Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
For the out-of-band Slashdot experience (mostly headlines), follow us on Twitter, or Facebook. ×

Comment: Re:It's not about passively watching (Score 2) 114 114

I agree fully. Having tried to get my mind around d3.js, there are *a lot* of leaps of understanding in coming to up to speed. Watching someone who provides a narrative how they get from a to d by verbalizing b and c will help immensely. The docs really go just from a to g.

Comment: It's not about passively watching (Score 3, Interesting) 114 114

As a viewer, it's about learning technique and thought processes. Identifying issues, attempting a particular thought process, only those that provide a strong narrative to the work they are doing will be likely "stars". Watching how good programmers (assumption) deal with their environment and the typical problems they face. Seeing how people top down or bottom up write code is very interesting (within limits).

As a broadcasting coder, it takes a fair amount of personal confidence to do it, particular in this field. Having to verbalize what you are thinking and how you are considering the problems in front of you is actually quite challenging. Those that do well in the broadcasting scene will most likely be strong professionally as well.

That said, I personally don't understand the fandom about broadcast games to the level that it has taken. I get the benefits, but I don't get the market.

Comment: It's all about the Fi (Score 1) 68 68

Tin foil hat on. It came to me last week.

Google has recently released Project Fi. A project/product (is project a codeword for beta now?) that will allow seamless transition between 2G/3G/LTE and *WiFi* for increased coverage and strength.

Project Fi is bandwidth charged, independent of data link being used - so while the underlying carriers (T-Mobile & Sprint) may charge wholesale for data, google will effectively get the bandwidth at "Google WiFi" for free - meaning that the data charges are a lot more profitable when going past a Starbucks, in NYC, etc. Although unproven, google might actually have meaningful alternate revenue sources from this model.

This is not fundamentally different than Xfinity's wifi sharing - except google is going for the Free WiFi in the Starbucks, NYC, etc. B2B is a lot more pragmatic, and a lot easier to enable.

Now if only Project Fi worked in a phone that was in the $2-300 range, I'd probably give it a go. But the Nexus 6 is too big and too expensive. Hopefully the invite won't expire.

Comment: It takes four magic words in the first sentence (Score 2) 479 479

Hi, I'm an enraged customer, I'd like to speak to your escalations manager.

It helps to say that in the kindest possible tone, too.

"Escalation manager" is the normal term for someone who talks to "enraged customers". It may or may not be what your ISP uses, but the two phrases in the same sentence tend to get you to the right manager.

--dave
Did escalations for a while at Sun, some of the problems were real fun. Others weren't.

Comment: Change your name to Sanjay Gupta (Score 0) 135 135

The guys that kept their jobs during the DotCon collapse were those that had "community organizers" that helped them negotiate big cuts in salary and finding shared housing in the area to cut living expenses.

In practice what this means: Try to hook into the H-1b ethnic network somehow. Perhaps the best way to survive a collapse in employment is to get a tan, change your legal name to the moral equivalent of Sanjay Gupta and contact one of the many immigration law firms in the valley that aid and abet H-1b immigration fraud with a sob story about how you're going to be sent back "home" (don't tell them "home" is Champaign Urbana Illinois) if you can't find a job -- and that you'll be willing to take a big pay cut and live in a beehive to stay in "America". Do it with the appropriate accent. They'll hook you up with a "community organizer".

Comment: Re:"stealing just like stealing anything else" (Score 1) 408 408

Imagine if a company in Virginia had, in their terms and conditions, a line prohibiting a citizen of Massachusetts from purchasing their product or service? One requiring they buy it from a specified licencee in Mass?

Can you say "criminal conspiracy in restraint of trade" ?

Comment: Re:Little Tiny Keyboards (Score 1) 67 67

The fact that they have a design patent aside, Blackberry has been iterating on the fret + rounded keys design since the blackberry bold. It's what makes a "modern" blackberry recognizable.

https://www.google.com/search?...
https://www.google.com/search?...

They look quite similar.

Comment: Re:Little Tiny Keyboards (Score 1) 67 67

From TFA, it is a design patent - aka Trade Dress.

From http://www.theglobeandmail.com... , the actual complain seems with merit. The frets (metal lines), key shape (rounded corners) and space bar seem to be pulled entirely from the Blackberry Q10. It's as blatant as the typical Chinese typo-based (Sony vs Somy) ripoffs.

If you saw a phone with a the Typo keyboard, it would be reasonable to assume that its an extra tall Q10. That's what Blackberry has sued about.

Comment: Epic fail: someone always matches (Score 2, Interesting) 129 129

This scheme will work for one branch in Lesser Nowhere, Sechwan Province, with a finite and small set of pictures, and a small number of crooks. Once the number of faces increases, the probability of a false positive explodes, roughly as (N 2) (select every two out of N), where N is the size of the pools of pictures + the person being scanned.

The well-known example is the "birthday paradox", in which twenty-three people at a party increases the probability of two of them having the same birthday to fifty-fifty. That particular case was because the actual probability was multiplied by (25 2) = 25! / ((25-2)! * 2!) = 6900 comparisons being made, times 1/365 chances of a hit.

The German federal security service considered using one of my then employer's recognizers for airports to catch terrorists, but ended up facing the problem of accusing grandma of being part of the Bader-Meinhoff gang (;-)) No matter how accurate we were, a few more people in the pool would give us false positives. We'd need roughly an accuracy of 99.9 followed by roughly as many decimal places of 9s as there were powers of ten of people.

--dave

Comment: Piece of American Culture? (Score 1) 776 776

From TFA...

tricked into viewing a piece of American culture ruined and rewritten right in front of their very eyes.

.

It's an Australian movie, set in Australia, with Australian actors, Australian Director, Australian Writers.

Piece of co-opted Australian culture... They even drive on the left side of the road - check out IMDb for shots of the yellow interceptors...

Hollywood never co-opts other cultures do they...
   

Comment: It's EU privacy laws (Score 1) 135 135

EU privacy laws are fairly painful for US companies to comply with. To do business with EU individuals, Personal Identifiable Information needs to be handled according to a set of rules - http://ec.europa.eu/justice/da...

It is often simpler for Amazon deployed companies to set up in the Ireland AWS zone.

As others have mentioned, most foreign SIGINT/COMINT agencies can't gather intelligence domestically, so it lowers barriers. Ironically US companies that want to deal with EU customers may end up moving everything to Ireland. However this allows the NSA to gather intelligence indirectly on US citizens.

Comment: many recruiters are hired off the street (Score 1) 227 227

A sister company did recruiting, and a then colleague said "I asked for a MVS and Unix person in a particular state with experience in a package", and got hundreds of names, none of whom knew all those things". The didn't know the difference between "and" (3 candidates) and "or" (3000 unqualified candidates). I still get requests for things I only ever did once, with co-requisites of things I've never done...

Steve Jobs said two years ago that X is brain-damaged and it will be gone in two years. He was half right. -- Dennis Ritchie

Working...