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Comment: Re:Is there an counter to this? (Score 1) 251

by r_jensen11 (#47715577) Attached to: Comcast Training Materials Leaked

This is way too much effort, unless you happen to enjoy yanking some chains over the phone.

Here's how you quit Comcast:

(1) Disconnect every piece of Comcast equipment in your home.
(2) Load it in a box, and put the box in your car.
(3) Drive to the nearest Comcast customer center.
(4) Dump the box on the counter and tell the rep: "I wish to terminate my service immediately."

No one will argue with you. You have completely bypassed Comcast's customer retention process by doing this. Pay the amount due on your bill, get a receipt with a complete list of the equipment you've turned in, then go home.

The process Comcast has for this involves:
1) Finding a customer center that's open when you're available
2) Returning the equipment to the counter
3) Take a ticket
4) Wait 1+hrs while other people complain about their bills
5) Get confirmation from the customer service rep that your account is in good standing and now closed

Comment: Re:It's not a kernel problem (Score 2) 727

by r_jensen11 (#47715443) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

The problem is the GUI. People don't like X, and Linux people have no desire to give us anything else.

I seriously doubt the premise that the common user cares about X enough to not like it. The operating system is a platform for people to run the programs they need to accomplish certain tasks. Windows will continue to be the heavyweight champion because there is so much legacy crap out there which nobody cares to port over to other platforms. It's not a matter of saying that Linux has application A which is fully compatible with application B on Windows; it's a matter of saying that a user can accomplish everything s/he needs to within a single platform. For many of the people who make the decisions in the enterprise environment, that means people can accomplish everything they do in:
Excel
PowerPoint
Outlook
and *maybe* Word

Comment: Re:Someone with no brain is running NASA (Score 1) 162

by r_jensen11 (#47715295) Attached to: Wheel Damage Adding Up Quickly For Mars Rover Curiosity

Pic of the wheel ...

http://www.garrettbelmont.com/...

The first time when I saw the wheels I was wondering why the hell they spend so much money to send up a robot to Mars and then equip that thing with such flimsy wheels

And I did post question here on /, and there were people (NASA fanbois, perhaps) defending those flimsy wheels

I wish the wheels on my daily driver would last as many years without servicing as Curiosity's have.

Comment: Re:put it in bridge mode (Score 1) 224

by r_jensen11 (#47631463) Attached to: The Hidden Cost of Your New Xfinity Router

If you call Comcast's customer service, they can put their new routers into bridge mode. This turns off its WiFi and other unnecessary features and makes it act like their old routers.

The fact that you have to call Comcast's customer support to change between router & bridge mode is a serious PIA. I got called in to provide tech support for some people we volunteer with and was stuck waiting for over an hour to make a simple configuration change. This is after previous calls getting dropped because the call center reps couldn't manage to transfer me to the appropriate (or even wrong) departments.

Comment: Re:We're only talkin' two Red Line subway stops (Score 1) 205

by r_jensen11 (#47613639) Attached to: MIT Considers Whether Courses Are Outdated

Not to discredit, but to clarify TFA:

While students at MIT and Harvard do cross-register, the logistics of travel from one campus to another limit the extent to which this is practical. Online makes it possible for students to take classes from across universities more conveniently.”

We're talking two subway stops. Or they can rent a bike, which are all over the place and very well maintained: http://www.thehubway.com/stati...

Or, shorter than walking from one end of campus to the other end of several large universities....

Comment: Sure, but... (Score 1) 502

In order for solar+battery tech to become a viable solution, there needs to be ways to move the electricity generated by the solar panels to batteries you want to use. I.e. co-locate the two (e.g. panels & cars at home; panels & cars at work) or network them together (e.g. panels at home, cars at work.) The first scenario isn't very likely considering the sun generally shines when people are at work and the concentration of vehicles at work will overshadow the electricity generated by panels at an office building. The second scenario begs the question "who maintains the grid." In the US, this is the power companies, who could presumably adjust their business models and charge network access fees instead of production fees.

Comment: Re:Colorado has California over a barrel (Score 1) 377

by r_jensen11 (#47531753) Attached to: Western US States Using Up Ground Water At an Alarming Rate

You mean where they've been at the highest point in a decade....

A decade is an awfully small sample size for resources which can have replenishment schedules measured in centuries:

Natural refilling of deep aquifers is a slow process because groundwater moves slowly through the unsaturated zone and the aquifer. The rate of recharge is also an important consideration. It has been estimated, for example, that if the aquifer that underlies the High Plains of Texas and New Mexico—an area of slight precipitation—was emptied, it would take centuries to refill the aquifer at the present small rate of replenishment. In contrast, a shallow aquifer in an area of substantial precipitation such as those in the coastal plain in south Georgia, USA, may be replenished almost immediately.

Source: http://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycleinfiltration.html

Comment: Re:Not worth it (Score 1) 138

by r_jensen11 (#47452167) Attached to: Three-Year Deal Nets Hulu Exclusive Rights To South Park

I look at it this way: I can pay $100+ a month to watch cable TV with commercials or I can pay $9 for Netflix, $8 for Hulu Plus, and nothing for my TV antenna for local shows. Yes, the ads on Hulu Plus are annoying, repetitive, and can't be skipped. But, I grew up in the 70s and 80s and have developed the skills to cope with ads and the lack of time shifting for local news. Millennial's milage may vary...

The problem is, how much of that $100 is your internet bill? Adding the TV channels to my Comcast bill added ~$30/mo to my bill, and that included all of the sports channels we would use (e.g. ESPN family, B1G, Tennis Channel, &c.) as well as HBO. Granted, we used a cablecard w/ an HDHR unit to avoid another $20-$30/mo and the headache of using their DVR (why the hell can't it output the video in a fixed format instead of switching between 480P/720P/1080i when channel surfing???), but spending $30/mo for TV at home was much cheaper than going to the bars to watch the same games.

Comment: Re:remove Health Care from jobs and then labor cos (Score 1) 154

by r_jensen11 (#47144281) Attached to: Google To Close Its American Moto X Factory

I pay $194/month as a retiree for former-employer-subsidized healthcare....

Want to really help the American people? Pass the Fair Tax, which would put everyone back to work and they could then buy their own healthcare without the gov't getting involved in paying for it.

The "Fair Tax" sounds an awfully lot more fair when you're not spending 90% of your salary just to get by.

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