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Security

+ - 17% Smaller DES S-box Circuits Found-> 2

Submitted by
solardiz
solardiz writes "DES is still in use, brute-force key search remains the most effective attack on it, and it is an attractive building block for certain applications (the key size may be increased e.g. with 3DES). Openwall researchers, with funding from Rapid7, came up with 17% shorter Boolean expressions representing the DES S-boxes. Openwall's John the Ripper 1.7.8 tests over 20 million of combinations against DES-based crypt(3) per second on Core i7-2600K 3.4 GHz, which roughly corresponds to DES encryption speed of 33 Gbps."
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+ - Its official cell phones killing bees->

Submitted by
rossendryv
rossendryv writes "Scientists may have found the cause of the world’s sudden dwindling population of bees – and cell phones may be to blame. Research conducted in Lausanne, Switzerland has shown that the signal from cell phones not only confuses bees, but also may lead to their death. Over 83 experiments have yielded the same results. With virtually most of the population of the United States (and the rest of the world) owning cell phones, the impact has been greatly noticeable."
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Biotech

+ - 16 year old discovers cure for Cystic Fibrosis-> 1

Submitted by Bob the Super Hamste
Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) writes "According to yahoo new a 16 year old Canadian 11th grade student has discovered a possible cure for Cystic Fibrosis. The treatment is a drug combination that in a computer simulation on the Canadian SCINET supercomputing network appeared to cure the symptoms. He has also tested the drug combination on living cell with "results exceeded his expectations"."
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Open Source

+ - Yahoo Beats Patent Troll That Beat Google->

Submitted by
jfruhlinger
jfruhlinger writes "You may recall the saga of patent troll Bedrock, which claims that it has patents over Linux and successfully sued Google over Google's Linux use. Well, the verdict from Bedrock's suit against Yahoo on similar grounds has come in — and Yahoo is victorious, not least because Yahoo went second and got to see how the arguments in the Google case went."
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Idle

+ - IT pro pulls off rarest Putt-Putt feat->

Submitted by netbuzz
netbuzz (955038) writes "Rick Baird, a 53-year-old IT manager from North Carolina, recently accomplished a feat seen only twice in half a century and not once since 1979: a perfect round of Putt-Putt golf — 18 holes, 18 shots. He tells Network World: “When I got ready to play 18 everybody was still gathering around to watch. I had to back off once since people were moving and I did not want there to be any distractions, and I needed a deep breath to calm down.”"
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Security

+ - Openwall Linux 3.0: no SUIDs, anti log spoofing-> 2

Submitted by solardiz
solardiz (817136) writes "Openwall GNU/*/Linux (or Owl for short) version 3.0 is out, marking 10 years of the project. Owl is a small security-enhanced Linux distro for servers, appliances, and virtual appliances. Two curious properties of Owl 3.0: no SUID programs in default install (yet the system is usable, including password changing) and logging of who sends messages to syslog (thus, a user can't have a log message appear to come, say, from the kernel or sshd). No other distro has these. Other highlights of Owl 3.0: single live+install+source CD, i686 or x86_64, integrated OpenVZ (host and/or guest), "make iso" & "make vztemplate" in included build environment, ext4 by default, xz in tar/rpm/less, "anti-Debian" key blacklisting in OpenSSH. A full install is under 400 MB, and it can rebuild itself from source."
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Government

+ - Why Taking Photos in Public Places Is Not A Crime->

Submitted by longacre
longacre (1090157) writes "Blogger, lawyer and Popular Mechanics contributor Glenn Reynolds calls out the legally dubious practice of restricting photography in public places in the name of national security. From the article, "Legally, it's pretty much always okay to take photos in a public place as long as you're not physically interfering with traffic or police operations. As Bert Krages, an attorney who specializes in photography-related legal problems and wrote Legal Handbook for Photographers, says, "The general rule is that if something is in a public place, you're entitled to photograph it." What's more, though national-security laws are often invoked when quashing photographers, Krages explains that "the Patriot Act does not restrict photography; neither does the Homeland Security Act." But this doesn't stop people from interfering with photographers, even in settings that don't seem much like national-security zones.""
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Businesses

+ - The Good and Ugly Side Of GPL 1

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "Matt Mullenweg (the creator of wordpress open source blog software), after review by various legal experts, is sticking to his guns that themes and plugins that "extend" Wordpress violates the GPL if they are not themselves distributed under the GPL. Matt has gone so far as to post this on Twitter. Accoding to Matt, premium template called thesis should be under GPL and the owner is not happy about it. WordPress is willing to sue the maker of thesis theme for not following GPL licensing. The webmasters and thesis owners are also confused with new development. Mark Jaquith wrote an excellent technical analysis of why WordPress themes inherit the GPL. This is why even if Thesis hadn't copy and pasted large swathes of code from WordPress (and GPL plugins) its PHP would still need to be under the GPL. The Open Source / GPL vs Thesis debate continues further and some claims that Matt Mullenweg is anti-capitalist, the GPL is a communist ideology, and why users should moving away from WordPress."

+ - Dell ships infected motherboards->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes ""Computer maker Dell is warning that some of its server motherboards have been delivered to customers carrying an unwanted extra: computer malware. It could be confirmation that the "hardware trojans" long posited by some security experts are indeed a real threat.""
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AMD

+ - ARM blocked from server market, says analyst->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Despite a number of announcements in recent months that ARM and Marvell would be having a tilt at the server market, an analyst from Future Horizons gives them little hope of success. Big players like Google are solidly based on Intel, need 64-bit processing and will not migrate to ARM for legacy reasons, according to Mike Bryant, quoted here."
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Encryption

+ - TrueCrypt 7.0 Released->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The free open-source disk encryption software Truecrypt reached version 7.0. Among the new features are hardware-accelerated AES, support for devices that use sector sizes other than 512 bytes, ability to configure a volume to be automatically mounted whenever its host device gets connected to the computer, favorites organizer, and more. Downloads for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X are available here."
Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Can You Trust A Product Without Certification?->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "There are numerous organizations who, when looking for a new solution, will draw up a list of attributes products must have to proceed to the evaluation phase. FIPS accreditation, CAPS and CESG all appear regularly on this list of must haves, especially for government bodies. A product that doesn’t have accreditation does not automatically mean that it isn’t capable of achieving it. In fact, by its own admission, NIST states that FIPS accreditation should not solely be relied upon suggesting that even if a product is certified, it may not actually be secure."
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"The vast majority of successful major crimes against property are perpetrated by individuals abusing positions of trust." -- Lawrence Dalzell

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