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Working Off the Clock, How Much Is Too Much? 582

The Wall Street Journal has word of yet another suit against an employer who required an "always on" mentality to persist because of easily available communications. Most of us working in some sort of tech related job are working more than 40 hours per week (or at least lead the lifestyle of always working), but how much is too much? What methods have others used in the past to help an employer see the line between work and personal life without resorting to a legal attack? "Greg Rasin, a partner at Proskauer Rose LLP, a New York business law firm, said the recession may spawn wage-and-hour disputes as employers try to do the same amount of work with fewer people. The federal Fair Labor Standards Act says employees must be paid for work performed off the clock, even if the work was voluntary. When the law was passed in 1938, 'work' was easy to define for hourly employees, said Mr. McCoy. As the workplace changed, so did the rules for when workers should be paid."

Submission + - SPAM: Humans lose $21 billion to computer traders

destinyland writes: ""We are just mice dancing" between the supercomputers of Wall Street giants, complains one trading executive, and an investment manager notes computers are making 73% of all stock trades on U.S. exchanges. One former NYSE chairman admitted "This is where all the money is getting made." (Between April and June, Goldman Sachs earned $100 million in one day — on 46 different days.) High-speed algorithms use 30-millisecond trades to probe market conditions, and can buy and sell with a nearly omniscient knowledge of every other investor's price point. The New York Times notes that already these algorithms "execute millions of orders a second and scan dozens of public and private marketplaces simultaneously...""
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Linux Business

Submission + - GPL2 Libraries - Is there a point ?

PiSkyHi writes: I understand that if I build an application that links with a library that is licensed under GPL2, I must also make my application GPL2. I can see that value in this for an application, but for a library, what's to stop me separating my program into a GPL2 compliant client app that talks to the rest of my (choose my own license) application ?

Submission + - Social engineering: Are your ID badges showing? (csoonline.com)

SarahS writes: "Johnny Long (of Google Hacking fame, interviewed here) claims that the easiest way to "hack" into a company isn't with a computer — it's by putting on a fake ID badge and walking in the door like you mean it. If no one at your company is actually verifying badges, then too bad for you, the social engineer just got inside. In this excerpt on CSOonline.com from Long's book, No Tech Hacking, the author explains — with photo proof — why it's so easy for social engineers to create fake ID cards. "Traveling in tech circles, I've seen my share of lanyard clutter, but this nice lady took the prize for most neck-flair toted by a female. As I drew closer, I realized that her badge was decidedly governmental in appearance. ... As she continued chatting into the phone, I swung around to the other side of her and stepped in as close as I could without triggering her (admittedly impaired) stalker detection system. Less than a foot away from her, I snapped the photo below. This particular badge is issued to government employees stationed at the Pentagon. The Post-It note reminds her to "bring a copy of yesterday's all hands to DSS H.Q.'""

Programmers used to batch environments may find it hard to live without giant listings; we would find it hard to use them. -- D.M. Ritchie