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Comment: Re:Not only that (Score 1) 648

by rob_benson (#35734202) Attached to: Bashing MS 'Like Kicking a Puppy,' Says Jim Zemlin

Not holding my breath. It's not that I don't have faith in the samba folks, but rather I accept that the company that BUILT the desktop might have the drop on server implementations necessary to manage said desktop.

Having a cause is nice, but then after you've fought for a couple years shoehorning your "kinda" products in to production, complete with their own unique and troublesome glitches, you begin to understand that the "Evil Software Company" may actually know a thing or two about their own desktop software. You stop wanting to fight problems for hours on end. You simply expect things to "just work", and to keep "just work"ing until something changes.

See, in IT administration, when you grow up you figure out that IT is less about tinkering with fun bits of tech, and more about making each dollar spent on IT return value to the company.

Now get off my lawn.

Funny, this is why I CHOOSE

Not holding my breath. It's not that I don't have faith in the samba folks, but rather I accept that the company that BUILT the desktop might have the drop on server implementations necessary to manage said desktop.

Having a cause is nice, but then after you've fought for a couple years shoehorning your "kinda" products in to production, complete with their own unique and troublesome glitches, you begin to understand that the "Evil Software Company" may actually know a thing or two about their own desktop software. You stop wanting to fight problems for hours on end. You simply expect things to "just work", and to keep "just work"ing until something changes.

See, in IT administration, when you grow up you figure out that IT is less about tinkering with fun bits of tech, and more about making each dollar spent on IT return value to the company.

Now get off my lawn.

Not holding my breath. It's not that I don't have faith in the samba folks, but rather I accept that the company that BUILT the desktop might have the drop on server implementations necessary to manage said desktop.

Having a cause is nice, but then after you've fought for a couple years shoehorning your "kinda" products in to production, complete with their own unique and troublesome glitches, you begin to understand that the "Evil Software Company" may actually know a thing or two about their own desktop software. You stop wanting to fight problems for hours on end. You simply expect things to "just work", and to keep "just work"ing until something changes.

See, in IT administration, when you grow up you figure out that IT is less about tinkering with fun bits of tech, and more about making each dollar spent on IT return value to the company.

Now get off my lawn.

...funny, that is EXACTLY why as an administrator I use Linux. I build a server,... And it keeps running.... 24/7..

Image

German Kindergartens Ordered To Pay Copyright For Songs 291

Posted by samzenpus
from the easy-as-taking-music-from-a-baby dept.
BBird writes "Deutsche Welle reports: 'Up until this year, preschools could teach and produce any kind of song they wanted. But now they have to pay for a license if they want children to sing certain songs. A tightening of copyright rules means kindergartens now have to pay fees to Germany's music licensing agency, GEMA, to use songs that they reproduce and perform. The organization has begun notifying creches and other daycare facilities that if they reproduce music to be sung or performed, they must pay for a license.'"

Comment: Re:I love Ubuntu... (Score 1) 871

by rob_benson (#27711443) Attached to: Ubuntu 9.04 Is As Slick As Win7, Mac OS X

I have it on both my laptops, and even installed it on a virtual machine on my work Mac.

BUT... I won't be recommending it to friends and family until they get the damn sound working immediately upon installation. If people can't use Flash and watch Youtube on it, it might as well be green letters on a black background.

Ummm, last time I installed Vista I couldn't even view a .pdf right from a base install, let alone Flash. What Koolaid ya drinkin' there Sparky?

Comment: Re:Deep Inspection is not the Problem (Score 2, Insightful) 126

by rob_benson (#27498849) Attached to: An Education In Deep Packet Inspection
I use it for worm control and attack detection on a corporate network: nothing wrong with that at all. It is completely untrue that the only application of DI is for spying or nefarious activity. Its like blaming bit torrent protocol for piracy. Again, it is use of the tool that is the problem.

Comment: Re:Simplification (Score 1) 283

by rob_benson (#26348023) Attached to: Why Game Developers Should Support OS X and Linux

1) That is true, but it is also pretty close to the average. 5% is not a currently accepted figure, that info is quite old. Many of the market figures utilize only US sales data. Computers are a world wide market. Apple has a 8-10% share of that market. I don't know what the next couple years will bring, but I am guessing on around 15% - 20% market within 2 years (depending on the effect of Windows 7). I think 15% is the more likely number.

2) Also true, and I mostly agree. This is why I think investigating it is worth time. Alot of these companies have been burned by supporting the Mac platform in the past, and need to test the waters before supporting Mac. I am not a "typical" Mac user, so my purchase habits may not match the norm. I have noticed a shareware/electronic delivery preference among Mac users whereas Windows users seem to prefer a boxed product. This may lead to sluggish sales of Mac software from the Brick-and-Mortor gang. It may well be that these products just plain dont sell on the platform.

3) I will stand by the opinion that demographically Mac users tend to be a bit more affluent. If you can afford a new Prius you generally do not purchase a Ford Focus. I don't really think performance is a huge concern to most users as long as the system responds adequately. Price is probably the 1 out of 3 objection to Mac. This is because the price is expensive for alot of folks, they are not generally doing a cost/performance analysis. I agree that Mac plays the status/image game, no argument there.

Comment: Re:Simplification (Score 1) 283

by rob_benson (#26339891) Attached to: Why Game Developers Should Support OS X and Linux
Your simplification numbers are too simple. You are cutting the Mac numbers basically in half: http://marketshare.hitslink.com/report.aspx?qprid=11 Win: XP: 65.22% Vista: 21.12% 2000: 1.47% ttl: 88% est Mac: Intel-Based: 7.19% Legacy: 2.44% ttl: 10% It seems to me that a 10% possible gain is well worth going after - Don't you wish YOUR income went up 10%? Note also that those who buy expensive (Over $1000) computers are currently more likely to buy a Mac than a PC: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-9947501-37.html I'm thinking entering a market with more high-income users would be a good move for any company. That said, there are no guarantees, but it certainly a good market to look into.

Comment: Re:so? (Score 1) 369

by rob_benson (#25727739) Attached to: Windows 7 Benchmarks Show Little Improvement On Vista
Points:
1) Hardcore gaming is not a concern of the majority of Windows users (and XP outperforms Vista there anyway). Linux has plenty of games (and at least in Ubuntu they are MUCH easier to install and do not have confusing and arbitrary DRM restrictions) for "casual" gamers, which the majority of Windows users are. The hardcore folks I will admit need Windows.
2) In Ubuntu I don't download drivers, It configures that for me automatically in 90% of the systems I installed it in (well over 50 systems - admittedly that last 10% really sucked).
3) I run MS Office and Outlook using Crossover. I really don't need to since I have never had problems using Open Office. We use Exchange 2007 sooo. I have to run Outlook + I actually like MS Office.
4) Ummm I think you better fact check. In business Linux is highly respected. Almost everyone and their mother is MS certified. I am as well, But I can also support Linux. This makes my skill set more desirable than a MS only admin: I can provide a much wider solution set to projects that may require interoperability or have small budgets with large requirements. Linux is good for business - and it is installed on appprox. 1 in 4 new servers. LINK: http://news.cnet.com/IDC-Linux-server-sales-to-hit-9.1-billion-in-2008/2100-1010_3-5479681.html
I think Linux will continue make inroads as long as Microsoft continues down the road of "bigger is better" and continues to annoy users with registration nightmares and empty marketing ploys. Business-wise, the Server 2008 platform has some great features,and certainly is very competitive but their home market will continue to lose ground to OSX and Ubuntu if they don't start improving the average user's experience.

Wasn't there something about a PASCAL programmer knowing the value of everything and the Wirth of nothing?

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