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Submission Porsche chooses Apple over Google because Google wants too much data->

countach44 writes: As reported in number 5 of this list from Motor Trend, Porsche went with Apple over Google for the infotainment system in its new 911. Apparently, Android Auto wants vehicle data (throttle position, speed, coolant temp, etc...) whereas Apple Play only needs to know if the car is in motion. Speculation is around what Google, as a company building its own car, wants that data for.
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Submission Europe's highest court just rejected the US's 'safe harbor' agreement->

craigtp writes: The European Court of Justice has just ruled that the transatlantic Safe Harbour agreement, which lets American companies use a single standard for consumer privacy and data storage in both the US and Europe, is invalid.

The ruling came after Edward Snowden's NSA leaks showed that European data stored by US companies was not safe from surveillance that would be illegal in Europe.

This ruling could have profound effects on all US based companies, not just tech companies, that rely upon the "safe harbor" agreement to allow them to store their European customers' data in the US.

Under this new ruling, they could effectively be forced to store European customers' data in Europe and then have to follow 20 or more different sets of national data privacy regulations.

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Submission EU Court Invalidates Europe-US Safe Harbour Data Sharing Agreement

Mickeycaskill writes: The top court of the European Union on Tuesday has suspended an agreement that has allowed data-sharing between the EU and the US for the past 15 years, following months of increased tensions over spying and the protection of personal data.

The ruling was the court’s final decision in a data-protection case brought by 27-year-old Austrian law student Max Schrems against the Irish data protection commissioner. Schrems was concerned his data on Facebook could be shared with US intelligence.

The court declared that Safe Harbour deal was “invalid” as it takes data on European citizens outside the protection of European authorities. The deal was originally intended to facilitate data-transfers to the US, a country whose data-protection regime is less stringent than that of the EU.

Safe Harbour has been enforced since 2000, but has been reviewed since 2013 following Edward Snowden's relevations about mass surveillance. A new agreement on a new deal is thought to be close, but the invalidation of the current agreement, in place since 2000, is likely to create difficulties for many trans-Atlantic companies in the short term.

Comment I think that cookie-cutter approaches are useless, (Score 1) 718

not just for the question of how a contributor should be treated, but also for the question of how a leader should act.

If a leader is able to get world-beating results by being an asshole, then so be it. That leader has beaten the world, and I am not going to quibble with success. If a leader is an asshole and subpar output is the result, then by all means, tell them to treat their team differently.

Team dynamics are a complicated thing. You just don't fuck with a winning team. If they are using four letter words all the time and sacrificing live chickens at midnight, but the results are running circles around everyone else, I for one do not want them to stop, even if it would save a chicken's life.

At the same time, if they are doing all of these things and the results are uneven or poor, then by all means, change the behavior.

In this case, I'd say that the results of Linux kernel development speak for themselves. And if you just don't belong in the culture, then go somewhere else. If the culture starts to be counterproductive, give the world a great, big "I told you so!" and collect your profits on the book deal. But otherwise, to expect people to fuck up a successful operation for your feelings, for manners, or for high-minded ethics concerns is just bad juju. It's not lawyering or doctoring, ethical concerns are not front and center. It's software. The goal is that it works and works well, and in fact that's the highest ethical aspiration *of* software, given the many critical ways in which it gets used in today's world.

The value to the users is first. The comfort of the developers is second. If the culture and development process are working well, get the hell out of the way if you don't like them. As this person has done. So—problem solved.

Submission Humans Are More Toxic to Wildlife than Chernobyl->

derekmead writes: The Chernobyl disaster remains the worst nuclear accident in human history, with a death toll that is difficult to tally even decades later. Given the sobering reach of the resulting radiation contamination, you might expect the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone—the 4,200 square kilometers in the immediate vicinity of the explosion—to have suffered serious long-term ecological damage.

Surprisingly, though, a study published today in Current Biology shows that wildlife in the exclusion zone is actually more abundant than it was before the disaster. According to the authors, led by Portsmouth University professor of environmental science Jim Smith, the recovery is due to the removal of the single biggest pressure on wildlife—humans.

