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An anonymous reader writes: Not too many years ago, the Community Association Institute developed a statement of principles for homeowners and community leaders that live within community associations. It was hoped that in adopting the "Rights and Responsibilities" resolution, a community would be able to build consensus among its members and promote community involvement. It was also hoped that the document would serve as a continuing guidepost for all those involved in the community — board members, managers, homeowners, and non-owner residents, alike. It serve as a tool for balancing the needs of the homeowners with the needs of the community as a whole and would minimize the potential for conflict by laying out the mutual rights and responsibilities of all members of the community. Thousands of communities across the nation adopted the community association "Bill of Rights" at the time it was originally written and many community associations in the Houston area have been using the Rights and Responsibilities document as a the foundation for their community's operation ever since. Below is a list of the homeowner associations in the Greater Houston area who have adopted the "Rights and Responsibilities for Better Communities" resolution and registered their action with the Community Association Institute: Adopting the community association "Bill of Rights" in your community is easy. The Community Association Institute outlines a simple six step process. 1. Distribute the document throughout the community by way of the community newsletter or website. Announce and publicize when and where the document will be adopted. 2. Explain why this important to your community and the benefits it can create. 3. Review and discuss the merits of the principles at an open meeting of your Board of Directors. 4. Solicit input from homeowners. 5. Have your board vote to adopt a resolution endorsing the "Rights and Responsibilities for Better Communities." The principles will be more meaningful to homeowners and community leaders if they are formally adopted. 6. Send a note to the Community Association Institute to let them know when the resolution was adopted and your community will receive a commemorative certificate. For information, visit

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