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Privacy

Phorm "Edited and Approved" UK Government Advice 126

Posted by kdawson
from the odd-bedfellow dept.
Barence was one of several readers to send in word that the UK Home Office checked whether its interpretation of the law suited Phorm, before issuing advice on the legality of the controversial advertising service. The Home Office and Phorm entered a dialogue about the company's services back in August 2007, at Phorm's request. In an email sent to Phorm in January 2008, a Home Office official writes: 'I should be grateful if you would review the attached document, and let me know what you think.' After Phorm made deletions and amendments to the document, the Home Office sent another email to the company stating: 'If we agree this, and this becomes our position do you think your clients and their prospective partners will be comforted.' From the BBC: "Baroness Sue Miller, Liberal Democrat spokeswoman on Home Affairs, told BBC News: 'My jaw dropped when I saw the Freedom of Information exchanges. ... Anything the Home Office now says about Phorm is completely tainted.'"
Privacy

UK Government To Monitor All Internet Use 446

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the foil-hats-aren't-going-to-cut-it dept.
nk497 writes "The UK government has further detailed plans to track all communications — mobile phone calls, text messages, email and browser sessions — in the fight against terrorism, pedophiles and organized crime. The government said it's not looking to see what you're saying, just to whom and when and how. Contrary to previous plans to keep it all in a massive database, it will now let ISPs and telecoms firms store the data themselves, and access it when it feels it needs it." And to clarify this, Barence writes "The UK Government has dropped plans to create a massive database of all internet communications, following stern criticism from privacy advocates. Instead the Government wants ISPs and mobile phone companies to retain details of mobile phone calls, emails and internet sites visited. As with the original scheme, the actual content of the phone calls and messages won't be recorded, just the dates, duration and location/IP address of messages sent. The security services would then have to apply to the ISP or telecoms company to have the data released. The new proposals would also require ISPs to retain details of communications that originated in other countries but passed over the UK's network, such as instant messages."
Government

CIA Expert Decries E-Voting Security 178

Posted by Soulskill
from the only-vote-that-matters-is-the-cia-assassin's dept.
ISoldat53 sends this quote from McClatchy DC: "The CIA, which has been monitoring foreign countries' use of electronic voting systems, has reported apparent vote-rigging schemes in Venezuela, Macedonia and Ukraine and a raft of concerns about the machines' vulnerability to tampering. Appearing last month before a US Election Assistance Commission field hearing in Orlando, Fla., a CIA cybersecurity expert suggested that Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and his allies fixed a 2004 election recount, an assertion that could further roil US relations with the Latin leader. ... Stigall said that most Web-based ballot systems had proved to be insecure. The commission has been criticized for giving states more than $1 billion to buy electronic equipment without first setting performance standards. Numerous computer-security experts have concluded that US systems can be hacked, and allegations of tampering in Ohio, Florida and other swing states have triggered a campaign to require all voting machines to produce paper audit trails."
Image

DIY Space Photography 106

Posted by samzenpus
from the exploring-on-a-budget dept.
Four Spanish teenagers sent a camera-operated weather balloon into the stratosphere. The boys built the electronic sensor components from scratch. Gerard Marull Paretas, Sergi Saballs Vila, Marta Gasull Morcillo and Jaume Puigmiquel Casamort attached a £56 camera to a heavy duty £43 latex balloon, and sent their science project 20-miles above the Earth. Team leader Gerard Marull, 18, said, "We were overwhelmed at our results, especially the photographs, to send our handmade craft to the edge of space is incredible."
Space

+ - Students space picture with a cheap camera->

Submitted by
Richard Rothwell
Richard Rothwell writes "Using a helium balloon and a cheap digital camera, four school students from IES La Bisbal school in Catalonia captured an image from 20 miles high — well into the stratosphere. The report, on the Daily Telegraph's website, includes one of the images they captured.

Building the electronic sensor components from scratch, Gerard Marull Paretas, Sergi Saballs Vila, Marta Gasull Morcillo and Jaume Puigmiquel Casamort managed to send their heavy duty latex balloon to the edge of space and take readings of its ascent. The total cost of this exercise was in the low hundreds of Euros, eat your heart out NASA!

Created by the four students under the guidance of teacher Jordi Fanals Oriol, the budding scientists, all aged 18-19, followed the progress of their balloon using high tech sensors communicating with Google Earth."

Link to Original Source
Censorship

+ - Australia's net filter ruled by one bureaucrat->

Submitted by mask.of.sanity
mask.of.sanity (1228908) writes "The accountability of the federal government's Internet content filter has been called into question following revelations that the decision to ban Web sites lacks consultation and can be made by a single staffer.

Media outlets everywhere were threatened with an $11,000 fine if they republished the link to the recently banned AbortionTV.com which was first published by a Whirlpool user who was merely quoting the blacklist watchdog's own public relations department. The watchdog yesterday banned Wikileaks for the same offence, and are now being goaded by clever users to blacklist their own Wikipedia site which contained the link for a time. No word on that yet, but the edits have been closed.