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Comment Re:Stronger IP protections (Score 2) 249

I'll put it to you like this - with stronger and longer recent IP protections recently, have you noticed a decrease or an increase in creative output?

"Creative output"? No change whatsoever.

Indie authors and musicians are not "sharply on the rise". There's just a new word, "indie", invented to make it seem like it was something that didn't happen until millennials invented "being creative while making hardly any money". And to think that stronger and longer IP protections is the reason behind the rise of indie artists is just dumb. Do you really believe some kid making music with ProTools in his bedroom cares about whether or not his grandchildren are going to share in the profits?

The people who say "stronger and longer IP protections is good for creativity" are almost universally people who have never done anything creative.

Comment Re:In favor (Score 1) 249

While I appreciate patriotism, I personally feel that we should be trying to make life better for humanity in general, rather than greedily holding onto wealth in the USA.

So write a check.

Taking at face value the Wharton study quoted above

A business school thinks what's good for corporations is good for humanity? What a surprise.

Coming back to TPP, it has some leaked aspects that I think are truly terrible, such as the intellectual freedom troubles. Those criticisms I consider reasonable, and I can appreciate why that would cause an informed and intelligent person to oppose the TPP. On the other hand, a kind of knee-jerk hatred to trade agreements in general appears to drive much of the opposition, and I think of those anti-trade arguments as having no moral standing, just like the ones put forth by the sugar lobby.

That's like saying, "I can appreciate people being against cancer, but I just do not understand the opposition to disease in general."

Comment Re:The odds are very low... (Score 1) 167

How about saving 450M off military spending right now and do the damn Asteroid Research with it? Just sayin'.
450M can be saved by having each American donate 1.5 dollars once to research. One less cheap beer this month would pretty much cover it for two people.

Comment Re:RISK vs CHANCE (Score 1) 167

Let's see:
- Global Warming: High chance, high risk, slow action. Will happen over generations (5+).
- Killer viruses (I assume you added bacteria as well): Low chance, low risk, slow or fast action. I'd bump it down significantly.
- Rogue black holes: frankly they fall into the same category as asteroids (celestials dangerous to us)
- Rogue artificial intelligence: Pah-lease. That's coming after global warming takes care of all of us :)
- Aliens: I'd lump them into "celestials dangerous to us".
- Gamma Ray Bursts: Low chance, extreme risk, unknown probability and no way to avoid. I'd plaster the "shit happens" tag on it and pray shit doesn't happen. It's the most we can do.
- Giant solar flares: Medium chance, medium risk, no way to avoid. See "Gamma Ray Bursts".
- Magnetic field reversal: "Still, there is no evidence that a weakened magnetic field would result in a doomsday for Earth. During past polarity flips there were no mass extinctions or evidence of radiation damage." (source: http://www.scientificamerican....). High chance, low risk, it's not a Mass Extinction Event. Also, we can do nothing about it.
- Supervolcanoes: Medium chance (it WILL happen), high risk, fast action. If the year without a summer tells us something, it tells us it would be bad. Bumped up, deserves funding.
- Biotech disaster: lumped together with Killer viruses.
- Nanotechnology: are we getting that far? Maybe. Deserves funding.
- Particle accelerator chain reaction: wasn't this scientifically dismantled many times over?
- Divine Intervention: "God Help Us All!" is all the funding this deserves.

Comment Re:Canada has already rejected it (Score 1) 249

Wrong. CPC acts for their Communist masters in China, not for Canada.

I see you have never grown up in Canada, and believe the non-translateable labels of "socialist" "communist" etc. Parties, other than the Greens, don't really translate to US versions. For example, in BC the Liberals are the most conservative party, and are run by the right of center Social Credit Party remnants.

I went to school (Capilano University, SFU, etc) with these people.

FORTUNE'S FUN FACTS TO KNOW AND TELL: A guinea pig is not from Guinea but a rodent from South America.