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Comment: Re:Church and Einstein (Score 4, Informative) 414

by raahul_da_man (#41654999) Attached to: Einstein Letter Critical of Religion To Be Auctioned On EBay

"Only the Church stood squarely across the path of Hitler's campaign for suppressing truth."

Einstein was wrong about this one, if it is in fact an authentic Einstein quote. Can someone please verify for me?
The Catholic and Protestant Churches supported both Nazism and Fascism.

On the Protestant side:

European Protestantism bore the fierce impress of Martin Luther, whose 1543 tract On the Jews and Their Lies was a principal inspiration for Mein Kampf. In addition to his anti-Semitism, Luther was also a fervent authoritarian. Against the Robbing and Murdering Peasants, his vituperative commentary on a contemporary rebellion, contributed to the deaths of perhaps 100,000 Christians and helped to lay the groundwork for an increasingly severe Germo-Christian autocracy.

On the Catholic:

The Lateran Treaty of 1929 was when the Catholic Church threw its full formal support behind Mussolini. Of course, there had been longstanding informal support long before this, but this is the formal document that the Church cannot deny! It is a impossibility to win power in heavily Christian countries like Italy and Germany were in the 1920's without the active support of the church.

+ - War on Drugs->

Submitted by
raahul_da_man
raahul_da_man writes "[Quote]
Have been very interested in this prohibition issue for the last 6 months — I think it is a major injustice.
[/quote]

The above is a direct quote from the webartist.

The uncanny parallels between alcohol Prohibition and the ‘war on drugs’. why is a failed idea still the only way to proceed?"

Link to Original Source

+ - How do I get back into IT after a five year absence?

Submitted by boredemt
boredemt (2661457) writes "I know this kind of question is asked ad nauseum, but I can't think of a better place to ask. I used to work in IT. Mostly Windows administration and support. Typical corporate stuff. I was laid off in 2007 and, out of a need to pay the bills, I took my volunteer hobby (Emergency Medical Services) and started doing it full time. Fast forward five years and I'm sort of stuck in EMS. To add to it I was recently injured at work and it doesn't look like I'm going to be able to go back. I've been applying to some IT jobs but it seems that my hiatus from the field has made me a dinosaur. I actually had a hiring manager tell me that directly. So, Slashdotters, what's my best route back with an (extremely) limited budget?"
The Military

+ - Chuck Yeager Re-Enacts the Historic Flight that Broke the Sound Barrier

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens writes
Hugh Pickens writes writes "The Seattle Times reports that exactly 65 years to the minute after becoming the first human to fly faster than the speed of sound, retired Air Force Brig. Gen. Chuck Yeager flew in the back seat of an F-15 Eagle as it broke the sound barrier at more than 30,000 feet above California's Mojave Desert — the same area where he first achieved the feat in 1947 while flying an experimental rocket plane. Asked by a young girl if he was scared during Sunday's flight, Yeager joked, "Yeah, I was scared to death." Yeager made the first supersonic flight in a rocket-powered, Bell X-1, known as the XS-1 for "experimental, supersonic," attached to the belly of a B-29 aircraft. Hiding the pain of broken ribs from a midnight horse race after a night of drinking at Pancho Barnes' Happy Bottom Riding Club, Yeager squeezed into the aircraft with no safe way to bail out. Soon after the rocket plane was released, Yeager powered it upward to about 42,000 feet altitude, then leveled off and sped to 650 mph, or Mach 1.07. Some aviation historians contend that American pilot George Welch broke the sound barrier before Yeager, while diving an XP-86 Sabre on October 1, 1947 and there is also a disputed claim by German pilot Hans Guido Mutke that he was the first person to break the sound barrier, on April 9, 1945, in a Messerschmitt Me 262. Yeager's flight was portrayed in the opening scenes of "The Right Stuff," the 1983 movie, based on the book by Tom Wolfe that chronicles America's space race. For his part Yeager said nothing special was going through his mind at the time of the re-enactment. "Flying is flying. You can't add a lot to it.""
Games

+ - When has one 'finished' a game?

Submitted by Diskonekted
Diskonekted (1004373) writes "With more and more games being released each year (some with DLC), where does one find the time to see them through to completion? With this in mind, what do we all consider "completing a game"? Some would say that this is finishing the story-line and seeing the developers credits, others would wager that 100% of the achievements should be obtained, some would argue that every possible outcome should be experienced. I think it depends on the type of the game, but what do you think?"