It is claimed the watchdog has "absolutely no review process whatsoever; the decision to ban content is final, and there is no judicial oversight.

Further, "the decision is made by a single staffer, even someone part of a graduate process, who assumes the classification board would not like [a Web site].""

Link to Original Source
Censorship

Wikileaks Pages Added To Australian Internet Blacklist 437

Posted by timothy
from the paging-dr-streisand-dr-streisand dept.
cpudney writes "The Sydney Morning Herald reports that the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has added several Wikileaks pages to its controversial blacklist. The blacklisted pages contain Denmark's list of banned websites. Simply linking to addresses in ACMA's blacklist attracts an $11,000 per-day fine as the hosts of the popular Australian broadband forum, Whirlpool, discovered last week when they published a forum post that linked to an anti-abortion web-site recently added to ACMA's blacklist. The blacklist is secret, immune to FOI requests and forms the basis of the Australian government's proposed mandatory ISP-level Internet censorship legislation. Wikileaks' response to notification of the blacklisting states: 'The first rule of censorship is that you cannot talk about censorship.'" So Australians aren't allowed to see what it is that the Danes aren't allowed to see?
Censorship

+ - Wikileaks pages banned in Australia-> 1

Submitted by
cpudney
cpudney writes "The Sydney Morning Herald reports that the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has added several Wikileaks pages to its controversial blacklist. The blacklisted pages contain Denmark's list of banned websites. Simply linking to addresses in ACMA's blacklist attracts an $11,000 per-day fine as the hosts of the popular Australian broadband forum, Whirlpool, discovered last week when they published a forum post that linked to an anti-abortion web-site recently added to ACMA's blacklist. The blacklist is secret, immune to FOI requests and forms the basis of the Australian government's proposed mandatory ISP-level Internet censorship legislation. Wikileaks' response to notification of the blacklisting states: "The first rule of censorship is that you cannot talk about censorship.""
Link to Original Source
Microsoft

+ - Microsoft Shoots Own Foot in Iceland-> 1

Submitted by
David Gerard
David Gerard writes "The Microsoft Certified Partner model is: an MCP buys contracts from Microsoft and sells them to businesses as a three-year timed contract, payable in annual instalments. Iceland's economy has collapsed, so 1500 businesses have gone bankrupt so aren't paying the fees any more. But Microsoft has told the MCPs: "Our deal was with you, not them. Pay up." The MCPs that don't go bankrupt in turn are moving headlong to Free Software. Taking most of the country with them. (Warning: link contains salty language and vivid imagery.)"
Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - Verizon Intends to Share Your Personal Information->

Submitted by
hyades1
hyades1 writes "Gizmodo reports that Verizon is sending out notification letters infested with virtually-indecipherable legalese. In their sneaky, underhanded way, they're informing you that you have 45 days to opt out of their plan to share your personal data with "affiliates, agents and parent companies". That data can include, but isn't limited to, "services purchased (including specific calls you make and receive), billing info, technical info and location info."

If you view your statement on-line, you won't even get the letter. You'll have to access your account and view your messages. However, Read Write Web says the link provided there, called the "Customer Proprietary Network Information Notice", was listed as "not available."



No doubt Verizon would like to reassure you that everyone they're going to hand your personal data over to will have your best interests at heart."

Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - Did Slashdot cause a UK Government U-turn?->

Submitted by
Richard Rothwell
Richard Rothwell writes "Jack Straw has announced today a back down on plans to exempt the UK Government from the Data Protection Act. The announcement was made to the Daily Telegraph initially — saying that it will completely remove the offending clause from the Coroners and Justice Bill. The effect of this clause was reported earlier on Slashdot.

In the report, Jack Straw's minions seem to underplay the impact of the Slashdot article and mass Facebook/NO2ID campaign. Is this because they are worried that this sort of campaign could be launched at any time to keep them honest?"

Link to Original Source

Comment: Did Slashdot cause the UK Government U-turn? (Score 1) 262

by rar42 (#27111789) Attached to: UK Government Wants To Bypass Data Protection Act

The UK Government has announced today - to the Daily Telegraph initially - that it will completely remove the offending clause from the Coroners and Justice Bill.

In the report, Jack Straw's minions seem to underplay the impact of the Slashdot article and mass Facebook/NO2ID campaign. Is this because they are worried that this sort of campaign could be launched at any time to keep them honest?

Privacy

+ - UK Government to bypass the Data Protection Act-> 1

Submitted by
rar42
rar42 writes "Clause 152 of the Coroners and Justice Bill — currently being debated by the UK Parliament — would allow any Minister by order to take any information gathered for one purpose from anywhere, and use it for any other purpose.

Personal information arbitrarily used without consent or even knowledge. The very reverse of 'Data Protection'.

An 'Information Sharing Order', as defined in Clause 152, would permit personal information to be trafficked and abused, not only all across government and the public sector — it would also reach into the private sector. And it would even allow transfer of information across international borders.

NO2ID has launched a Facebook group to challenge this threat to data protection."

Link to Original Source

"The vast majority of successful major crimes against property are perpetrated by individuals abusing positions of trust." -- Lawrence Dalzell

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