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Submission + - Ask Slashdot: How do I recover from doxxing?

An anonymous reader writes: I've been doxxed on a popular forum, by one of the moderators no less. The forum owner doesn't care, the hosting company doesn't care. I'm getting bombarded by email and social media, even via GitHub. How does a person recover from this? I don't want to create a whole new identity or shut down all my web sites, social media etc. Can't really change my real name either, at least not without an incredible amount of hassle. The police don't care, and since the forum owner is on the other side of the world it's unlikely there could be any legal consequences, and even if they were they would probably only draw more attention to me. I've tried to clean up Google's search results about me. How do I fix this? What does a fix even look like?

Submission + - White House Responds to Petition to Pardon Edward Snowden

protest_boy writes: The White House has issued a response to the two-year old petition to pardon Edward Snowden for any crimes that may have been committed in revealing secret NSA programs.

"If he [Snowden] felt his actions were consistent with civil disobedience, then he should do what those who have taken issue with their own government do: Challenge it, speak out, engage in a constructive act of protest, and — importantly — accept the consequences of his actions. He should come home to the United States, and be judged by a jury of his peers — not hide behind the cover of an authoritarian regime. Right now, he's running away from the consequences of his actions."

Submission + - Why doesn't our Solar System have a super-Earth?

StartsWithABang writes: In our own Solar System, there are the four gas giant worlds, the four inner rocky worlds, and then a bunch of icy and rocky bodies smaller than those. But in other solar systems, there’s a whole class of worlds in between the size of Earth and Neptune, called either super-Earths or mini-Neptunes. This class not only exists, but it’s the most common type of planet in the Universe, to the best of our knowledge. Here's why we think we don't have one (now), owing to the unique, migratory history of our own planets.

Submission + - Dropbox Moves Accounts Outside N. America to Ireland

monkeyzoo writes: Similar to a previous announcement by Twitter, Dropbox has changed its Terms of Service for users outside of North America (USA/Canada/Mexico) such that services will now be provided out of Ireland. Will other companies follow this trend and leave the USA (and the jurisdiction of the NSA)? Note, the announcement states that North American users are not able to opt into the Irish Terms of Service.

Submission + - When Customer Dissatisfaction Is a Tech Business Model (datamation.com)

jammag writes: A new trend has emerged where tech companies have realized that abusing users pays big. Examples include the highly publicized Comcast harassing service call, Facebook "experiments," Twitter timeline tinkering, rude Korean telecoms — tech is an area where the term "customer service" has an Orwellian slant. Isn't it time customer starting fleeing abusive tech outfits?

Submission + - YouTube Suspends Massive Archive of Information Security Conference Videos (pastebin.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Adrian Crenshaw, also known as Irongreek, is a regular face at Information Security conferences. He records many talks, processes them, and puts them online for all to learn from. His YouTube channel is one of the the largest archives of Information Security knowledge out there. In many cases, it's the only record of the research and knowledge presented at the small to medium sized security conferences in the United States. Tonight, Google decided to suspend his YouTube channel with no reason given. Our industry is reeling from this loss of collective knowledge. We ask if this is the beginning of censorship against security content? We hope not and we hope that Google will repeal its decision and bring back Irongeek's channel.

Submission + - Ampere could be redefined after experiments track single electrons crossing chip (nature.com)

ananyo writes: Physicists have tracked electrons crossing a semiconductor chip one at a time — an experiment that should at last enable a rational definition of the ampere, the unit of electrical current.
At present, an ampere is defined as the amount of charge flowing per second through two infinitely long wires one metre apart, such that the wires attract each other with a force of 2×107 newtons per metre of length. That definition, adopted in 1948 and based on a thought experiment that can at best be approximated in the laboratory, is clumsy — almost as much of an embarrassment as the definition of the kilogram, which relies on the fluctuating mass of a 125-year-old platinum-and-iridium cylinder stored at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures in Paris.
The new approach, described in a paper posted onto the arXiv server on 19 December, would redefine the amp on the basis of e, a physical constant representing the charge of an electron.

Submission + - Hackers Steal Card Data from Neiman Marcus (krebsonsecurity.com)

Fnord666 writes: Another day another data breach. Apparently high end retailer Neiman Marcus has also suffered a breach of credit card data. Krebs on Security has the news:.
"Responding to inquiries about a possible data breach involving customer credit and debit card information, upscale retailer Neiman Marcus acknowledged today that it is working with the U.S. Secret Service to investigate a hacker break-in that has exposed an unknown number of customer cards."

