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Comment: Re:270 mile range seems good (Score 1) 525

by rgarbacz (#42914199) Attached to: CNN Replicates John Broder's Drive In the Tesla Model S
Additionally to pump gas one need to dig tanks, permissions, certificates, etc., on the contrary to charge, ... well you need to be plugged to the power grid, and who is not.
So people can charge at the malls, coffee shops, work, homes, virtually anywhere they stop. There are even projects to charge at the stop lights via induction.
Most people for most of their life will never have to bother about visiting any special stations with just the today's technology of more then 200 miles range.

For me it is a game changer - no more spilled oil in the oceans, no more wars for oil, much less CO2 in the atmosphere - well almost, but at least much less, but anyway much better, not to mention the noise pollution. A dream world. If only ... the cars were not so expensive, but hopefully it will get better.

As for the review, well, we all know journalists have to make a living, controversial stories sells better, bla, bla bla, but there is a difference between facts interpretation, and a blatant lie, for me NYT is not a news source anymore, if I want entertainment I watch "The Daily Show".

Comment: used to like it ... till my books disappeared (Score 1) 465

by rgarbacz (#42496003) Attached to: Death of Printed Books May Have Been Exaggerated
I used to be a big fan of digital books, great convenience, until once the google book reader for iPad upgrade came and I was informed that my book is also on another device (I have a reader and an iPad), and the book disappeared. Sorry, but at this moment all the convenience was gone.

I am still a fan, but only not DRMed e-books, fortunately there is enough to read, and mostly much better, well if a book is still being read after a few hundred of years it means it is worth it.

Well it is pity, because I have time to read mainly when I travel, and there are books, which are worth reading, but could not have been written long time ago.

Comment: Re:Then buy NZ music (Score 1) 469

by rgarbacz (#40663921) Attached to: US "the Enemy" Says Dotcom Judge

If you buy music produced in the US you buy it under the terms of the license. Don't like those terms? Buy music produced elsewhere.

It is actually a very interesting comment. Tells a lot about the mentality, and explains much all the conflicts in the world we witness, kind of surprising assumption that certain laws, even though locally agreed, should be enforced all over the world.

In this case it is sort of like every product labeled US has a statue of a US embassy, ergo within its realm the only applicable law is the US one, which is (unfortunately for some, luckily for others) not the case - it is as simple as this, going to another country you are bound by the law of this country, unless you are an ambassador or an invader.

I always thought the the whole purpose of the law is to make lives easier, decent, and respected, well ideally, at least I would expect this from US "the best country in the world" as they say. It so happens that people do travel, not only from suburbs to downtown, but also from a continent to continent, also not just as tourists. Lets imagine someone lived in the US for a while, collected a nice set of DVDs, and then moved to another continent, with a different regional code. So do you want the person to keep multiple playing devices just to be able to use what he has paid for, or to abandon his collection?

Do not answer, it was a rhetorical question, I know the answer.

Comment: Re:It's not spin, it's Obama's personal priorities (Score 1) 450

by rgarbacz (#30953536) Attached to: Reported Obama Plan Would Privatize Manned Launches
With a few corrections:

Kennedy wanted a moon landing, and his successors honored his memory by following through.

The Moon landing had nothing to do with honoring Kennedy, it was about beating Russians, who had the first 'satellite', the first man orbit flight, and so on.

Bush II liked space and authorized new missions.

But he never gave money for this, it was just political talking.

That brings us down to Obama who is the first president in my memory to shut down a manned space project.

Not the first president to shut down a manned space project, but the first president since the space area with such a huge budget deficit.

incomplete efforts such as the Shuttle and some of the planetary probes

Shuttle has flows, no doubts, but it is also a manned space vehicle with many 'firsts', and also many 'only' (in a positive meaning). Also not 'some planetary probes' - most of what we (as human race) know about the Solar System, and the Universe is thanks to NASA space exploration. NASA has done a heck more than all the rest of the world together in robotic space exploration. I am not an American, but can honestly say it.

Some day, we will sit in our yards and watch them through our Chinese-made telescopes. Look, Dad, there's the China Station! There's the European Station! There goes another Russian moon shot! And we can look back on this pivotal time in our history when we turned our back on the future and technological leadership.

But there is also another scenario possible: one day, when in other countries only a highly selected few will see the dunes of the Moon, an average American can fly for his vacation to see the Apollo 11 landing site. What I mean is that there is not enough reasoning to say that shutting down the Ares program equals the end of the US manned space flight. AFAIK NASA does not produce anything, they order they hardware from the industry anyway.

Comment: Re:Sad news (Score 2, Insightful) 920

by rgarbacz (#30924426) Attached to: Obama Choosing NOT To Go To the Moon

Playing strategic games taught me, that focusing on domestic problems (only), made me always being conquered by barbarians sooner or later. ;-)

Human nature is to explore, also social life and responsibility for each other (despite what some claim, people are altruistic by nature, and it is proven). We are doomed to perish if we step up against either of them. They may seem to contradict, but they do not, except the need for resources, i.e. the golden center is always the best way.

