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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 18 declined, 4 accepted (22 total, 18.18% accepted)

+ - Mozilla CEO attacked about his views of Gay Marriage.

Submitted by raque
raque (457836) writes "The NYTimes is running this story about Mozilla CEO Brendan Eich being attacked about his views on Gay Marriage. The Times reported that okcupid.com was blocking access to their site for Firefox users.

Is there anything in the ideals of the Open Source community that is relevant to Gay Marriage and LGBT issues in general? Is supporting Gay Marriage a requirement for developing Open Source Software? As I read the story and comments I was wondering how sexual orientation fit into the GPL."

+ - Netflix slams big ISPs over Net Neutrality.

Submitted by raque
raque (457836) writes "CNN Money is carrying this story about the conflict between Netflix and the big ISPs.

Netflix is correct is saying that they shouldn't have to pay a fee to ISPs like Comcast and Verizon to do what users, like me, are already paying them to do. I already pay Verizon to provide my bandwidth, and I pay Netflix to access their content. ISPs complaining that services like Netflix generate a lot of traffic ignore the fact that they are already being paid to handle that traffic."

+ - NYTimes OP-ED on the rise of the Global Commons and the rise of Anti-Capitalism 1

Submitted by raque
raque (457836) writes "The NYTimes has this article, by Jeremy Rifkin, on how the rise of "Free" and "Open" economies are changing the world. He argues that the "Internet of Things" is driving down the Marginal Cost of of products to the point where they can't be made profitably anymore. Hence, market forces don't apply to them.

Though he crows about how this is a great thing, I do see some undersides. Do we really want people making things like Hot Water heaters for themselves?"

+ - Should more math and equations be used in the popular press?-> 1

Submitted by raque
raque (457836) writes "The NYTimes (standard disclaimers apply) published two OP-EDs in their Philosophy section (first here second here), The Stone, discussing how Heisenberg's Uncertainty principle is abused. The second is a followup to the first. The author struggled to make clear his point and left the impression he was creating a strawman argument. In his followup he said that he was avoiding equations due to his writing for a general audience. I replied to both articles as Rtbinc, in the second I put up the following comment:

One of the issues is that Dr Callendar has is a fear of Math and equations in popular reading. A lot of other people are afraid of these few very pretty symbols. Lets do an experiment and see if using some equations and symbols drives readers into fits of terror and prevents their understanding as they cower shivering under their chairs.

The below is from Heinz Pagels in the Cosmic Code (available on Kindle from Amazon and Nook from B&N for about 10 bucks). It shows up on Google books too. Go look, it's fun.

One part of the Uncertainty Principal is (p)x(q)h – where p and q (the is pronounced delta, e.g., delta-p) are the sums of all of the uncertainties — or differences — in a huge pile of measurements of the position and velocity of some particle we're measuring – and h is the tiny, but still not zero, number called the Plank constant. The mathematical symbols haven't changed meaning, so if h ain't zero, neither p or q can be either. We can be as precise as we like, until we hit the Plank Constant. This is not some mathematical oddity, it is how the universe operates. That is weird, and that is one example of quantum weirdness.

The question for the experiment is: Would Dr Callendar have done better to use the equation in the first article instead of metaphors from TV and Movies? Or, did they so frighten you that you need a good stiff brandy and a foot rub.

So I'm asking the same question to everyone on Slashdot. Would Dr Callendar been better off just diving in and dealing with Heisenberg and quantum mechanics using the tools that were developed for it."
Link to Original Source

+ - What role do the Humanities play on Slashdot?

Submitted by raque
raque (457836) writes "The "NYTimes has this story on the growing hostility towards the Humanities and the Liberal Arts in American Education. I see two questions here: What does this mean for Slashdot? We're about STEM here, but the method used is the written word. Without Humanities how well will we be able to write? The second is that tech employees move up the corporate ladder the "tech" becomes less and less important. IT managers don't program, they write memos, proposals, email after email. It would would seem to me that success in moving up the ladder depends on skills developed in the Humanities classroom more then the CS lab."
Bug

+ - Pages 4.3 vs. BBEdit 10.5: How Apple Doesn't Respect Its Users->

Submitted by
raque
raque writes "For 22 years Tidbits has served the community of Apple users from fanboys to professionals. Tidbits publisher Adam Engst discusses how undocumented changes to how Pages 4.3 handles the epub format nearly sank his latest ebook on iTunes 11. He points out the differences between Apple's cavalier and high handed attitude to Barebones software's professional and clear response to issues with their software.

From a marketing point of view not admitting to mistakes and issues may make sense, but it creates havoc for those who's livelihoods depend on software doing what is supposed to do, and what it did last time. Not providing an accurate and complete change-log has become an Apple hallmark. Tuaw has an article up on undocumented changes to IOS 6.1's music controls. That may not be a big thing, but what else did they change?"

Link to Original Source

+ - Robots join search for Amelia Earhart's lost plane->

Submitted by
raque
raque writes "Following up on an earlier story.
A group of aviation archaeologists will use underwater robots along with submersibles and sonar to search for Amelia Earhart's plane. The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery will search this July for the aircraft, which went down 75 years ago. "If there's wreckage there that can be recovered, we need to know what it is, how big it is, what it looks like, and what it's made of so we can prepare a recovery expedition that has equipment to raise whatever's there," said Richard Gillespie, the group's executive director.
Also explained are how this is being paid for and what FedEx did to help."

Link to Original Source
Apple

+ - Apple's Retail Army, Long on Loyalty but Short on Pay->

Submitted by
raque
raque writes "The NYTimes is reporting on just how badly Apple Retail employees are being paid. Apple is exploiting it's fan base for cheep labor. This is one reason I don't go to Apple Stores if I can avoid it. Stores like NY's Tekserve offer a great shopping experience without so exploiting their workers"
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Censorship

+ - Apple's new MacBooks have built-in copy protection->

Submitted by
raque
raque writes "Appleinsider is reporting that the new MacBooks/MacBookPro's have built in copy protection Quote "Apple's new MacBook lines include a form of digital copy protection that will prevent protected media, such as DRM-infused iTunes movies, from playing back on devices that aren't compliant with the new priority protection measures" . Arstechnica is also reporting on the same issue HERE

Is this the deal they had to make to get NBC back?
Is this a deal breaker for Apple or will fans just ignore it to get their hands on the pretty new machines?
Is this a new opportunity for Linux? And what happened to Jobs not liking DRM?"

Link to Original Source

Little known fact about Middle Earth: The Hobbits had a very sophisticated computer network! It was a Tolkien Ring...

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