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Comment: Re:of course it wasn't NK (Score 1) 235

It would have been in some theaters, but not the two largest chains. The movie industry has a number of rules / conventions (some contractual) pertaining to theatrical releases, so Sony decided to try again later instead of just release in some theaters.

They easily could have released already via another distribution channel (such as their own streaming service, Crackle), but they are probably still hoping for a high-gross opening weekend in theaters, which they will no doubt get after all the publicity the film's received.

Anyway, I do wonder if the hackers just meant that the movie is so terrible, theater goers will want to blow themselves up.

Comment: Re:Not News (Score 1) 195

by reve_etrange (#48639413) Attached to: Quantum Physics Just Got Less Complicated

The quote I used comes at the conclusion of a mathematical demonstration - here's the link. I've now had the time to read the new paper (TFA), and they actually credit Feynman right at the start for having the general insight. Feynman's discussion is for a single uncertainty relation (position and momentum for a "particle" composed of a finite wave train), while TFA is broadly general and cached in terms of the modern entropy-based approached to uncertainty. So I think you're right, in that Feynman's treatment can't really be called a "framework" - it only deals with a single problem.

Really the only problem here is gross overstatement in TFS...but what else is new.

Comment: Re:Lame (Score 4, Informative) 195

by reve_etrange (#48637173) Attached to: Quantum Physics Just Got Less Complicated

Maybe you're thinking of The Feynman Lectures (which is college-level)? In Volume 3, Section 2-2 of his lectures, Feynman shows the deep relationship between the uncertainty principle and wave-particle duality. Feynman sez:

Now this property of waves, that the length of the wave train times the uncertainty of the wave number associated with it is at least 2, is a property that is known to everyone who studies them.

Comment: Re:Not News (Score 1) 195

by reve_etrange (#48637093) Attached to: Quantum Physics Just Got Less Complicated

the rigorous mathematical framework

Like the one shown in Volume 3, Section 2-2 of the Feynman Lectures of Physics, published 1964?

Now this property of waves, that the length of the wave train times the uncertainty of the wave number associated with it is at least 2, is a property that is known to everyone who studies them. It has nothing to do with quantum mechanics. It is simply that if we have a finite train, we cannot count the waves in it very precisely.

Comment: Re:Ethics? (Score 1) 552

by reve_etrange (#48636999) Attached to: FBI Confirms Open Investigation Into Gamergate

Parent wrote:

There's a big difference to a general attack on women because of their sex and criticisms towards specific women for their actions, which the anti-gamergate side refuses to acknowledge. The former may or may not be misogyny (depends on the motive for the generalization)

The "former" applies directly to the phrase "a general attack on women because of their sex" (emphasis mine). The elided part of the sentence has no bearing on this fact.

Criticizing someone who happens to be female for things that have nothing to do with her being a female could be misogyny, but is not guaranteed to be misogyny.

The parent specifically refers to a "attack on women because of their sex," which explicitly has to do with their being female. The parent doesn't say "criticizing...for things that have nothing to do with being female," it says "attacks...because of their [female] sex." Hope that clears things up for you.

Comment: Re:Automatic cars are just around the corner... (Score 1) 130

I guess the price goes a long way towards showing how much more impressive the computer vision approach would be, if it worked. A (stereoscopic) camera produces much less information than LIDAR, and visual tasks are always deceptively complex.

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