Comment: Re:Looking for a fight in all the wrong places. (Score 1) 156

by rgarbacz (#30895598) Attached to: Chinese Human Rights Orgs Hit By DDoS
Possibly will be marked as a troll, but the level of hatred and misinformation about China surprises me. The cultural revolution is a history now, the only things which are left are one party ruling system and a separate government in Taiwan. Any Chinese can start his business and make a fortune, and many indeed did so, the president of China is elected every few years (except that only party members can vote). Architecture of many Chinese cities overshadows many western ones. They have the fastest train, they sent people into space, they can openly criticize their government, they enjoy western culture: music and movies, they are very humorous people, and they do love their country. There were bad things the government did, but I see change, and a big progress. And at the end, please try to reach the sources, learn the history, also the history of your own country, before you throw a stone.

Comment: Re:They need to (Score 1) 390

by rgarbacz (#30864594) Attached to: Judge Lowers Jammie Thomas' Damages to $54,000
A perfect example! Lets require them to show that they actually had lost income from the very songs during the period, i.e. before she uploaded them the income should be X higher from the very 24 songs (corrected with regard to the natural income curve from selling songs). I believe the records companies know which songs are selling, which are not. It should be very easy to show the loss of income form your hypothetical restaurant. This way a judge can decide about the reasonable penalty.

Comment: Re:NASA isn't good at listening (Score 2, Insightful) 319

by rgarbacz (#30863648) Attached to: Panel Warns NASA On Commercial Astronaut Transport
Space flights indeed are dangerous and for some time to come will remain in the domain of exploration rather than tourism, but your claim that NASA has no faults in the disasters which happened is not true. Space shuttle, although an awesome looking vehicle, is inherently not safe:
  • it is the only man space vehicle with heat shield not protected, where any foam isolation debrees (or any other object, which happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time) can easily damage it (all other vehicles are put on top of a rocket), if it followed proven concept Columbia accident would not happen
  • it is the only man space vehicle without launch escape system (all other vehicles have small rockets, which take the man capsule away from a rocked in case of any early flight failures), if it followed this basic safety guidelines the astronauts from Challenger most likely would survive the catastrophe (they were still alive after the explosion)

Comment: Re:Seriously? (Score 1) 926

by rgarbacz (#30670372) Attached to: Slovak Police Planted Explosives On Air Travelers

I hear this "argument" over and over again, but I wonder whether you considered in your calculations the number of people involved in road (or eating) vs air traffic daily, and that we have already had flight checks and restrictions. Of course freedom is important, but what kind of importance "freedom" to board a plane carrying whatever you wish has to die for? How about freedom to reach your destination, to see your family? I heard/read some people doubt the safety increase based on the screening, well, this is something we can argue about, but you literally say to give up any checks, because ... "one can die anyway is so many different ways"??? Are you really advising to give up any flight check in the name of "freedom"?

It is a curiosity for me that a post with such a frivolous statement, which is not supported by any scientific data was modded as +5 insightful. Indeed we are in the age of Aquarius, when feelings and believes overshadows reason.

Comment: Re:Continuum (Score 4, Insightful) 239

by Tellarin (#29959124) Attached to: EU Wants To Redefine "Closed" As "Nearly Open"

First of all, 'open' formats has nothing to do with source code.

Second, "open source" is not synonym with "free software" (like software that uses the GPL as license). This has nothing to do with the discussion. And open source does not even means giving work away for free. If somebody sells their code, it is open source, for example.

Creative commons is another example of "opening" stuff that is not code.

I agree that there is a continuum from completely closed to completely open, but any format demanded by governments should be open and non encumbered by patents or other licenses.

There is nothing stopping someone or some company form writing a proprietary piece of software to read/write some open format. But in many cases it is not possible to have a open/free/whatever version of a software to read/write some closed format. This causes an artificial restriction on access to the information made available in that format, what should be inadmissible in certain scenarios.

Why should someone need to license or buy a piece of software form specific companies to have access to government data? This is unacceptable.

Comment: Re:What's next? (Score 2, Informative) 645

by rgarbacz (#29835527) Attached to: Singer In Grocery Store Ordered To Pay Royalties
I would just add, that in most EU countries, one also pays royalties to the music industry buying any kind of storage (HDD, CD-R*/DVD-R*, or flash).

So My advice is to stop giving them excuse to lobby for more draconian law: do not copy illegally any content, use alternatives, use your voting power, also the money voting power. Fortunately we live in democracies, lets embrace it and use it, because slowly the law becomes insane. I moved to another DVD region, and now I cannot play my new and old movies on the same device. I cannot play movies on my computer (because the system I use is "too" user oriented). I cannot make a home movie and play it on a TV when using a computer with not too user oriented OS without HDMI. To see some movies during traveling I have to either buy another version, or carry all the DVDs I would potentially like to see. And all of these restrictions are not because of technology limits, not because I did not pay for the content, but because even though all the content I have is legal, I am still treated as a thief.

Comment: too much hunger for fame? (Score 1) 244

by rgarbacz (#29756875) Attached to: First Black Hole For Light Created On Earth

It is pity, that the wish for fame overshadows scientific correctness. Calling this "device" a black hole is like calling a bicycle a space shuttle, because both have wheels. If something is black in certain wavelength, does not mean it is a black-hole.

Not that it is not significant, it surely is, but it is more like a black microwave paint discovery.

The number of arguments is unimportant unless some of them are correct. -- Ralph Hartley

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