+ - Einstein letter calling Bible "pretty childish" to be auctioned on eBay->

Submitted by cheesecake23
cheesecake23 (1110663) writes "In an admirably concise piece in The Atlantic, Rebecca J. Rosen summarizes Einstein's subtle views on religion and profound respect for the inexplicable, along with the news that a letter handwritten by the legendary scientist that describes the Bible as a 'collection of honorable, but still primitive legends' and 'pretty childish' will be auctioned off on eBay over the next two weeks. Bidding will begin at $3 million."
Link to Original Source
Moon

+ - A Supercomputer on the Moon to Direct Deep Space Traffic 1

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens writes
Hugh Pickens writes writes "NASA currently controls its deep space missions through a network of 13 giant antennas in California, Spain and Australia known as the Deep Space Network (DSN) but the network is obsolete and just not up to the job of transmitting the growing workload of extra-terrestrial data from deep space missions. That's why Ouliang Chang has proposed building a massive supercomputer in a deep dark crater on the side of the moon facing away from Earth and all of its electromagnetic chatter. Nuclear-powered, it would accept signals from space, store them, process them if needed and then relay the data back to Earth as time and bandwidth allows. The supercomputer would run in frigid regions near one of the moon’s poles where cold temperatures would make cooling the supercomputer easier, and would communicate with spaceships and earth using a system of inflatable, steerable antennas that would hang suspended over moon craters, giving the Deep Space Network a second focal point away from earth. As well as boosting humanity's space-borne communication abilities, Chang's presentation at a space conference (PDF) in Pasadena, California also suggests that the moon-based dishes could work in unison with those on Earth to perform very-long-baseline interferometry, which allows multiple telescopes to be combined to emulate one huge telescope. Best of all the project has the potential to excite the imagination of future spacegoers and get men back on the moon."
Facebook

+ - Wall Street Journal describes how Facebooks Outs your Most Personal Secrets->

Submitted by McGruber
McGruber (1417641) writes "The Wall Street Journal (FREE Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444165804578008740578200224.html) is reporting that Facebook revealed the sexual preferences of users despite those users have choosen "privacy lockdown" settings on Facebook.

The article describes two students who were casualties of a privacy loophole on Facebook—the fact that anyone can be added to a group by a friend without their approval. As a result, the two lost control over their secrets, even though both students were sophisticated users who had attempted to use Facebook's privacy settings to shield some of their activities from their parents.

Facebook spokesprick Andrew Noyes responded with a statement blaming the users: "Our hearts go out to these young people. Their unfortunate experience reminds us that we must continue our work to empower and educate users about our robust privacy controls.""

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Science

+ - Complex Logic Circuit Made from Bacterial Genes->

Submitted by another random user
another random user (2645241) writes "Just as electronic circuits are made from resistors, capacitors and transistors, biological circuits can be made from genes and regulatory proteins. Engineer Tae Seok Moon’s dream is to design modular “genetic parts” that can be used to build logic controllers inside microbes that will program them to make fuel, clean up pollutants, or kill infectious bacteria or cancerous cells.

The circuit Moon eventually built consisted of four sensors for four different molecules that fed into three two-input AND gates. If all four molecules were present, all three AND gates turned on and the last one produced a reporter protein that fluoresced red, so that the operation of the circuit could be easily monitored."

Link to Original Source

+ - Blackhole's 'point of no return' found-> 1

Submitted by dsinc
dsinc (319470) writes "Using a continent-spanning telescope, an international team of astronomers has peered to the edge of a black hole at the center of a distant galaxy. For the first time, they have measured the black hole’s “point of no return” — the closest distance that matter can approach before being irretrievably pulled into the black hole.

According to Einstein’s theory of general relativity, a black hole’s mass and spin determine how close material can orbit before becoming unstable and falling in toward the event horizon. The team was able to measure this innermost stable orbit and found that it’s only 5.5 times the size of the black hole’s event horizon. This size suggests that the accretion disk is spinning in the same direction as the black hole.
The observations were made by linking together radio telescopes in Hawaii, Arizona, and California to create a virtual telescope called the Event Horizon Telescope, or EHT. The EHT is capable of seeing details 2,000 times finer than the Hubble Space Telescope."

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Comment: Other folding container designs (Score 3, Informative) 188

by raahul_da_man (#37506356) Attached to: Are Folding Containers the Future of Shipping?

While this company's idea is interesting, it is still two years away from even being approved for commercial use. There are at least two competitors with easier, simpler to use technology:

Indian Shipping Company

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CV-R5jlf6bQ&feature=related

Dutch variant

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHlTrOVv9gs&feature=related

The problem, so many shipping containers just pilling up unused in the Western world, and forcing the creation of countless new containers in Asia, is certainly worth solving. But so many companies have tried and failed before. For my money, the Indian or Dutch version seems that more likely to win out. India has far lower steel costs, and is at the centre of shipping between Asia, Europe, Africa and Australia.

Everyone can be taught to sculpt: Michelangelo would have had to be taught how not to. So it is with the great programmers.

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