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Journal Journal: National Vulnerability Database

" reports that The U.S. government has created a 'comprehensive database of computer vulnerabilities,' The National Vulnerability Database. Updated daily, it currently includes almost 12,000 vulnerabilities. Should be a boon to IT professionals and script kiddies alike."
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Journal Journal: Small USB-powered Linux server

"A small company from Utah (no, not that one) has announced the BlackDog USB-powered Linux server. It includes a fingerprint reader, a 400MHz PowerPC, 64MB of DRAM and 256MB or 512MB of flash and it runs Debian. The host PC sees it as a CD-ROM drive."'s+Realm+raises+a+fresh+%249+million&type=article&order=
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Journal Journal: Nikon digital camera with Wi-Fi support

"Nikon just revealed the world's first WiFi-enabled camera! It runs 802.11b/g and allows users to send files over a network. From the blurb: "Wireless shooting automatically transfers each picture to a selected computer as soon as it is shot. Pictures can then be viewed with Nikon's powerful yet fun-to-use and easy PictureProject software. And wireless printing delivers the convenience of cable-free direct printing to PictBridge-compatible printers. All these functions are easy to implement, too
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Journal Journal: Intel new security ideas

"Intel is developing a new technology that could prevent unauthorized access to wireless networks using the time it takes for packets to arrive from the access point to the Wi-Fi user. This is one of several ideas were presented at Intel Developer Forum. Intel has also released a hardware-based solution to fight against worm spreading. From the report: 'The system monitors the number of external connections being made and if a higher network activity is detected, the computer is disconnected to

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