Submission + - Target Admits 110 Million Victims in Data Breach, Not 40 Million (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: Retail giant Target continues to drastically downplay the impact of the massive data breach it suffered during December, even while admitting the number of customers affected is nearly twice as large as it had previously estimated. Target admitted today the massive data breach it suffered during the Christmas shopping season was more than twice as large and far more serious than previously disclosed. A Jan. 10 press release admits the number of customers affected by the second-largest corporate data breach in history had increased from 40 million to 70 million, and that the data stolen included emails, phone numbers, street addresses and other information absent from the stolen transactional data that netted thieves 40 million debit- and credit-card numbers and PINs. “As part of Target’s ongoing forensic investigation, it has been determined that certain guest information — separate from the payment card data previously disclosed — was taken during the data breach” according to Target’s statement. “This theft is not a new breach, but was uncovered as part of the ongoing investigation.” The new revalation does represent a new breach, however, or at least the breach of an unrelated system during the period covered during the same attack, according to the few details Target has released. Most analysts and news outlets have blamed the breach on either the security of Target’s Windows-based Point-of-Sale systems or the company’s failure to fulfill its security obligations under the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS).

Submission + - London Mayor to Spend £90,000 on Water Cannons (ubmfuturecities.com)

An anonymous reader writes: London Mayor Boris Johnson is planning to spend at least £90,000 on truck-mounted water cannons in order to control rioters. While the mayor says he intends to consult citizens about this potential investment before moving ahead, the city has been in the process of training police on the use of water cannons since last summer. Johnson claims that the water cannons would only be used in "extreme" situations; however, those who oppose the idea fear that water cannons will be used to quell peaceful protests, not just riots.

Submission + - Running Your Own Private Email Server in the post-Snowden Era (jeffreifman.com)

reifman writes: Here's a detailed tutorial for setting up open source iRedMail server with Roundcube webmail in the cloud. While running your email on a VPS isn't fully secure, it removes you from the mass unauthorized surveillance that's occurring at gmail. I also recommend support for open source encrypted email clients such as Mailpile. This is an update to the 2011 Ask Slashdot on gmail alternatives.

Submission + - Amazon Vows To Fight Government Requests for Data (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: Speaking at a cloud panel discussion hosted by Reuters on Wednesday, Terry Wise, head of global partner ecosystem for Amazon Web Services, explained how the company handles government requests for data stored on Amazon's cloud: 'If a U.S. entity is serving us with a legally binding subpoena, we contact our customer and work with that customer to fight the subpoena.' But Wise's best advice to customers is to encrypt their data: 'If the data is encrypted, all we'd be handing over would be the cypher text,' he said.

Submission + - Microsoft Managers Now In Charge of Washington State's Budget (thestranger.com)

reifman writes: The Seattle Times reports 'For the first time in state history, the Washington state budget is being written by Microsofties,' Representative Ross Hunter has 'tamed his Microsoft-style head-butting with a politician’s trust-building.' While Senator Andy Hill is 'the first Senate budget chair ever to request Excel files instead of paper spreadsheets.' 'The two must find $1 billion in new money for the state’s K-12 system.' Unfortunately, The Times neglects to mention that Hunter and Microsoft are behind the deficit and cutbacks in the first place. Hunter helped pass the amnesty bill for Microsoft's $1.5 billion dollar Nevada tax dodge ($4.37 billion if you include impacts from its lobbying to reduce tax rates) that contributed to $4 billion in cuts to K-12 and higher education since 2008. The state has resorted to taxing using Yelp to tax dancing to try to make up the shortfall (for real).

Submission + - Developers may be getting 50% of their documentation from Stack Overflow (ninlabs.com) 1

gameweld writes: "Software companies, such as Microsoft, create documentation for millions of topics concerning its APIs, services, and software platforms. Creating this documentation comes at a considerable cost and effort. And after all this effort much documentation is rarely consulted and lacking enough examples. A new study suggests that developers are increasingly consulting Stack Overflow and crowd-sourced sites over official documentation, using it as much as 50% of time. How should official documentation be better redesigned? What are the implications of software created from unruly mashups?"

Computers can figure out all kinds of problems, except the things in the world that just don't add up.