading Chinese anti-virus firm Rising. His firm sent out public warnings about malware, telling users to install Rising's product.

According to media reports, Yu pleaded guilty earlier this year to all charges of bribery charges and also fabricating evidence to frame Tian Yakui, a Vice President at Chinese anti-virus firm Micropoint, who used to work for Rising.

Tian spent 11 months in prison on the charges, before being released without charge, and his company said it lost over 30 million yuan (US$4.39 million) as a result of the action.

Micropoint is reported to be planning to launch a lawsuit seeking compensation for losses caused by the defamation. In the past, Rising has denied claims that it framed its competitor."

Link to Original Source

+ - Sir Maurice Wilkes, early programming pioneer dies-> 1

Submitted by EricTheRed
EricTheRed (5613) writes "Sir Maurice Wilkes — one of the early programming pioneers of the 1940's has died.

The National Museum Of Computing based at Bletchley Park announced on their twitter feed earlier:
http://twitter.com/#!/tnmoc/status/9283716039843841

Sad news that today Sir Maurice Wilkes passed away, aged 97. Here he was on a visit last year to #TNMOC http://ow.ly/3gUD2

from the article covering his visit to TNMON last year:

Born in 1913, Sir Maurice has been at the forefront of many post-1945 computing developments and even today, at the age of 96, maintains a keen interest and is an avid user of email and the Internet. Sir Maurice’s contributions to computing history have included the development of EDSAC, the first practical stored program computer begun in 1946, and co-authoring the first book on computer programming in 1951. His proposals for micro-programming have been widely adopted in the industry and in 1965 he published the first paper on cache memories. A co-designer, in the late 1970s, of the Cambridge Ring, a pioneering client-server system, Sir Maurice went on to work in industry on both sides of the Atlantic and in 2002 returned to the Computer Laboratory in Cambridge where he is an emeritus professor."

Link to Original Source

Comment: ls history (Score 3, Informative) 136

by rolando2424 (#33835276) Attached to: Software Evolution Storylines, Inspired By XKCD

According to this there are 5 files that start with "ls".

Except for ls.c, all those files have only one entry on their history. The "initial revision" on 1993-06-16.

On the other hand, you can check the history of ls by yourself. Ignoring a "build" commit done on 2010-09-18 (and by the same guy who did the "initial revision" ones), the last commit is from 2010-07-01 with the message header of "ls: use the POSIX date style when the locale does not specify one".

While not extremely important, it does show that ls keeps receiving updates to this day.

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