Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 31 declined, 3 accepted (34 total, 8.82% accepted)

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Submission + - Raymond Chen authored the Windows 3.1 Ctrl+Alt+Del Screen 1

rfernand79 writes: Raymond Chen has posted a rather amusing clarification as to the provenance of the Windows 3.1 Ctrl+alt+Del Screen. The screen was not authored by Steve Ballmer, as reported by various sites. It was authored by Raymond Chen. Amusingly, his original post was misrepresented in amusing ways, in a variety of news outlets.

+1 for the echo chamber.

Submission + - Scala: Next Steps (

rfernand79 writes: Infoworld has an interview with Martin Odersky, designer of Scala, in which they discuss the future of this popular language. Three versions are discussed as being part of the Scala roadmap: The first one (2.12) focuses on better integration with Java 8, and making use of the latest improvements in the JVM. The second one (Aida) focuses on cleaning up the Scala libraries. But the third one (Don Giovani) is about a fundamental rethink of Scala, with a strong focus on simplicity.

Submission + - Silverlight 2.0 released

rfernand79 writes: "Via Scoot Guthrie's Blog we find out that Silverlight 2.0 has been released. The blog post notes some interesting statistics, including the magnitude of video streamed during the Olympics and the Democratic National Convention (both using Silverlight). "Hello Worlds" and interesting links are included in the blog."

Submission + - More on Microsoft's PR strategy.

rfernand79 writes: A web ad pointing to this page on MSN, in addition to the recent clearification campaign and claims of Microsoft hiring people to boost their entries on Wikipedia has made me ask the following question to slashdot: What is good marketing in IT? I can see how Apple has a succesful marketing campaign encompassing the iPod nano (product) RED and their funny Get a Mac ads, but why are those strategies any better than Microsoft's? Most likely somebody out there thinks clearification is funnier than get a mac, or that product red is just a trendy "Bono" thing... still, why is Microsoft's image not improving?

Do not underestimate the value of print statements for debugging.